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Book part
Publication date: 15 September 2016

Elaine Y.T. Chew and Stephanie Onggo

The aim of this chapter is to understand the nature of business collaboration between healthcare service providers and tourism agencies in Malaysia. Interviews with 17…

Abstract

The aim of this chapter is to understand the nature of business collaboration between healthcare service providers and tourism agencies in Malaysia. Interviews with 17 healthcare service providers in Malaysia reveal that most of the collaboration between healthcare service providers and tourism agencies in Malaysia is informal or loose, despite their intention to leverage on medical tourism for business expansion. Close and tight collaborations are rare. The findings point towards the main reasons behind the rare collaboration which are the high customer orientation of healthcare service providers, the strategic move of business and support for government agenda.

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Tourism and Hospitality Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-714-4

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Article
Publication date: 27 October 2021

Daniel Michaeli, Gregory Keough, Quirin Strotzer and Thomas Michaeli

Medical education was challenged and re-imagined during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study aims to examine the consequent changes in medical school curricula alongside…

Abstract

Purpose

Medical education was challenged and re-imagined during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study aims to examine the consequent changes in medical school curricula alongside students’ mental and physical health.

Design/methodology/approach

It is observed that 549 medical students (response rate: 79.7%) from 31 of 37 public medical schools in Germany completed a cross-sectional online survey. Students answered questions regarding teaching, internet use, COVID-19 and well-being. A multivariate logistic regression examined factors associated with depressed mood, insomnia and headache.

Findings

Academic teaching moved to a virtual environment (91%), whilst practical activities were suspended or cancelled (88%). Virtual teaching modality, quantity and quality were well-perceived, yet 35% of respondents were dissatisfied with their internet connection. Consequently, students worried about the pandemic’s adverse effect on their quality as a doctor (60%) and thought about postponing their studies (30%). Students were frequently engaged in the treatment of COVID-19 patients (36%). Daily screen time was significantly associated with depressed mood, insomnia and headache. Negative changes in mental and physical health were frequently observed.

Research limitations/implications

Students’ experience with digital education during the COVID-19 pandemic was mixed. Whilst teaching modality, quantity and quality were well-perceived, students’ mental and physical health deteriorated. Further longitudinal studies investigating the impact of digital education on students’ well-being are necessary.

Practical implications

Besides teaching, faculties must quickly digitalize and strengthen social communities and offer targeted support services for students.

Originality/value

This is the first cross-sectional survey exploring medical students’ experience with virtual medical teaching alongside their mental and physical well-being in Germany.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2021

Florian Gebreiter

This paper examines the historical background of accountingization, colonization and hybridization in the health services by exploring the relationship between hospital…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the historical background of accountingization, colonization and hybridization in the health services by exploring the relationship between hospital accounting and clinical medicine in Britain between the late 1960s and the early 2000s.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on an analysis of professional journals, government reports and other documentary sources relating to accounting and medical developments. It is informed by Abbott's sociology of professions and Eyal's sociology of expertise.

Findings

The paper shows that not only accountants but also elements within the medical profession sought to make the practice of medicine more visible, calculable and standardized, and that accounting and medical attempts to make medicine calculable interacted in a mutually reinforcing manner. Consequently, it argues that a movement towards clinical forms of quantification within the medical profession made it more open to economic calculation, which underpinned hospital accounting reforms and the accountingization, colonization or hybridization of health services.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates that a fuller understanding of the relationship between accounting and public sector professions can be developed if we examine their mutual interactions rather than restricting ourselves to analyzing accounting's effects on public sector professions. The paper moreover illustrates instances of intraprofessional conflict and inter-professional cooperation, and draws on the sociology of expertise to suggests that while hospital accounting reforms have curbed the power of medical professionals, they have also enhanced the power of clinical expertise.

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Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2021

Sumayah AlJhani, Deemah Alateeq, Afnan Alwabili and Ahmad Alamro

The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has multiple consequences, including social distancing and the shift of education from in-person to online learning, which may…

Abstract

Purpose

The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has multiple consequences, including social distancing and the shift of education from in-person to online learning, which may have a psychological impact on students, especially those in medical colleges. This study aims to explore the effect of online learning on medical students’ mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic across Saudi Arabia.

Design/methodology/approach

A descriptive, nationwide, cross-sectional survey was conducted during the COVID-19 pandemic, after students in medical colleges moved to online learning. It included socio-demographic characteristics, online learning-related questions, perceived stress scale and generalized anxiety disorder-7.

