Search results

1 – 10 of 35
Click here to view access options
Case study
Publication date: 2 August 2012

Meredith Gethin-Jones, Susan Fleming and Melissa C. Thomas-Hunt

Marissa Mayer has been asked to think about factors that were impacting Google’s ability to innovate and adjust its strategy so that the organization could remain one of…

Abstract

Marissa Mayer has been asked to think about factors that were impacting Google’s ability to innovate and adjust its strategy so that the organization could remain one of the world’s foremost leaders in technology. In an industry (and at a company) that was changing and growing exponentially, it would be difficult to pinpoint specific variables and trends. But Mayer knew that one element crucial to Google’s ongoing success would be its ability to recruit the best talent available and foster an environment that would encourage that talent to generate the best ideas. As Mayer contemplated how to ensure this, she considered that women currently represented only a small fraction of Google’s engineers, suggesting a missed opportunity.

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

Click here to view access options
Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Melissa Thomas-Hunt, Meredith Gethin-Jones and Susan Fleming

Marissa Mayer has been asked to think about factors that were impacting Google's ability to innovate and adjust its strategy so that the organization could remain one of…

Abstract

Marissa Mayer has been asked to think about factors that were impacting Google's ability to innovate and adjust its strategy so that the organization could remain one of the world's foremost leaders in technology. In an industry (and at a company) that was changing and growing exponentially, it would be difficult to pinpoint specific variables and trends. But Mayer knew that one element crucial to Google's ongoing success would be its ability to recruit the best talent available and foster an environment that would encourage that talent to generate the best ideas. As Mayer contemplated how to ensure this, she considered that women currently represented only a small fraction of Google's engineers, suggesting a missed opportunity.

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2005

Melissa C. Thomas-Hunt

An organized social group is always a stratified social body. There has not been and does not exist any permanent social group which is ‘flat’ and in which all members are…

Abstract

An organized social group is always a stratified social body. There has not been and does not exist any permanent social group which is ‘flat’ and in which all members are equal.—Pitirim Sorokin (1927)

Details

Status and Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-358-7

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 26 June 2007

Susan F. Cabrera and Melissa C. Thomas-Hunt

Drawing upon Cabrera and Thomas-Hunt's (2006) theoretical framework for the advancement of executive women, we identify gender differences in social networks as an…

Abstract

Drawing upon Cabrera and Thomas-Hunt's (2006) theoretical framework for the advancement of executive women, we identify gender differences in social networks as an important determinant of the relative perceived credibility of men and women and the opportunities for hire and promotion available to them. A review of the existing research literature on gender and social networks is presented and several potentially fruitful avenues for future research in this area are discussed.

Details

Social Psychology of Gender
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1430-0

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2005

Gwen M. Wittenbaum and Jonathan M. Bowman

Two decades of research have identified a robust effect: Members of decision-making groups mention and repeat shared information that all members know more so than…

Abstract

Two decades of research have identified a robust effect: Members of decision-making groups mention and repeat shared information that all members know more so than unshared information that a single member knows. This chapter explores the idea that processes related to member status both affect and explain information exchange in decision-making groups. First, we offer five propositions that identify information sharing patterns and their implications for high- and low-status group members. Second, we highlight three theoretical explanations for the group preference for shared information and examine how well each theory accounts for the proposed member status processes.

Details

Status and Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-358-7

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2005

Abstract

Details

Status and Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-358-7

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2005

Abstract

Details

Status and Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-358-7

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2005

Edward J. Lawler

This chapter organizes the other chapters of the volume around a fundamental status-affirmation principle, namely, that status differentials generate corresponding…

Abstract

This chapter organizes the other chapters of the volume around a fundamental status-affirmation principle, namely, that status differentials generate corresponding differences in performance expectations which, in turn, produce behaviors that affirm performance expectations. The chapters in this volume elaborate that proposition by showing how information exchange, patterns of privilege, and the accuracy of power perceptions reflect or strengthen the status-affirmation process. Several chapters also suggest conditions that forestall or weaken this process such as claims to expertise and communication styles. Other chapters can be construed as offering applications of the status-affirmation principle to the performance of corporate project teams and to the relationships between standard and nonstandard employees in the workplace. Overall, the chapters reflect the strength and vitality of the tradition of work on group processes.

Details

Status and Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-358-7

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2005

Martine R. Haas

Drawing on sociological role theory, this chapter introduces and explains the distinction between cosmopolitan and local role orientations as status categories in…

Abstract

Drawing on sociological role theory, this chapter introduces and explains the distinction between cosmopolitan and local role orientations as status categories in international teams. Qualitative data from a multimethod field study conducted at a leading international development agency illustrates that the high status of cosmopolitans and locals in this setting was based on expectations that these team members would enable their teams to more effectively interpret knowledge obtained from outside sources. The possible dynamics of status rivalry and deference in teams with cosmopolitan and local membership are explored, and their implications for team performance are addressed. Thus, status in groups is viewed as both contested and contingent on the situation.

Details

Status and Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-358-7

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2005

Jennifer R. Overbeck, Joshua Correll and Bernadette Park

Social and task groups need a few high-status members who can be leaders and trend setters, and many more lower-status members who can follow and contribute work without…

Abstract

Social and task groups need a few high-status members who can be leaders and trend setters, and many more lower-status members who can follow and contribute work without challenging the group's direction (Caporael (1997). Personality and Social Psychology Review, 1, 276–298; Caporael & Baron (1997). In: J. Simpson, & D. Kenrick (Eds), Evolutionary social psychology (pp. 317–343). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum; Brewer (1997). In: C. McGarty, & S.A. Haslam (Eds), The message of social psychology: Perspectives on mind in society (pp. 54–62). Malden, MA: Blackwell). When groups come together without a priori status differentiation, a status hierarchy must be implemented; however, if the new members are too homogeneously status seeking, then it is not clear what will result. We argue that hierarchy will develop even in uniformly status-seeking groups, and that the social context and members’ relational characteristics – specifically, the degree to which they are group oriented rather than self-serving – will predict which status seekers succeed in gaining status. We discuss why and how a “status sorting” process will occur to award status to a few members and withhold it from most, and the consequences of this process for those who are sorted downward.

Details

Status and Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-358-7

1 – 10 of 35