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Case study
Publication date: 27 April 2021

Vinit Vijay Dani and Meeta Dasgupta

The learning outcomes of this paper is as follows: to showcase how a futuristic mission and planned branding initiatives can help start-up social enterprise to create a…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes of this paper is as follows: to showcase how a futuristic mission and planned branding initiatives can help start-up social enterprise to create a successful brand; to explain how a comprehensive understanding of the target group and innovative products/services and channel strategies help GoBhaarati position itself as an upcoming not for profit social enterprise; to argue how proper brand mission and branding can help even a small startup to create a brand identity in a fiercely competitive fragmented market dominated by big players; the constraints GoBhaarati faced in constituting and aligning distribution channel. These impulsions can have legal, environmental and or managerial foundations.

Case overview/synopsis

GoBhaarati Agro Industries and Private Limited (GoBhaarati) operated as a nonprofit social enterprise in the Health and Wellness Industry, providing natural indigenous traditional Indian products such as millets, honey, turmeric, jaggery, rock salt and serving millet-based snacks to consumers. At the epicenter of Gobhaarati's branding strategy was its health and wellness positioning. The company's mission was to increase the positive perception of millets and to convince consumers that there was intrinsic value in a product's origin and production processes. Iriventi aimed to achieve a turnover of at least ten crores by 2025, but the company's sales and financial resources were limited. With this clouding in mind, Iriventi could not decide whether to let GoBhaarati stay niche in business or to expand it organically.

Complexity academic level

Graduate and executive management education students can use the case. The case may also be used to focus on entrepreneurship and distribution management for start-up social enterprises.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 8: Marketing.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 27 April 2021

Pravat Surya Kar and Meeta Dasgupta

Appreciate changing contours of business to business (B2B) purchase and how sellers should adapt their selling style and promotions.

Abstract

Learning outcomes

Appreciate changing contours of business to business (B2B) purchase and how sellers should adapt their selling style and promotions.

Case overview/synopsis

In the past two decades, imaging Goa (IG) and Azim Shaikh had weathered many business crises. However, as the COVID 19 pandemic unfolded, he became aware of critical fault lines in his B2B selling model. IG offered customised digital display solutions, but its primary source of revenue was B2B selling of interactive flat panel display (IFPD) devices. It, respectively, controlled about 35% and 3% of the market share of IFPD sales, respectively, in Goa and western India. IG’s success in the B2B segment was because of Shaikh’s ability to build strong relationships and customised solutions in an emerging market context. To deal with the COVID pandemic, the Indian Government had imposed a country-wide lockdown, which forced organisations to adopt work from home. This, in turn, created a pull for IFPDs. Yet, very soon Shaikh realised, in the new normal, there was a growing mismatch between his selling efforts and outcomes. Though overall revenue had not fallen much, but the veteran seller had started doubting his tried and tested relational solution selling model. Case dilemma involves the selection of appropriate selling approaches e.g. solution, insight or tiebreaker selling for different situations. This case also offers an opportunity to discuss, how to use online channels to complement B2B selling.

Complexity Academic Level

This teaching case study is suitable for the graduate-level programme in marketing management.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 8: Marketing

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 1 April 2011

Meeta Dasgupta

Strategic management and management of innovation and technology.

Abstract

Subject area

Strategic management and management of innovation and technology.

Study level/applicability

The course can be used for undergraduate and postgraduate students. The case would be relevant in the strategic management course to understand the concept of technology strategy and the various evaluation parameters guiding firms in their technology decisions. A refresher of the concept of value chain analysis can also be done through the case. It can also be used to teach innovation and technology management to understand the innovation process and the importance of various organizational factors for taking technology decisions.

Case overview

The case tries to bring together different aspects of technological innovation and technology strategy at North Delhi Power Ltd, Delhi which has taken various initiatives to turnaround the dilapidated power distribution industry in India. It details the various technological initiatives taken by the company to revamp the power distribution situation of the country. Discussion in the case also revolves around the technology decisions (technology strategy) taken by the company to drive the technological initiatives. The organizational culture supporting technology decisions and the technological initiatives are also woven into the case.

Expected learning outcomes

After a discussion on the case students will be in a better position to appreciate various decisions which firms take with respect to technology. They will get an understanding of what is technological innovation and about the technological innovation process. The importance of organizational factors to supplement technology decisions and innovation will be brought out in the case.

Supplementary materials

Teaching note.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2021

Vishnu Chandar Venkatesh, Meeta Dasgupta, Anupama Prashar and Torben Juul Andersen

Turbulent hypercompetitive market conditions make small and medium enterprises (SMEs) vulnerable to abrupt crises caused by unexpected competitor moves. In these…

Abstract

Purpose

Turbulent hypercompetitive market conditions make small and medium enterprises (SMEs) vulnerable to abrupt crises caused by unexpected competitor moves. In these situations, enterprise risk management (ERM) can serve as a dynamic capability (DC) to overcome the impending crisis and improve SMEs' survival rates. To explore this capacity, which has only been vaguely addressed in prior research, we conduct an exploratory, abductive study to update the extant (ERM and DC) literature with empirical evidence from expert interviews.

Design/methodology/approach

We conduct an exploratory, abductive study using empirical evidence from expert interviews.

Findings

Our findings reveal ERM as a second-order DC in the micro-foundational components of competitive intelligence gathering, alliance building and integrative capabilities. We find that competitive intensity and government policy moderate the effects of these foundational capabilities. Finally, our study proposes a survivability model that provides new valuable knowledge of ERM as a DC for SMEs to deal with competition-driven crises.

Originality/value

This research survivability model shows how ERM as DC can facilitate the survivability of SMEs against competitive surprises. Although restricted to crises arising out of competitive surprises, this study provides valuable knowledge to the literature on what type of DCs are useful for specific situations. The study findings not only extended Teece's (2007) DCs framework to competitive crises but also placed it within a hierarchy of capabilities. The research findings indicate that an ERM culture in SMEs promote the growth and development of sensing, seizing and reconfiguring capabilities, vital for tiding competitive crises.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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