Search results

1 – 5 of 5
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 August 2019

Michelle L. Pickett, Joi Wickliffe, Amanda Emerson, Sharla Smith and Megha Ramaswamy

The purpose of this paper is to gain insight into justice-involved women’s preferences for an internet-based Sexual Health Empowerment (SHE) curriculum.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain insight into justice-involved women’s preferences for an internet-based Sexual Health Empowerment (SHE) curriculum.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyzed data from four focus groups conducted with 52 women in a minimum-security county jail in a Midwestern US city.

Findings

Women reported daily access to the internet while in the community and use of the internet for searching about health concerns. Four themes emerged in the discussion about preferences for an internet-based SHE curriculum, that it cover healthy sexual expression, how to access resources, video as an educational modality and a non-judgmental approach.

Practical implications

Justice-involved women are potentially reachable through internet-based health education. Their preferences for content and modality can be used to inform internet-based sexual health programming designed specifically for this population. Using this modality could offer easily disseminated, low-cost and consistent messaging about sexual health for a vulnerable group of women.

Originality/value

Though internet-based health education programming has been widely utilized in the general population, less attention has been paid to if and how these programs could be utilized with a vulnerable group of women who move between the justice system and communities. This exploratory study begins to fill that gap.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 April 2020

Ashlyn Lipnicky, Patricia J. Kelly and Megha Ramaswamy

The purpose of this study is to measure Facebook (FB) use as a tool for maintaining research contact with hard-to-reach women with criminal justice histories.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to measure Facebook (FB) use as a tool for maintaining research contact with hard-to-reach women with criminal justice histories.

Design/methodology/approach

Retrospective data were analyzed from a jail health intervention. Bivariate analysis compared the rates of follow-up between FB group users and non-FB group users at one post-intervention time point. Multivariate models explored predictors for FB group follow-up.

Findings

Among 184 participants, 89 (48.4%) used the private research FB group. This group was more likely to complete the follow-up survey one year after enrollment compared to non-FB group users (P = 0.002). Regression analyses showed that, compared to non-FB group users, FB group users were more likely to be younger and have a history of sexually transmitted infections.

Practical implications

FB is popular among women with criminal justice histories. Use of this social media site with study participants from hard-to-reach populations may enhance study retention.

Originality/value

This paper fills a gap in examining the long-term use of FB as a research strategy to maintain contain with typically hard-to-reach populations.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Tyson Pankey and Megha Ramaswamy

– The purpose of this paper is to explore incarcerated women's awareness, beliefs, and experiences with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and vaccination.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore incarcerated women's awareness, beliefs, and experiences with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and vaccination.

Design/methodology/approach

Researchers conducted focus groups with 45 incarcerated women in an urban Midwestern US jail to assess how women talked about their Papanicolaou (Pap) test screening and abnormal Pap test follow-up experiences. Some focus group questions specifically assessed individual awareness, beliefs, and experiences with HPV infection and vaccination. Based on these data, the authors described participants’ awareness of HPV, as well as used open coding to ultimately extract themes related to beliefs and experiences with HPV infection and vaccine.

Findings

While all 45 participants reported experiencing an abnormal Pap test event within the last five years, only two-thirds of participants (n=30) reported having heard of the HPV infection. Several themes emerged from the analysis of the data: the women's beliefs about cause and severity of HPV; frustration with age requirements of the vaccine; varied experiences with vaccinations for themselves and their children; the impact of media exposure on knowledge; and desire for more HPV infection and vaccine information.

Originality/value

Incarcerated women's awareness and limited experiences with HPV infection and vaccination may be a barrier to adequate screening and cervical cancer prevention. This study has implications for the development of cervical health education for this high-risk group of women, who are four to five times as likely to have cervical cancer as non-incarcerated women.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Morag MacDonald, Robert Greifinger and David Kane

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 May 2021

Ishita Batra, Megha Gupta and Sanjay Dhir

The last two decades have witnessed a substantial increase in the body of research on the theoretical perspective of the performance of international joint ventures…

Abstract

Purpose

The last two decades have witnessed a substantial increase in the body of research on the theoretical perspective of the performance of international joint ventures (IJVs). However, the evidence on the antecedents of IJVs performance is inconsistent. The purpose of this paper is to critically review the quantitative studies on the antecedents of the performance of IJVs to identify the research gaps in this area and to prepare a future research agenda using the theory, context, characteristics and methodology (TCCM) framework.

Design/methodology/approach

Meta-Analysis review is conducted on 97 papers from A*, A and B category journals from the Australian Business Deans Council (ABDC) Journal Quality List.

Findings

The results reveal the homogeneity in antecedents such as administrative distance, BOD (board of directors) involvement, resource interdependency, flexibility, learning, competitive overlap, cultural distance, R&D (research and development) intensity, contract, relatedness, the existence of a local IJVs partner, trust, operational experience, partners capability, size asymmetry, goal congruency, capital adequacy, economic distance and heterogeneity in the antecedents such as equity ownership, commitment, control, cooperation and conflict are heterogeneous.

Originality/value

This review seeks to provide deeper insights, which help us to contribute toward the development of the research field of antecedents of the performance of IJVs. The authors have synthesized 97 independent samples with a total sample size of 52,268.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

1 – 5 of 5