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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2020

Megan Reitz, Lee Waller, Michael Chaskalson, Sharon Olivier and Silke Rupprecht

The study's objective was to examine whether and how mindfulness training and practice might impact indicators of three capacities identified as critical for leading in…

Abstract

Purpose

The study's objective was to examine whether and how mindfulness training and practice might impact indicators of three capacities identified as critical for leading in the twenty-first century: resilience, leading in complex contexts and collaboration.

Design/methodology/approach

We conducted a non-randomised wait-list controlled study with 57 senior leaders (81 per cent female) who undertook an eight-week “Mindful Leader” programme.

Findings

Our findings suggest the programme was effective in developing leaders in terms of their mindfulness, resilience and self-perceived leadership competencies such as collaboration and agility in complex situations. The amount of mindfulness practice the leaders undertook was associated with improvements in mindfulness, resilience and collaboration. Furthermore, participants reported that the programme was beneficial for them as leaders and that the training format was feasible. However, objective measures of cognitive functioning and leadership competence did not improve significantly within the mindfulness intervention group.

Practical implications

Mindfulness practice may be a promising and effective method for leader development. Our results suggest that mindfulness can be learnt and developed by executive leaders, as long as they practice for at least 10 min per day.

Originality/value

This is the first study to investigate how resilience, leading in complex contexts and collaboration can be developed through mindfulness training.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Lee Waller, Megan Reitz, Eve Poole, Patricia M. Riddell and Angela Muir

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether challenging experiences on development programmes would simulate leadership challenges and therefore stimulate the body’s…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether challenging experiences on development programmes would simulate leadership challenges and therefore stimulate the body’s autonomic nervous system response. The authors also aimed to determine whether increase in autonomic arousal would be related to learning, and/or moderated by personality variables.

Design/methodology/approach

The research used heart rate (HR) monitors to measure HR continuously over a two-day simulated learning experience. This was used to calculate autonomic arousal which was taken to be the difference between resting HR measured during sleep and HR during critical incidents (CIs) (HR). The authors correlated this with self-reports of learning immediately after, and one month after, the programme to assess the impact of autonomic arousal on perceived learning, as well as with variety of psychometric measures.

Findings

The research found significant correlations between (HR) during CIs and perceived learning which were not related to personality type. The research also found a significant correlation between (HR) and learning during a control event for individuals with “approach” personalities.

Research limitations/implications

Whilst a significant result was found, the sample size of 28 was small. The research also did not empirically assess the valence or intensity of the emotions experienced, and used only a self-report measure of learning. Future research should replicate the findings with a larger sample size, attempt to measure these emotional dimensions, as well as obtain perceptions of learning from direct reports and line managers.

Practical implications

The findings from the research help clarify the mechanisms involved in the effectiveness of experiential learning, and contribute to the understanding of the influence of personality type on perceived learning from experiential methodologies. Such understanding has implications for business schools and learning and development professionals, suggesting that development experiences that challenge leaders are likely to result in learning that is longer lasting.

Originality/value

The research extends the literature regarding the value of learning through experience, the role of autonomic arousal on learning, and the impact of negative emotions on cognition. The research makes a unique contribution by exploring the impact of experience on arousal and learning in a simulated learning experience and over time, by demonstrating that simulated experiences induce emotional and physiological responses, and that these experiences are associated with increased learning.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2007

Megan Reitz, Melissa Carr and Eddie Blass

This paper examines ongoing research (Blass & Carr, 2006) exploring the development of future leaders using new and innovative approaches. Research asking experienced…

Abstract

This paper examines ongoing research (Blass & Carr, 2006) exploring the development of future leaders using new and innovative approaches. Research asking experienced leaders about what they wish they had known 10 years ago is used to provide an insight into the critical incidents that shaped these leaders' careers. These critical incidents were used as the basis for an innovative leadership development programme for the Improvement and Development Agency (IDeA) which is further examined in this paper.

Details

International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2020

How do you feel when you read the word ‘mindfulness’? For some, it will be a welcome reminder that they should be more mindful of everything that is going on inside and…

Abstract

Purpose

How do you feel when you read the word ‘mindfulness’? For some, it will be a welcome reminder that they should be more mindful of everything that is going on inside and outside their heads, and lead almost instantly to a state of calm and heightened awareness – which is, of course, what is should do as that what the word and practice of mindfulness means. For others, however, reactions can vary widely. Some will be completely non-plussed having never read up on the subject, and for others, they may sneer at the latest wishy-washy, mumbo-jumbo that has started to fill up Facebook feeds and cards from Hallmark stores. And for a few, the reaction may be the very opposite of what is intended, reacting violently to a belief and state of mind they are predisposed to dislike intensely.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds his/her own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

How do you feel when you read the word ‘mindfulness’? For some, it will be a welcome reminder that they should be more mindful of everything that is going on inside and outside their heads, and lead almost instantly to a state of calm and heightened awareness – which is, of course, what is should do as that what the word and practice of mindfulness means. For others, however, reactions can vary widely. Some will be completely non-plussed having never read up on the subject, and for others, they may sneer at the latest wishy-washy, mumbo-jumbo that has started to fill up Facebook feeds and cards from Hallmark stores. And for a few, the reaction may be the very opposite of what is intended, reacting violently to a belief and state of mind they are predisposed to dislike intensely.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2007

Graham Towl

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Lee Waller, Carla Millar and Vicki Culpin

Abstract

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Book part
Publication date: 6 November 2018

Alessandro Corda

Collateral consequences (CCs) of criminal convictions such as disenfranchisement, occupational restrictions, exclusions from public housing, and loss of welfare benefits…

Abstract

Collateral consequences (CCs) of criminal convictions such as disenfranchisement, occupational restrictions, exclusions from public housing, and loss of welfare benefits represent one of the salient yet hidden features of the contemporary American penal state. This chapter explores, from a comparative and historical perspective, the rise of the many indirect “regulatory” sanctions flowing from a conviction and discusses some of the unique challenges they pose for legal and policy reform. US jurisprudence and policies are contrasted with the more stringent approach adopted by European legal systems and the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) in safeguarding the often blurred line between criminal punishments and formally civil sanctions. The aim of this chapter is twofold: (1) to contribute to a better understanding of the overreliance of the US criminal justice systems on CCs as a device of social exclusion and control, and (2) to put forward constructive and viable reform proposals aimed at reinventing the role and operation of collateral restrictions flowing from criminal convictions.

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