Findings

The participants represented various academic levels within the basic science phase (44.9%) and clinical phase (55.1%) and various regions, including the central (55.3%), western (18.8%), northern (13.4%), southern (8.8%) and eastern (3.7%) regions. Moderate to high perceived stress was reported by 94.4% of students. Two-thirds of the students reported generalized anxiety symptoms, ranging from moderate to severe in 47% of them. A significant positive correlation was found between stress and anxiety. Women, age > 25, first-year students, students facing oral and objective structured clinical examinations, students with excellent and pass grades and those facing difficulties had higher levels of stress and anxiety. In addition, being non-Saudi, married or having a history of psychiatric illness was associated with higher levels of anxiety.

Originality/value

Stress and anxiety were highly expressed among participants using online learning. In addition to studying the efficacy of online learning, it is important to focus on its effect on medical students’ mental health, due to the highly competitive and demanding environment of medical colleges.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2021

Maria Andri

This paper aims at understanding how clinical guidelines' use in the labour process relates to clinical autonomy, that is, the self-control medical professionals exercise…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims at understanding how clinical guidelines' use in the labour process relates to clinical autonomy, that is, the self-control medical professionals exercise over medical practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on a qualitative case study research strategy, this paper explores how medical professionals use clinical guidelines in the labour process in one public general hospital of the Greek National Health System. Supplemented by an extensive study of documents, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 33 doctors of several specialties.

Findings

The analysis shows (1) how clinical autonomy, as a self-control structure, mediates the use of clinical guidelines as a knowledge tool in the labour process, and (2) how employing clinical guidelines as a means towards coordinating medical work, but also towards regulating and standardising medical practice, is exercising pressure on the individualistic character of clinical autonomy.

Originality/value

Advancing the analytic value of workplace control structures, this paper contributes novel theoretical understanding of emerging tendencies characterising medical work organisation and clinical autonomy, and explains how medical professionals' non-adherence to clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) relates to CPGs' role as a resource to medical practice. Finally, this research proposes a more critical approach to health policy towards addressing the challenges associated with centrally introducing clinical guidelines in healthcare organisations.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2021

Katarzyna Dorota Hampel

The article’s primary goal is to identify areas requiring improvement in the activities of healthcare entities, suggest directions for future changes, and indicate the…

Abstract

Purpose

The article’s primary goal is to identify areas requiring improvement in the activities of healthcare entities, suggest directions for future changes, and indicate the strengths and weaknesses of the clinic’s operation based on patients’ opinions. Subjectively expressed opinions of patients are treated as acceptance of the current state of affairs or the need to introduce changes in a given area.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical research was based on information obtained from questionnaire surveys on patients’ opinions about services provided by medical entities. The hypothesis was verified by research conducted in 23 (out of 50 possible) the most dynamically developing non-public healthcare institutions in one of the regions of Poland. The conducted research was based on a proprietary survey using questions on qualitative and quantitative scales.

Findings

The results of empirical research allowed us to identify areas requiring improvement and to propose future directions of changes in the surveyed units. The suggested changes should significantly improve efficiency in the organisation and management of a health facility, focused on medical effectiveness and patients’ health effectiveness.

Originality/value

From a broader perspective, research results may become a starting point for further considerations on changes in the organisation and management of healthcare facilities. Using the study’s conclusions in practice may positively affect the improvement of the functioning of healthcare facilities, their better reputation and contribute to increasing competitiveness in the medical services market.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 34 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 16 April 2018

Gerard Lambe, Niall Linnane, Ian Callanan and Marcus W. Butler

Ireland’s physicians have a legal and an ethical duty to protect confidential patient information. Most healthcare records in Ireland remain paper based, so the purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Ireland’s physicians have a legal and an ethical duty to protect confidential patient information. Most healthcare records in Ireland remain paper based, so the purpose of this paper is to: assess the protection afforded to paper records; log highest risk records; note the variations that occurred during the working week; and observe the varying protection that occurred when staff, students and public members were present.

Design/methodology/approach

A customised audit tool was created using Sphinx software. Data were collected for three months. All wards included in the study were visited once during four discrete time periods across the working week. The medical records trolley’s location was noted and total unattended medical records, total unattended nursing records, total unattended patient lists and when nursing personnel, medical students, public and a ward secretary were visibly present were recorded.

