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Book part
Publication date: 13 January 2011

Neil Ford, Melissa Bowden and Jill Beard

This chapter focuses on how social media tools can be used to enhance collaboration in higher education and the benefits and challenges that this can bring. We investigate…

Abstract

This chapter focuses on how social media tools can be used to enhance collaboration in higher education and the benefits and challenges that this can bring. We investigate how two social media tools, social bookmarking, and microblogging, can be utilized to foster collaboration and determine why this is important in contemporary higher education. Case studies of social media use at Bournemouth University show how social bookmarking and microblogging have already yielded benefits.The case studies are grounded in the challenges facing higher education in 2010. We explore how social media has been used in the context of a need to enhance academic excellence and drive efficiencies in the face of funding constraints and changing demographics.

The case studies illustrate, first, how social bookmarking has been used to foster group cohesion, reflective practice, and evaluative skills in students, as well as being used at an institutional level to drive professional and administrative efficiencies; and second, how microblogging has made a difference in promoting reflective learning, group cohesion, and professional awareness in students and how this style of social networking has contributed to enhancing academic and professional networks.

Whilst the tools, uses, and stakeholders vary, the case studies show how social media has enabled collaboration between, students, academics, librarians, learning technologists, and even professional groups beyond the institution. We conclude that, when used appropriately, social media can facilitate the collaboration that will be essential to overcome the challenges facing higher education.

Details

Higher Education Administration with Social Media
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-651-6

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Book part
Publication date: 13 January 2011

Jill Beard is a Library and Learning Support Manager at Bournemouth University, a service which includes libraries, learning technology, and academic skills development…

Abstract

Jill Beard is a Library and Learning Support Manager at Bournemouth University, a service which includes libraries, learning technology, and academic skills development. She has written extensively over many years on a wide range of subjects and is currently co-editing a book on Digital Library Environments in Higher Education (Ashgate, 2010).

Details

Higher Education Administration with Social Media
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-651-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 13 January 2011

Abstract

Details

Higher Education Administration with Social Media
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-651-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 13 January 2011

Laura A. Wankel and Charles Wankel

Since the advent of the digital campus, numerous changes have occurred. In early developments, we were able to improve efficiencies and eliminate the need for human…

Abstract

Since the advent of the digital campus, numerous changes have occurred. In early developments, we were able to improve efficiencies and eliminate the need for human intervention to conduct routine activities. The power of processing massive amounts of data moved from mainframes to desktops and mobile computers. The transition to a ubiquitous computing environment was a relatively quick transition and one that has had a profound impact on the work we do and the way we do it. The presence of information technology has actually transformed the teaching, learning, and administrative environment in post-secondary education world-wide.

Details

Higher Education Administration with Social Media
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-651-6

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2019

Craig Cameron, Janine Ashwell, Melissa Connor, Mary Duncan, Will Mackay and Jeff Naqvi

Work-integrated learning (WIL) poses legal, reputation, operational, strategic and financial risks for higher education providers (HEPs). The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Work-integrated learning (WIL) poses legal, reputation, operational, strategic and financial risks for higher education providers (HEPs). The purpose of this paper is to explore how HEPs can manage five significant WIL risks involving intellectual property, student disability and medical conditions, the host organisation and the legal literacy of WIL practitioners.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a cross-institutional collaboration of WIL practitioners who explored risk management in WIL programmes. The case study is presented as a cross-case analysis to assist WIL stakeholders with evaluating their risk management frameworks. A description about the significance of the risk (in terms of causes and consequences), as well as practices to manage the risk, is presented under each of the five WIL risks.

Findings

WIL practitioners described a series of risk management practices in response to five significant risks in WIL programmes. Four themes underpinning these risk management practices – balance, collaboration, relationship management and resources – are conceptualised as characteristics that can serve as guiding principles for WIL stakeholders in risk management.

Practical implications

The findings can be applied by WIL stakeholders to evaluate and improve existing risk management frameworks, and to improve their legal literacy in relation to WIL. The study also demonstrates the capacity for collaborative research to address practice issues in WIL.

Originality/value

This is the first known study which employs a cross-institutional collaboration of WIL practitioners to contribute towards the body of knowledge examining risk management in WIL programmes.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Dirk H.R. Spennemann, Melissa Pike and Maggie J. Watson

Birds are implicated in spoiling and decay of buildings, especially through their droppings. Pigeons are considered the main culprits, and several studies have examined…

Abstract

Purpose

Birds are implicated in spoiling and decay of buildings, especially through their droppings. Pigeons are considered the main culprits, and several studies have examined the effects and chemistry of accumulations of droppings without evidence to the exact origins of the source of the excreta. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This study reviews and summarises the state of knowledge with regard to the impact of bird excreta on buildings. It experimentally assesses the acidity of fresh pigeon excreta with different diets and examines the development of the acidity of the excreta after voiding.

Findings

Feral pigeons in urban settings are known to be fed by a range of foods. Urban food scraps-derived diets produce more acidic excreta than more natural diets such as seeds. This is a first study of its kind to examine the impact of a bird’s diet on the pH and thus the resulting (potential) decay of masonry.

Research limitations/implications

This study showed that from a management’s perspective, pigeons that subsist entirely on human provided foods will be depositing more initially acidic faeces. If faecal accumulation occurs; then, mould and other bacteria quickly alter the chemistry from acidic towards basic, but the damage may already be done.

Originality/value

This paper is the first study of its kind to examine the effects of fresh pigeon droppings of known origin and age once voided from the intestine. This allows the authors to assess the impact during the first few days.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Seleshi Sisaye

The purpose of this paper is to document the integration of sustainability into the accounting curriculum. Compared to many disciplines in the social and administrative…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to document the integration of sustainability into the accounting curriculum. Compared to many disciplines in the social and administrative sciences, the greening of the curriculum in accounting is a recent phenomenon. Nevertheless, there has been a remarkable growth in both the content and the coverage of sustainability topics integrated into the accounting curriculum.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach to the paper is multidisciplinary. It has combined organizational sociology and ecological anthropology approaches in the integration of sustainability into the accounting curriculum. In accounting, there is an increasing emphasis on the application of social science perspectives, particularly sociology and anthropology in curriculum development and pedagogical issues. This paper demonstrates that the influence of these two disciplines in accounting education is substantial.

Findings

Sustainability in accounting has both theoretical and practical implications. Theoretically, sustainability has integrated social and environmental dimensions into accounting education and research. Sustainability reporting contains information on the economic, social, and environmental activities of business organizations. In practice, sustainability has influenced the accounting standard-setting organizations in developing guidelines on how to integrate sustainability into corporate reports so that the information can be verified and certified by public accounting and regulatory organizations.

Originality/value

The paper is among the first to demonstrate the importance of organizational sociology and ecological anthropology for the integration of sustainability into the accounting curriculum. Both sociology and anthropology have been in the forefront of the study of ecology and natural resources management and conservation in sustainability development. The paper approaches have important implications for sustainability education and framework in accounting theory and research.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

Keywords

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