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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2022

Megan Lee Endres and Sanjib K. Chowdhury

The purpose of this study is to apply the motivation–opportunity–ability (MOA) framework to investigate the relationships between ambiguity tolerance (AT), reflective thinking…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to apply the motivation–opportunity–ability (MOA) framework to investigate the relationships between ambiguity tolerance (AT), reflective thinking (RT) and performance in a complex task to predict knowledge-sharing intent.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, 190 subjects performed a complex scheduling task in which they were randomly assigned to either participate in RT or not.

Findings

Results show that factors of the MOA framework positively predicted knowledge-sharing intent. In addition, RT significantly increased intention to share for individuals with low performance or with low AT.

Research limitations/implications

More research is needed to determine relationships between complex task performance and knowledge sharing, and the role of learning strategies, particularly self-directed ones such as RT. Future studies may use a larger sample size for more complex analysis.

Practical implications

RT may be used to create a sustainable and low-cost method of increasing knowledge sharing in complex tasks, without which those with low AT or low performance may not have participated.

Originality/value

The study supports the importance of contextual influences and points to how organizations can use RT in addition to individual motivation and ability to encourage knowledge sharing.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 34 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Megan Lee Endres and Kyle T. Rhoad

Knowledge sharing is an important individual behavior that benefits teams and organizations. However, little is known about environments with both team and individual rewards. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge sharing is an important individual behavior that benefits teams and organizations. However, little is known about environments with both team and individual rewards. The purpose of this study is to investigate high-ability team members’ knowledge sharing in an environment with both team and individual rewards. The motivation, opportunity and ability framework was specifically applied to a work situation with face-to-face interaction and objective performance measures.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were gathered from college baseball players in varied regions of the USA.

Findings

Unexpectedly, individual ability was negatively related to individual knowledge sharing. However, as pro-sharing norms increased, all players reported higher knowledge sharing, especially the highest-ability players.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include that the sample is small and team members were not from the same teams, prohibiting aggregation to a higher level of analysis. The study is cross-sectional and self-reported, as well. The sample was homogeneous and young.

Practical implications

In work environments where rewards are both individual- and team-based, the high performers may ignore team knowledge sharing because they are more successful working as individuals.

Social implications

In work environments where rewards are both individual- and team-based, the high performers may ignore team knowledge sharing because they are more successful working as individuals. Development of pro-sharing norms can be critical for encouraging these team members with the potential to have a strong impact on the lower-performing team members, as well as to inspire further knowledge sharing.

Originality/value

The baseball team member sample is unique because of the team and individual performance aspects that include objective ability measures.

Details

Team Performance Management, vol. 22 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 June 2007

Megan Lee Endres, Steven P. Endres, Sanjib K. Chowdhury and Intakhab Alam

The purpose of this paper is to apply the self‐efficacy model to compare knowledge‐sharing activities in the Open Source community versus those in a traditional organization.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply the self‐efficacy model to compare knowledge‐sharing activities in the Open Source community versus those in a traditional organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Current literature on tacit knowledge sharing and information about the Open Source community is synthesized in the study with research concerning self‐efficacy formation. The knowledge‐sharing literature is applied in the paper to the self‐efficacy model.

Findings

Through a synthesis of different streams of literature, the paper concludes that the self‐efficacy model serves as a useful framework for better understanding the effects of context on tacit knowledge sharing. Furthermore, it is concluded that the Open Source community may provide an ideal set of subjects to whom the model can be applied.

Research limitations/implications

Only propositions are offered, and the conclusions are suggestions for future research. The self‐efficacy model has been successfully applied to other areas of research in early stages (e.g. entrepreneurship) and provides a valid, tangible framework that allows many research possibilities.

Practical implications

The self‐efficacy model is practical and usable in a real‐world situation. A software manager (or other manager) can easily look at the inputs and outcomes of the model and see where he/she could positively affect tacit knowledge sharing.

Originality/value

This paper takes a highly valid and respected model and applies it to individual tacit knowledge sharing, a field in which little cross‐discipline work is done. This paper bridges a central organizational behavior/psychological theory with knowledge management research.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 June 2007

Rory L. Chase

688

Abstract

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Ali Intezari, Nazim Taskin and David J. Pauleen

This study aims to identify the main knowledge processes associated with organizational knowledge culture. A diverse range of knowledge processes have been referred to in the…

5466

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify the main knowledge processes associated with organizational knowledge culture. A diverse range of knowledge processes have been referred to in the extant literature, but little agreement exists on which knowledge processes are critical and should be supported by organizational culture.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a systematic literature review methodology, this study examined the primary literature – peer-reviewed and scholarly articles published in the top seven knowledge management and intellectual capital (KM/IC)-related journals.

Findings

The core knowledge processes have been identified – knowledge sharing, knowledge creation and knowledge implementation. The paper suggests that a strategy for implementing successful organizational KM initiatives requires precise understanding and effective management of the core knowledge infrastructures and processes. Although technology infrastructure is an important aspect of any KM initiative, the integration of knowledge into management decisions and practices relies on the extent to which the organizational culture supports or hinders knowledge processes.

Research limitations/implications

The focus of the study was on the articles published in the top seven KM/IC journals; important contributions in relevant publications in other KM journals, conference papers, books and professional reports may have been excluded.

Practical implications

Practitioners will benefit from a better understanding of knowledge processes involved in KM initiatives and investments. From a managerial perspective, the study offers an overview of the state of organizational knowledge culture research and suggests that for KM initiatives to be successful, the organization requires an integrated culture that is concerned with knowledge processes as a set of inextricably inter-related processes.

Originality/value

For the first time, a comprehensive list of diverse terms used in describing knowledge processes has been identified. The findings remove the conceptual ambiguity resulting from the inconsistent use of different terms for the same knowledge process by identifying the three major and overarching knowledge processes. Moreover, this study points to the need to attend to the inextricably interrelated nature of these three knowledge processes. Finally, this is the first time that a study provides evidence that shows the KM studies appear to be biased towards Knowledge sharing.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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