Findings

During 84 occasions when the authors visited wards, unattended medical records were identified on 33 per cent of occasions, 49 per cent were found during weekend visiting hours and just 4 per cent were found during morning rounds. The unattended medical records belonged to patients admitted to a medical specialty in 73 per cent of cases and a surgical specialty in 27 per cent. Medical records were found unattended in the nurses’ station with much greater frequency when the ward secretary was off duty. Unattended nursing records were identified on 67 per cent of occasions the authors visited the ward and were most commonly found unattended in groups of six or more.

Practical implications

This study is a timely reminder that confidential patient information is at risk from inappropriate disclosure in the hospital. There are few context-specific standards for data protection to guide healthcare professionals, particularly paper records. Nursing records are left unattended with twice the frequency of medical records and are found unattended in greater numbers than medical records. Protection is strongest when ward secretaries are on duty. Over-reliance on vigilant ward secretaries could represent a threat to confidential patient information.

Originality/value

While other studies identified data protection as an issue, this study assesses how data security varies inside and outside conventional working hours. It provides a rationale and an impetus for specific changes across the whole working week. By identifying the on-duty ward secretary’s favourable effect on medical record security, it highlights the need for alternative arrangements when the ward secretary is off duty. Data were collected prospectively in real time, giving a more accurate healthcare record security snapshot in each data collection point.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Wen‐Chen Tsai, Pei‐Tseng Kung and Yi‐Ju Chiang

The purpose of this paper was to examine the relationship between medical malpractice claims and medical care quality in Taiwan. The Delphi technique with an expert panel…

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Abstract

The purpose of this paper was to examine the relationship between medical malpractice claims and medical care quality in Taiwan. The Delphi technique with an expert panel was used to determine the relationship between malpractice and medical quality. A total of 371 medical malpractice claims were analyzed. Main measures included the rate and strength of malpractice cases associated with quality and the identification of the quality factors influencing the occurrence of malpractice. Results showed that malpractice claims were associated with internal medicine cases, surgery cases, pediatric cases, obstetric and gynecological cases, physicians' professional competence, non‐acceptable outcomes, complications, and poor communication. Concludes that medical malpractice cases could be avoided by increasing physicians' professional knowledge, practical skills, and communication.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 17 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

Fred A. Curtis and Karen Mak

Because medical waste may present potential hazards to employees,waste handlers and the general public, all facilities generating thisform of waste should develop and…

Abstract

Because medical waste may present potential hazards to employees, waste handlers and the general public, all facilities generating this form of waste should develop and implement a medical waste management strategy. This strategy should be prepared after conducting a survey to determine the types and estimated amounts of medical waste generated by the facility. The strategy should address medical waste handling, including segregation, packaging, in‐house transport and storage. The management plan must also prescribe appropriate treatment procedures for contaminated waste, and designate proper methods for final disposal of medical wastes and treatment residues. Finally, the facility must ensure the implementation and monitoring of this strategy.

Details

Environmental Management and Health, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-6163

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2021

Jillian Cavanagh, Timothy Bartram, Patricia Pariona-Cabrera, Beni Halvorsen, Matthew Walker and Pauline Stanton

This study examines the management rostering systems that inform the ways medical scientists are allocated their work in the public healthcare sector in Australia…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the management rostering systems that inform the ways medical scientists are allocated their work in the public healthcare sector in Australia. Promoting the contributions of medical scientists should be a priority given the important roles they are performing in relation to COVID-19 and the demand for medical testing doubling their workloads (COVID-19 National Incident Room Surveillance Team, 2020). This study examines the impact of work on medical scientists and rostering in a context of uncertain work conditions, budget restraints and technological change that ultimately affect the quality of patient care. This study utilises the Job-Demands-Resources theoretical framework (JD-R) to examine the various job demands on medical scientists and the resources available to them.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a qualitative methodological approach, this study conducted 23 semi-structured interviews with managers and trade union officials and 9 focus groups with 53 medical scientists, making a total 76 participants from four large public hospitals.

Findings

Due to increasing demands for pathology services, this study demonstrates that a lack of job resources, staff shortages, poor rostering practices such as increased workloads that lead to absenteeism, often illegible handwritten changes to rosters and ineffectual management lead to detrimental consequences for medical scientists’ job stress and well-being. Moreover, medical science work is hidden and not fully understood and often not respected by other clinicians, hospital management or the public. These factors have contributed to medical scientists’ lack of control over their work and causes job stress and burnout. Despite this, medical scientists use their personal resources to buffer the effects of excessive workloads and deliver high quality of patient care.

Originality/value

Findings suggest that developing mechanisms to promote sustainable employment practices for medical scientists are critical for the escalating demands in pathology.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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