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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Melchor C. de Guzman

There is a prevailing perception that police officers are antagonistic to any civilian review process. This perception also includes the assumption that all police…

Abstract

There is a prevailing perception that police officers are antagonistic to any civilian review process. This perception also includes the assumption that all police officers are one in denouncing any civilian review. This research examines the degree to which these prevailing perceptions about police officers' views of civilian reviews reflect reality. This research contends that there is reason to question the overwhelming assumption in the literature that police officers are united in their views about civilian review. The research found that police officers have varying perceptions about civilian review. Furthermore, these differences in perceptions are correlated with the experience of being subjected to these reviews. The data indicate that experience with civilian review tend to draw positive perceptions from the police. On the other hand, police officers who have never been subjected to civilian review have less than positive perceptions of review boards. The research findings also indicate that civilian review boards need to overcome these initial negative perceptions especially among police officers who have never had a case adjudicated by a civilian review board.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Melchor C. de Guzman and James Frank

Determining the impact of civilian review board on the police is a challenging process. The task is complicated due to the absence of baseline data that will account for…

Abstract

Determining the impact of civilian review board on the police is a challenging process. The task is complicated due to the absence of baseline data that will account for observed changes in citizen complaints, especially if the concept is a novelty in a particular jurisdiction. Likewise, using traditional measures of impact such as the number of complaints or conviction rates is problematic due to a variety of confounding factors. This study examines the perceptions of complainants and officers concerning the impact of civilian review boards. Using data collected through surveys of police officers and complainants in a metropolitan area in the Philippines, the study focuses on “learning” as a viable construct to measure the impact of civilian review boards and the perceived deterrent effects of these boards. The research found that civilian review boards have a significant impact on police officer perceptions as well as on the police department. The study also shows that learning may be a viable measure for studying the impact of civilian review boards.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Melchor C. de Guzman and James Frank

The lot of policewomen has been a difficult adaptation to a predominantly male‐dominated organization. Being traditionally dominated by males, the police organization may…

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Abstract

The lot of policewomen has been a difficult adaptation to a predominantly male‐dominated organization. Being traditionally dominated by males, the police organization may become a problematic workplace for policewomen. In a patriarchal society, women are placed at a disadvantage because of gender‐related workplace problems that may arise. This study involves an assessment of the gender‐related problems experienced by the policewomen of the Philippine National Police in the central region of the Philippines. Likewise, the study provides analyses of the relationships of these gender‐related problems to the job performance of women officers. Using a survey questionnaire, gender‐related problems of policewomen are identified and related to their performance using both objective and subjective measures. The data indicate that women officers experience gender‐related problems. However, these problems do not seem to relate significantly to their job performances.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Melchor C. de Guzman and Korni Swaroop Kumar

The purpose of this paper is to examine and propose an extension of Lundman's theory. Lundman presented a theoretical framework that predicted the evolution of policing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine and propose an extension of Lundman's theory. Lundman presented a theoretical framework that predicted the evolution of policing from an informal to a formal type. Essentially, he stated that the types of policing in society were determined by the patterns of solidarity, élite interests, and crimes rates/images of disorder. This research argued that the theory could be extended not only to predict the type of policing but also the quality and quantity of policing. Particularly, this research explored the relationships of the élite interest and the rates/images of criminality to policing practices by examining evidence from the research literature about India.

Design/methodology/approach

Research studies about Indian police practices were extracted from the major western criminology, criminal justice, and policing journals. Using content analyses, two propositions were analyzed. The first proposition was that the evidence from the literature would suggest that threats of the disadvantaged and marginalized groups against the dominant élite groups would influence the quality of policing. The second proposition was that the evidence from the literature would show that rates and images of criminality would influence the quantity of policing.

Findings

Very little quantitative literature exists to examine the propositions using meta‐analysis. The existing policing literature from India that was examined indicated support for the propositions.

Research limitations/implications

As the literature was mostly anecdotal and normative, a more dynamic view of the relationships among the variables should be explored using the positivist approach.

Originality/value

Police characters are influenced by the social order. Systemic reforms often fail because of the obstacles presented by the social and political influences. Therefore, a larger social reform should be undertaken.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Book part
Publication date: 21 July 2011

Jon S.T. Quah

In his March 1986 article in Newsweek, Russell Watson exposed “Queen Imelda” Marcos's life of indulgence as the Philippines' First Lady in the opening paragraph:Three…

Abstract

In his March 1986 article in Newsweek, Russell Watson exposed “Queen Imelda” Marcos's life of indulgence as the Philippines' First Lady in the opening paragraph:Three thousand pairs of shoes, size eight and a half. Five shelves of unused Gucci handbags, still stuffed with paper, price tags still attached. Five hundred bras, mostly black, and a trunk full of girdles, 40 and 42 inches around the hips. Huge bottles of perfume, vats of Christian Dior wrinkle cream, a walk-in-safe littered with dozens of empty jewelry cases. When the palace of Ferdinand and Imelda Marcos was opened to the public as a museum last week, foreigners and Filipinos alike gawked at what the former First Lady had left behind. “It was the worst case of conspicuous consumption I have ever seen,” said an American visitor, Rep. Stephen Solarz. “Compared to her, Marie Antoinette was a bag lady.” (Watson, 1986, p. 14)

Details

Curbing Corruption in Asian Countries: An Impossible Dream?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-819-0

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