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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2019

Christine Trimingham Jack and Linda Devereux

The purpose of this paper is to provide language and meaning to open up silence around traumatic boarding school memories through the symbolic aura (Nora 1989) surrounding…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide language and meaning to open up silence around traumatic boarding school memories through the symbolic aura (Nora 1989) surrounding key memory objects. The secondary aim is to illustrate to historians the importance of paying attention to interviewees’ discussion of material objects as clues to uncovering deeper, unexplored memories.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach draws on Vamik Volkan’s (2006) understanding of “linking objects” – significant objects preserved or created by traumatised people. Traumatic emotions become linked with loss and grief associated with the object, turning it into a tightly packed symbol whose significance is “bound up in the conscious and unconscious nuances of the relationship that preceded the loss” (Volkan, 2006, p. 255). The experiences of the two authors are examined as exemplars in this process.

Findings

The exemplars illustrate how complicated and long term the process of remembering and understanding is for those who experience boarding school trauma and the power of “linking objects” to open up memory surrounding it. The case studies also alert educational historians to how emotionally fraught revealing what happened can be and how long it may take to confront the events.

Originality/value

Linking objects have not previously been used in relationship to surfacing boarding school trauma. The paper is also unique in offering deep analysis of boarding school trauma undertaken by skilled educational researchers who incorporate reflections from their own experience informed by broad theory and pertinent psychological research.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 48 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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Article
Publication date: 26 August 2014

Michael Roland, Josef Langer and Rene Mayrhofer

The purpose of this paper is to address the design, implementation, performance and limitations of an environment that emulates a secure element for rapid prototyping and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the design, implementation, performance and limitations of an environment that emulates a secure element for rapid prototyping and debugging. Today, it is difficult for developers to get access to a near field communication (NFC)-secure element in current smartphones. Moreover, the security constraints of smartcards make in-circuit emulation and debugging of applications impractical. Therefore, an environment that emulates a secure element brings significant advantages for developers.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors' approach to such an environment is the emulation of Java Card applets on top of non-Java Card virtual machines (e.g. Android Dalvik VM), as this would facilitate the use of existing debugging tools. As the operation principle of the Java Card VM is based on persistent memory technology, the VM and applications running on top of it have a significantly different life cycle compared to other Java VMs. The authors evaluate these differences and their impact on Java VM-based Java Card emulation. They compare possible strategies to overcome the problems caused by these differences, propose a possible solution and create a prototypical implementation to verify the practical feasibility of such an emulation environment.

Findings

While the authors found that the Java Card inbuilt persistent memory management is not available on other Java VMs, they present a strategy to model this persistence mechanism on other VMs to build a complete Java Card run-time environment on top of a non-Java Card VM. Their analysis of the performance degradation in a prototypical implementation caused by additional effort put into maintaining persistent application state revealed that the implementation of such an emulation environment is practically feasible.

Originality/value

This paper addresses the problem of emulating a complete Java Card run-time environment on top of non-Java Card virtual machines which could open and significantly ease the development of NFC secure element applications.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

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Article
Publication date: 19 January 2010

Hélène Cherrier and Tresa Ponnor

The purpose of this paper is to investigate consumers' motivation to accumulate obsolete items and their reluctance to dispose of material possessions.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate consumers' motivation to accumulate obsolete items and their reluctance to dispose of material possessions.

Design/methodology/approach

The role of attachment to material possession in the construction of consumer identity provides a conceptual framework for the research. A video‐ethnography with eight individuals, who classify themselves as functional hoarders, individuals who accumulate objects privately and are unable to dispose without clear conscious motivation or control, constitute the primary data for this paper.

Findings

In investigating the underlying reasons for accumulating objects and resisting dispossession, informants show evidence of being reflective consumers who perceive throwing away as a threat to memory, to security, and to historical and ecological preservation. First, this paper confirms current literature regarding the role of possessions as symbols of interpersonal ties with others and as a cue to past experiences. Second, the paper supports that possessions provide a sense of security to the owner. Finally, this paper reinforces that preserving material objects cultivate a vision for the future. Ultimately, informants' motivations to accumulate, to keep, and to not‐dispose of objects reflects a desire to reassemble the fragments of their temporal experience into a unique space where memories, present, and life projects join together.

