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Article
Publication date: 8 September 2022

Melanie Stephens, Lydia Hubbard, Siobhan Kelly, Andrew Clark and Lorna Chesterton

The purpose of this paper is to report on an interprofessional (IPE) student training scheme recently conducted in three care homes across the Northwest of England. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on an interprofessional (IPE) student training scheme recently conducted in three care homes across the Northwest of England. The intervention was designed as a feasibility study to explore the impacts such schemes have on residents, students and care home staff. Additional lessons emerged that contribute to the design and direction of future IPE initiatives in other care homes and care settings.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study outlines how the intervention was designed and implemented and the findings from its evaluation. This paper uses Biggs’ (1993) presage–process–product framework to evaluate the process of setting up care homes as a site of collaborative learning.

Findings

Collaborative working between stakeholders is necessary for the successful implementation of IPE in care home settings. The process is complex and requires communication and commitment across all levels of engagement. For this model to grow and have a beneficial impact on older people’s lives, there are layered factors to consider, such as the socio-political context, the characteristics of the individuals who participate and diverse approaches to learning.

Research limitations/implications

This case study reports the subjective views of the research collaborators. While this raises the potential for bias, it presents an “insider” perspective of the research process and offers learning that might be beneficial in efforts to run future IPE training schemes.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no other research studies or published interventions have been identified that explicitly address the experiences of implementing an IPE training scheme in UK care home settings. This paper will therefore be useful to academic researchers, individuals managing student placements and to health and social care staff who wish to learn about of the value of IPE learning schemes.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 October 2011

Slawek Magala

364

Abstract

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Abstract

Details

Advances in Accounting Education Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-758-6

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

David M. Boje and David Perez

Professor Slawomir Magala is a full professor of Cross-Management at the Department of Organization and Personnel Management in Rotterdam School of Management (RSM), Erasmus…

Abstract

Purpose

Professor Slawomir Magala is a full professor of Cross-Management at the Department of Organization and Personnel Management in Rotterdam School of Management (RSM), Erasmus University (RSM, 2015). His education stems from Poland, Germany and the USA, and has taught and conducted research in China, Egypt, Kazakhstan, Croatia, Estonia, the United Kingdom and Namibia. He is a former Chair for Cross-Cultural Management at RSM and has achieved many things, from being editor-in-chief of the Journal of Organizational Change Management (JOCM), to receiving the Erasmus Research Institute in Management (ERIM) Book Award (2010), for The Management of Meaning in Organizations (Routledge, 2009). It has received honors for being the best book in one of the domains of management research. It was selected by an academic committee, consisting of the Scientific Directors of CentER (Tilburg University), METEOR (University of Maastricht) and SOM (University of Groningen). All these research schools are accredited by the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW). The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a review of Professor Slawomir Magala’s contributions as editor of Journal of Organizational Change Management.

Findings

Slawomir (Slawek) Magala will be known for many contributions to social, organizational, managerial research, and it will be remembered that he has created a great legacy in the field of cross-cultural competence and communication on processes of sense making in professional bureaucracies. He has authored and co-authored many publications including articles, books, professional publications, book contributions and other outputs, and is an established professor of cross-cultural management at the Department of Organization and Personnel Management in RSM, Erasmus University. He will be known for his work as editor of Qualitative Sociology Review, and one of the founding members of the Association for Cross-Cultural Competence in Management, not to mention the Journal of Organizational Change Management. Many of his articles have appeared regularly in leading refereed journals, such as the European Journal of International Management, Public Policy, Critical Perspectives on International Business and Human Resources Development International. His greatest legacy is in the field of cross-cultural management, but branches out to many other management studies.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited to his work in capacity of editor of Journal of Organizational Change Management.

Practical implications

This review provides a guide for positive role model of an excellent editorship of a journal.

Social implications

Magala’s legacy acknowledges this research and its power to create numerous papers and attract a lot of attention (Flory and Magala, 2014). Because of these conferences, these empirical findings have led to disseminating the conference findings with JOCM (Flory and Magala, 2014). According to them, narrative research has become a respectable research method, but they also feel that it is still burdened with a lot of controversies on with difficulties linked to applying it across different disciplines (Flory and Magala, 2014).

Originality/value

The review covers the creative accomplishment of Professor Magala as editor.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Melanie Williams

John Cotton Automotive realised that it needed to change the company's culture to one of growth in order to survive.

Abstract

John Cotton Automotive realised that it needed to change the company's culture to one of growth in order to survive.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Karen Renaud, Stephen Flowerday, Rosanne English and Melanie Volkamer

The purpose of this study was to identify to identify reasons for the lack of protest against dragnet surveillance in the UK. As part of this investigation, a study was carried…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to identify to identify reasons for the lack of protest against dragnet surveillance in the UK. As part of this investigation, a study was carried out to gauge the understanding of “privacy” and “confidentiality” by the well-informed.

Design/methodology/approach

To perform a best-case study, the authors identified a group of well-informed participants in terms of security. To gain insights into their privacy-related mental models, they were asked first to define the three core terms and then to identify the scenarios. Then, the participants were provided with privacy-related scenarios and were asked to demonstrate their understanding by classifying the scenarios and identifying violations.

Findings

Although the participants were mostly able to identify privacy and confidentiality scenarios, they experienced difficulties in articulating the actual meaning of the terms privacy, confidentiality and security.

Research limitations/implications

There were a limited number of participants, yet the findings are interesting and justify further investigation. The implications, even of this initial study, are significant in that if citizens’ privacy rights are being violated and they did not seem to know how to protest this and if indeed they had the desire to do so.

Practical implications

Had the citizens understood the meaning of privacy, and their ancient right thereto, which is enshrined in law, their response to the Snowden revelations about ongoing wide-scale surveillance might well have been more strident and insistent.

