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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

JENNIFER MACDOUGALL, J. MICHAEL BRITTAIN and ROBERT GANN

This paper provides an overview of the range and development of health informatics, with examples from the literature world wide covering the types of information…

Abstract

This paper provides an overview of the range and development of health informatics, with examples from the literature world wide covering the types of information involved, the areas of application, the impact of evidence based medicine and other professional issues, integrated information systems, and the needs of the public, patients and their carers. While medical informatics certainly comprises a major part of health informatics it is not the main focus of this paper. Medical informatics is the older term and involves the use of information technology and computing specifically for medical science research, and the diagnosis and treatment of disease involving, for example, X‐rays, imaging, resonance, and magnetic scanning techniques. Rather, the scope of this review is the literature relating to the wider concept of the management of information through the interdisciplinary application of information science and technology for the benefit of patients, scientists, managers, staff, and carers involved in the whole range of healthcare activity.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 52 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Shaoyi He

Since the late 1970s, the term “informatics” has increasingly been adopted to describe the application of information technology to various fields, such as legal…

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2186

Abstract

Since the late 1970s, the term “informatics” has increasingly been adopted to describe the application of information technology to various fields, such as legal informatics, medical informatics, social informatics and organizational informatics. This article provides a brief survey of informatics with respect to its historical background, disciplinary identity, fundamental aspects, applications, and challenges.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Kisha Hortman Hawthorne and Lorraine Richards

This paper examines existing research on the topic of personal health records (PHRs). Areas covered include PHR/patient portal, recordkeeping, preservation planning…

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4601

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines existing research on the topic of personal health records (PHRs). Areas covered include PHR/patient portal, recordkeeping, preservation planning, access and provider needs for future reuse of health information. Patient and physician PHR use and functionality, as well as adoption facilitators and barriers, are also reviewed.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper engages in a review of relevant literature from a variety of subject domains, including personal information management, medical informatics, medical literature and archives and records management literature.

Findings

The review finds that PHRs are extensions of electronic records. In addition, it finds a lack of literature within archives and records management that may lead to a less preservation-centric examination of the new PHR technologies that are desirable for controlling the lifecycle of these important new records-type.

Originality/value

Although the issues presented by PHRs are issues that can best be solved with the use of techniques from records management, there is no current literature related to PHRs in the records management literature, and that offered in the medical informatics literature treats the stewardship aspects of PHRs as insurmountable. This paper offers an introduction to the aspects of PHRs that could fruitfully be examined in archives and records management.

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Peter Kokol, Kaija Saranto and Helena Blažun Vošner

The rapid development of eHealth requires the extension of existing health informatics competences sets. These competences are needed not only by health-care professionals…

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1171

Abstract

Purpose

The rapid development of eHealth requires the extension of existing health informatics competences sets. These competences are needed not only by health-care professionals but also by health-care consumers. The purpose of this paper is to analyse literature production of health informatics and eHealth competences/skills (EHCS).

Design/methodology/approach

Bibliometric analysis and mapping have been used as a form of distant reading approach in the manner to perform thematic analysis, identify gaps in knowledge and predict future trends.

Findings

This study shows that the literature production of health informatics and EHCS differs in bibliometric indicators, as well as in research content. Thematic analysis showed that medicine is the most productive subject area in both fields. However, health informatics competencies/skills are more oriented toward education, nursing, electronic health record and evidence-based practice, while EHCS cover health information technology, engineering, computer science and patient-centred care. The literature research production exhibits positive trend and is geographically widespread in both fields.

Research limitations/implications

The use of Scopus database might have led to different results if the authors had used Web of Science or Medline, because of the fact that different databases cover different lists of source titles. The authors used various search strings, and the most optimal one for their study; however, a different search string might result in slightly different outcomes. In addition, the thematic analysis has been performed on information source abstracts and titles only, as the analysis of full texts (if available) could lead to different results. Despite the fact that the thematic analysis has been performed by three researchers with different scientific backgrounds, the results of the analysis are subjective. On the other hand, the bibliometric analyses and comparison of health informatics and eHealth competences have never been done before and this study revealed some important gaps in research in both fields.