Originality/value

The accompanying film gives an opportunity for audience members to personally evaluate hoarding practices and to draw their own conclusion on the dynamic nature of material attachment and consumer identity in terms of past experiences, present orientation, and responsibility for the future.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2020

Erin B. Stutelberg

This paper aims to engage nine women English teachers in exploring their personal memories centered around the perception of their raced, classed and gendered teacher…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to engage nine women English teachers in exploring their personal memories centered around the perception of their raced, classed and gendered teacher bodies, and led them to conceptualize teaching as invasion.

Design/methodology/approach

The process of collective memory work (CMW), a qualitative feminist research method, was used to structure collaborative sessions for the nine women English teachers. In these sessions, the group took up the CMW process as the memories were written, read, analyzed and theorized together.

Findings

The analyses of two memories from our group's work builds understanding of how the use of new materialism and a conceptualization of emotions as social, collective and agentic, can expand the understanding of the teacher bodies and disrupt normalizing narratives of teaching and learning. The post-humanist concept of intra-action leads one to better understand the boundaries in the teacher – student relationships that is built/invaded, and to see the ways materials, humans, emotions and discourses are entangled in the teaching encounters.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates how sustained and collective research methodologies like CMW can open space for teachers to more fully explore their identities, encounters and relationships. Further, unpacking everyday classroom moments (through the framework of literacy-as-event) can yield deep and critical understanding of how bodies, emotions and non-human objects all become entangled when teaching becomes an act of invasion.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Aiman El Asam and Muthanna Samara

The purpose of this paper is to examine the Cognitive Interview (CI) and its usefulness in improving recall among Arab children. Totally, 64 Arab children (9-12 years old…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the Cognitive Interview (CI) and its usefulness in improving recall among Arab children. Totally, 64 Arab children (9-12 years old) took part in this study; they viewed a short video scene followed by the CI or a Structured Interview (control).

Design/methodology/approach

The study measured for recall of correct, incorrect, confabulated details and accuracy level. Using the interview type, delay type (2-4, 7-10 and 14-16 days) and age group (9-10 and 11-12 years) a MANCOVA test showed that the CI group produced significantly more correct, incorrect and confabulated details compared to the control.

Findings

Delay had a significant effect on recall of correct detail while the older group of children produced significantly more correct details, higher accuracy and fewer incorrect and confabulated details. Although the CI is a potentially transferable method to be used with Arab children, careful consideration should be given to its difficulty along with cultural issues.

Originality/value

This is the first study to consider CI among Arab sample of children. Most research have looked at western cultures, hence this study was needed to extend knowledge and test if the CI is transferable to a different culture.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 March 2018

Ulla Gain

Cognitive computing is part of AI and cognitive applications consists of cognitive services, which are building blocks of the cognitive systems. These applications mimic…

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87

Abstract

Cognitive computing is part of AI and cognitive applications consists of cognitive services, which are building blocks of the cognitive systems. These applications mimic the human brain functions, for example, recognize the speaker, sense the tone of the text. On this paper, we present the similarities of these with human cognitive functions. We establish a framework which gathers cognitive functions into nine intentional processes from the substructures of the human brain. The framework, underpins human cognitive functions, and categorizes cognitive computing functions into the functional hierarchy, through which we present the functional similarities between cognitive service and human cognitive functions to illustrate what kind of functions are cognitive in the computing. The results from the comparison of the functional hierarchy of cognitive functions are consistent with cognitive computing literature. Thus, the functional hierarchy allows us to find the type of cognition and reach the comparability between the applications.

Details

Applied Computing and Informatics, vol. 16 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2634-1964

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Article
Publication date: 6 October 2020

Mulki Indana Zulfa, Rudy Hartanto and Adhistya Erna Permanasari

Internet users and Web-based applications continue to grow every day. The response time on a Web application really determines the convenience of its users. Caching Web…

Abstract

Purpose

Internet users and Web-based applications continue to grow every day. The response time on a Web application really determines the convenience of its users. Caching Web content is one strategy that can be used to speed up response time. This strategy is divided into three main techniques, namely, Web caching, Web prefetching and application-level caching. The purpose of this paper is to put forward a literature review of caching strategy research that can be used in Web-based applications.

