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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2021

William E. Donald, Melanie J. Ashleigh and Yehuda Baruch

The purpose of this study is to understand how universities and organizations have responded to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in terms of preparing university students and…

1914

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to understand how universities and organizations have responded to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in terms of preparing university students and recent graduates to enter the global labor market, using the accounting, banking and finance sector as a case study. The two research questions are (1) How can university career services and organizations work individually and collaboratively to best develop early career talent following the COVID-19 pandemic? (2) What are the challenges that university career services and organizations face when working individually or collaboratively to develop early career talent following the COVID-19 pandemic?

Design/methodology/approach

The data for thematic analysis comes from 36 semi-structured interviews with career advisors (CAs) (n = 19) and graduate recruiters (GRs) (n = 17).

Findings

This study offers some of the first findings on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, helping to ensure that organizational behavior and career theory literature reflect the dramatically changing landscape in the university-to-work transition.

Originality/value

Theoretically, our contribution comes from applying a framework of the career construction theory (CTT) within the context of a career ecosystem to understand the views of the intermediary, meso-level actors, which, to date, have lacked representation within career literature. Practically, we provide an insightful bridge between universities and organizations, offering opportunities for greater collaboration, and enhanced outcomes for all stakeholders.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 51 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 October 2018

William E. Donald, Melanie J. Ashleigh and Yehuda Baruch

The purpose of this paper is to understand how students perceive their future careers and how university has prepared them to enter the global labor market; student perceptions…

7899

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand how students perceive their future careers and how university has prepared them to enter the global labor market; student perceptions regarding benefits vs associated costs of pursuing higher education (HE) on employability and earnings; and the anticipated barriers and how to overcome these in pursuit of career sustainability within a career ecosystem.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopted a qualitative method using semi-structured interviews on a small sample of 38 final year students from a UK university who were also participants in an earlier two-wave quantitative survey, which was conducted with 387 penultimate and final year undergraduates from the same UK-based University.

Findings

Findings revealed that undergraduates perceive their investment in HE to offer a net financial gain; however, this is narrowing due to increased tuition fees, associated student debt and interest payments eroding earning premiums. As undergraduates progress, they feel more employable from a personal perspective, but less employable from a market perspective due to competition for graduate jobs and the cost/benefit conflict of resources.

Practical implications

The authors provide nine opportunities for enhancing the employability of graduates collaborating with graduate employers, providing a timely contribution to the social, political and economic debate on the funding of HE.

Originality/value

The authors advance career theory via the new perspective of Career Ecosystem Theory by: explaining student career perceptions in terms of how university has prepared them for the global labor market; exploring the perceived costs vs benefits of pursuing HE in relation to employability; suggesting a two-dimensional model of personal and market factors of employability; providing a model of careers advice from employers and universities for supporting students’ careers; and offering policy implications in relation to the future funding of HE and employability of future graduates.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 December 2019

William E. Donald, Yehuda Baruch and Melanie J. Ashleigh

The purpose of this paper is to conceptually articulate the differing needs of graduates and graduate employers, which can be competing or complementary in nature. Drawing from…

1411

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conceptually articulate the differing needs of graduates and graduate employers, which can be competing or complementary in nature. Drawing from theoretical frameworks of career ecosystems and the new psychological contract, a set of propositions are presented using three themes: career management, development of talent and technological change.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual design offering a conceptual model through adopting the career ecosystem and new psychological contract as a framework.

Findings

These propositions offer a new conceptual model, which provides a practical contribution by articulating sustainability of graduates’ careers through employability at the graduate level and competitive advantage at the employer level.

Originality/value

The paper offers important contributions to theory by connecting career management and vocational career literature through acknowledging shared constructs of life-long learning and sustainable employability for graduates. These two streams are often developed in parallel, thus this paper helps to bridge the gaps in respective research agendas. This paper therefore has the originality of helping to advance the fields of career theory and sustainable human resource management.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 May 2019

Sarah Leidner, Denise Baden and Melanie J. Ashleigh

The purpose of this paper is to explore how Green (environmental) Human Resource Management (GHRM) policies can elicit green employee behaviours. This study explores the role of…

2054

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how Green (environmental) Human Resource Management (GHRM) policies can elicit green employee behaviours. This study explores the role of sustainability advocates, who are leaders and managers in pursuit of their firm’s environmental agenda, in the design and delivery of GHRM policies, communication, recruitment and selection, environmental training, rewards and incentives.