Practical implications

The World Health Organization defined four distinct but related components of eHealth: mobile health, health information systems, telemedicine and distance learning. While the research in telemedicine and health information systems seems to be well covered, the skills and competencies in mobile health and distant learning should be researched more extensively.

Social implications

More research in the skills and competencies associated with so-called connected health, a new subfield in eHealth research, is needed. The skills and competencies of how to better implement and use the services related to the management of chronic diseases, health coproduction and how to implement eHealth in developing countries are currently under research areas and with candidates for future research. For both health informatics competencies/skills and EHCS, we noted that more research is needed for personalised medicine, health coproduction, smart health, internet of things, internet of services and intelligent health systems.

Originality/value

The literature production on health informatics and EHCS has been analysed for the first time and been compared in a systemic way, using bibliometrics. The results reveal that current research directions as well as knowledge gaps could thus provide guidelines for further research.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 47 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2010

Mark E. Shelton

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168

Abstract

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Collection Building, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2010

Margot Lindsay

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194

Abstract

Details

Library Review, vol. 59 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2021

Man Xu, Dan Gan, Ting Pan and Xiaohan Sun

Qualitative methods are not suitable to process high volumes of policy texts for exploring policy evolution. Therefore, it is hard to use qualitative methods to…

Abstract

Purpose

Qualitative methods are not suitable to process high volumes of policy texts for exploring policy evolution. Therefore, it is hard to use qualitative methods to systematically analyze the characteristics of complex policy networks. So the authors propose a bibliometric research study for exploring policy evolution from time–agency–theme perspectives to excavate the rules and existing problems of China's medical informatization policy and to provide suggestions for formulating and improving the future medical informatization policies.

Design/methodology/approach

Initially, 615 valid samples are obtained by retrieving related China's medical informatization policy documents, and the joint policy-making agency network and the co-occurrence network models of medical informatization policies are defined, and then the authors research China's medical informatization policies from single-dimension and multi-dimension view.

Findings

The analysis results reveal that China's medical informatization policy process can be divided into four stages; the policy-making agencies are divided into four subgroups by community detection analysis according to the fast unfolding algorithm; the core policy theme keywords are identified based on the eigenvector centrality of the nodes in those networks; the focuses of theme terms are varied in different stages and the correlations between agencies and themes are gradually decentralized.

Practical implications

These findings provide experience and evidence on leveraging informatics in the medical and healthcare field of China. Also, they can help scholars and practitioners better understand the current status and future directions of medical and healthcare informatics development in China and provide a reference to formulate and improve China's future medical informatization policies.

Originality/value

This study proposes a quantitative bibliometric-based research framework to describe transitions and trends of China's medical informatization policy.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 73 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2007

Anna Marie Johnson and Sarah Jent

The purpose of this paper is to set out to provide a selected bibliography or recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

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4605

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to set out to provide a selected bibliography or recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

Design/methodology/approach

Introduces and annotates periodical articles, monographs, and exhibition catalogues examining library instruction and information literacy.

Findings

Provides information about each source, discusses the characteristics of current scholarship, and describes sources that contain unique scholarly contributions and quality reproductions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Helen‐Ann Brown

Clinical medical librarians stepped out of the library and joined the patient care team in the early 1970s, beginning in Kansas City, Missouri and then Hartford…

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2377

Abstract

Clinical medical librarians stepped out of the library and joined the patient care team in the early 1970s, beginning in Kansas City, Missouri and then Hartford, Connecticut. Now they are present to report the literature, take literature search requests and, most importantly, perceive information needs at Morning Report, bedside rounds, or weekly conferences. Within 24 hours or less, they return to the patient care team with literature to aid in patient planning. Clinical medical librarians also teach online searching in an evidence‐based way and help patient care team members with other research needs. In 2000, the concept of the informationist was introduced. It can begin with clinical medical librarianship and expand to this information specialist in context, being based and salaried in a clinical setting, having information‐seeking skills, knowledge of informatics and the clinical subject area. Both the clinical medical librarian and the clinical informationist contribute to better patient care, medical education and clinical research.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2009

Stephen M. Mutula

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250

Abstract

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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