Originality/value

People in the UK, where this study was carried out, do not seem to protest the privacy invasion effected by dragnet surveillance with any verve. The authors identify a number of possible reasons for this from the literature. One possible explanation is that people do not understand privacy. Thus, this study posits that privacy is unusual in that understanding does not seem to align with the ability to articulate the rights to privacy and their disapproval of such widespread surveillance. This seems to make protests unlikely.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Thomas J. Caruso, Juan Luis Sandin Marquez, Melanie S. Gipp, Stephen P. Kelleher and Paul J. Sharek

No studies have examined preoperative handoffs from the intensive care unit (ICU) to OR. Given the risk of patient harm, the authors developed a standardized ICU to OR handoff…

1024

Abstract

Purpose

No studies have examined preoperative handoffs from the intensive care unit (ICU) to OR. Given the risk of patient harm, the authors developed a standardized ICU to OR handoff using a previously published handoff model. The purpose of this paper is to determine whether a standardized ICU to OR handoff process would increase the number of team handoffs and improve patient transport readiness.

Design/methodology/approach

The intervention consisted of designing a multidisciplinary, face-to-face handoff between sending ICU providers and receiving anesthesiologist and OR nurse, verbally presented in the I-PASS format. Anticipatory calls from the OR nurse to the ICU nurse were made to prepare the patient for transport. Data collected included frequency of handoff, patient transport readiness, turnover time between OR cases, and anesthesia provider satisfaction.

Findings

In total, 57 audits were completed. The frequency of handoffs increased from 25 to 86 percent (p<0.0001) and the frequency of patient readiness increased from 61 to 97 percent (p=0.001). There were no changes in timeliness of first start cases and no significant change in turnover times between cases. Anesthesia provider satisfaction scores increased significantly.

Practical implications

A standardized, team based ICU to OR handoff increased the frequency of face-to-face handoffs, patient readiness and anesthesia provider satisfaction within increasing turnover between cases.

Originality/value

Although studies have identified the transition of patients from the ICU to the OR as a period of increased harm, the development of a preoperative ICU to OR handoff had not been described. This intervention may be used in other institutions to design ICU to OR transitions of care.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 October 2017

Joy Parkinson, Chris Dubelaar, Julia Carins, Stephen Holden, Fiona Newton and Melanie Pescud

The purpose of this paper is to focus on food consumption as part of the wicked problem of obesity. Specifically, the authors seek to explore the complex interplay between…

2080

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on food consumption as part of the wicked problem of obesity. Specifically, the authors seek to explore the complex interplay between stakeholders such as food producers, marketers, health and medical practitioners and policymakers and their influence on the ways in which individuals consume food and also chart a course forward using a systems approach, social marketing techniques and social enterprise to develop solutions to effect change.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper that proposes the food system compass to understand the complex interplay between stakeholders.

Findings

This new tool will provide social marketers with an improved understanding of the complexity of interactions between stakeholders and outcomes and integrating the necessity for coordination within and across micro, meso, exo and macro levels of the system as well as across sectors, institutions and stakeholders.

Research limitations/implications

This is a conceptual paper and proposes the food system compass which offers a foundation for future research to expand upon.

Originality/value

This paper seeks to advance the theoretical base of social marketing by providing new insights into the trans-disciplinary and dynamic circumstances surrounding food consumption and obesity and highlights leverage points where joint actions can be facilitated with actors across and between micro, meso, exo and macro levels.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 September 2021

Matthew J. Johnson, Ki Ho Kim, Stephen M. Colarelli and Melanie Boyajian

The purpose of this research was to develop a conceptualization and measure of workplace coachability.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research was to develop a conceptualization and measure of workplace coachability.

Design/methodology/approach

Using four independent samples of employed adults, we developed a short and long version of the Coachability Scale. We followed standard scale development practices, presenting evidence of the scales’ factor structure, reliability and validity.

Findings

With the first two samples, we derived an initial three-dimensional version of the Coachability Scale and provided evidence of convergent validity. With Samples 3 and 4, we expanded the scale with additional dimensions related to coaching feedback processes and accumulated additional evidence of the scale's validity, and provided evidence of convergence between the two versions of the Coachability Scale.

Research limitations/implications

We encourage continued research on the Coachability Scale, as well as research on coachability in formal coaching relationships and with more diverse populations and cultures. It is also important to examine how coachability relates to specific coachee behaviors and outcomes. Although common method bias may be a limitation, we used temporally separated measurements to minimize method bias in Sample 4.

Practical implications

Knowledge about coachability can inform coaching practice decisions and help tailor the coaching engagement to better fit the coachee's needs.

Social implications

Measuring how individuals respond to coaching and coaching relationships has important implications for managerial behavior and the quality of work life.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to develop valid scales for assessing workplace coachability.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 40 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 January 2008

Stephen Gilligan and Melanie Walters

The purpose of ths paper is to report that timely interventions to facilitate medical patient flow and reduce medical outliers may be associated with a reduction in hospital…

1691

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of ths paper is to report that timely interventions to facilitate medical patient flow and reduce medical outliers may be associated with a reduction in hospital mortality.

Design/methodology/approach

Interventions to improve the flow of medical patients were used to unblock and facilitate the discharge process allowing a reduction in medical outliers. SPC run charts of mortality were used to quality control the changes.

Findings

Timeliness in daily senior medical review and discharge planning, a level 1 medical ward, and outreach including ALERT training and early warning scoring allowed a rationalisation in medical beds and a reduction in mortality for emergency medical admissions, reflected in a lower hospital standarised mortality rate (HSMR).

Practical implications

Interventions to improve flow can also lead to a reduction in mortality.

Originality/value

This paper emphasises how quantitative flow improvements can also generate qualitative improvements.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

1 – 10 of 113