Design/methodology/approach

The methods used in this paper were as follows: determined the review method, conducted a review process, pros and cons analysis and explained conclusions. The review method is carried out by searching literature from leading journals and conferences. The first search process starts by determining keywords related to caching strategies. To limit the latest literature in accordance with current developments in website technology, search results are limited to the past 10 years, in English only and related to computer science only.

Findings

Note in advance that Web caching and Web prefetching are slightly overlapping techniques because they have the same goal of reducing latency on the user’s side. But actually, the two techniques are motivated by different basic mechanisms. Web caching uses the basic mechanism of cache replacement or the algorithm to change cache objects in memory when the cache capacity is full, whereas Web prefetching uses the basic mechanism of predicting cache objects that can be accessed in the future. This paper also contributes practical guidelines for choosing the appropriate caching strategy for Web-based applications.

Originality/value

This paper conducts a state-of-the art review of caching strategies that can be used in Web applications. Exclusively, this paper presents taxonomy, pros and cons of selected research and discusses data sets that are often used in caching strategy research. This paper also provides another contribution, namely, practical instructions for Web developers to decide the caching strategy.

Details

International Journal of Web Information Systems, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-0084

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2005

Yoshiharu Asakura, Gen Okuyama, Yoshitaka Nakayama, Kazutoshi Usui and Yukikazu Nakamoto

A unified application management framework for Linux and Java applications on mobile phones is presented. Although Java‐based applications for mobile phones are in strong…

Abstract

A unified application management framework for Linux and Java applications on mobile phones is presented. Although Java‐based applications for mobile phones are in strong demand, the complexity of interaction between these platform independent programs and the core functionality of mobile phones has made software development difficult. The unified framework presented here provides uniform application state management and inter‐application communication between Java based and operating‐system specific applications, allowing native Linux applications to be directly replaced with the equivalent Java application. The framework is described in detail and a trial implementation of the system is evaluated.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1995

Timothy J. Waltz, David (Chi‐Chung) Yen and Sooun Lee

Summarizes the basic tenets of an object‐oriented database system,including a brief history of object‐oriented programming as well as adiscussion of what the object

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1756

Abstract

Summarizes the basic tenets of an object‐oriented database system, including a brief history of object‐oriented programming as well as a discussion of what the object‐oriented approach entails. Includes definitions on key concepts and terminology. Discusses the pros and cons of the object‐oriented model, along with a comparison with relational database systems. Finally, covers a development plan for implementing an object‐oriented database system, with details about what types of costs and concerns are involved.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 95 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2018

Mihaela Kelemen and Lindsay Hamilton

The purpose of this paper is to provide new insights into the social impact of creative research methods.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide new insights into the social impact of creative research methods.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the new methodology of cultural animation (CA), the authors highlight how knowledge can be co-produced between academics, community members and organisational practitioners. Drawing on the UK Connected Communities programme, the authors explore examples of immersive and performative techniques including arts and crafts, drama and poetry.

Findings

The authors showcase the practical and theoretical benefit of such exercises to generate impact and influence. Empirically, the authors demonstrate the potential of CA to bring together researchers and community members in useful partnerships that foster dialogical exchange. Theoretically, the authors extend and develop the value of American Pragmatism by highlighting how democratic, iterative and practical learning plays out through the materials, networks and processes of cultural animation.

Social implications

Exploration of the examples leads us to propose and explore impact as a form of legacy which captures the temporal, processual and performative nature of knowledge sharing and co-production.

Originality/value

The methodology of CA is innovative and has not been tested widely to date although, as the authors illustrate, it is particularly useful for encouraging interaction between academics and the wider world by developing and nurturing interactions and relationships. It carries potential to contribute new insights to the theorisation and lived experience of organisation.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

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