Design/methodology/approach

In this qualitative study, eighteen semi-structured interviews with sustainability advocates in European firms were conducted and analysed.

Findings

GHRM practices are not in themselves peripheral, intermediate or embedded, but shaped by contextual situations. Sustainability advocates’ intentions do not seem to match GHRM policy design, i.e. they try to elicit value-based behaviours by using self-interest-based approaches, leading to misalignments between the attitudes and behaviours policies attempt to elicit, and the type of behaviours they elicit in practice.

Research limitations/implications

This study explores GHRM practice implementation experienced by leaders and managers. Further research on the role of the HR function and recipients of GHRM is needed.

Practical implications

Practitioners need to be aware that organisational incentives (GHRM policies) that reflect self-interest can lead to self-interest-based behaviour and may be short-lived. A careful consideration of contextual factors will inform the selection of suitable GHRM policies. Environmental training completion rates seem an unsuitable metric for senior management bonuses.

Originality/value

This paper investigates the design and implementation stage of GHRM, leading to an identification of GHRM policies as peripheral, intermediate or embedded. This creates an in-depth knowledge on the efficacy of GHRM policies and their relation to the environment.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 48 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 2 August 2023

Abstract

Details

The Emerald International Handbook of Feminist Perspectives on Women’s Acts of Violence
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-255-6

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Fiona Lettice

325

Abstract

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Fiona Lettice

578

Abstract

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Abstract

Details

The Emerald International Handbook of Feminist Perspectives on Women’s Acts of Violence
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-255-6

Article
Publication date: 27 July 2021

William E. Donald

This paper offers a “content analysis of metadata, titles, and abstracts” (CAMTA) method underpinned by a newly evolved metadata, title, abstract, introduction, methodology…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper offers a “content analysis of metadata, titles, and abstracts” (CAMTA) method underpinned by a newly evolved metadata, title, abstract, introduction, methodology, results, analysis, and discussion (M-TAIMRAD) Framework.

Design/methodology/approach

Draws on innovations of content analysis from the field of health- care to offer a pragmatic and transparent method for conducting rigorous and valid research within the field of business and management.

Findings

Replicable and valid guidelines for conducting the CAMTA method are offered, including an illustration. This is followed by a critical examination of the potential applications and benefits of the method to the field of business and management research.

Originality/value

The CAMTA method enables researchers to assimilate and synthesise metadata, titles and abstracts as a means of identifying grounds for future research and theory development. This will help to advance the field and subsequently benefit the wider readership including fellow academics, practitioners and policymakers. The flexibility of the CAMTA method means that it can be used as a stand-alone method or combined as part of a mixed-methods approach.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 45 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 June 2019

Marina Latukha, Joseph Soyiri, Mariia Shagalkina and Liana Rysakova

The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, the authors aim to examine the role of talent management (TM) practices in talent migration from developed countries to Ghana that may…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, the authors aim to examine the role of talent management (TM) practices in talent migration from developed countries to Ghana that may enhance country’s economic development through knowledge transfer. The paper also investigates the determinants of migration to the African countries.

Design/methodology/approach

Discussing the importance of self-initiated expatriates (SIEs), and how TM practices may contribute to global migration, the authors develop a set of propositions and build a theoretical framework showing how firms from Ghana can push SIEs to a longer stay in Ghana stimulating inward migration by implementing TM practices.

Findings

The authors claim that in the Ghanaian context expatriates may become migrants by overcoming negative perceptions about Ghana as a destination. Besides the authors argue that talent attraction and talent retention practices with governmental support, play an important role in inward migration to Ghana.

Research limitations/implications

New agenda for talent managers in Africa, namely addressing the possibilities for expatriates’ retention by developing and implementing TM practices to ensure knowledge transferring from developed countries is suggested.

Originality/value

The theoretical framework provides a useful starting point for explaining the interconnections of TM and the conversion from expatriation to the global migration phenomena by African countries that broaden the TM scope beyond individual and organizational aspects. The authors state that TM systems take on the principal role of addressing talent migration especially in the African context and are capable of converting expatriates, specifically SIEs, into migrants to solve important tasks related to knowledge attraction to developing countries.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

Keywords

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