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Article
Publication date: 18 March 2020

Francisca Greene Gonzalez and María José Lecaros

This paper reviews the origins of the Ethics Council of the Federation of Social Communication Media of Chile (1991-2019) and looks into the historical circumstances…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper reviews the origins of the Ethics Council of the Federation of Social Communication Media of Chile (1991-2019) and looks into the historical circumstances surrounding its creation, the concept of self-regulation as understood by its founders, and the criteria that initially ruled its operation.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative survey of nine contemporary witnesses and the confrontation with the scientific literature.

Findings

The results reveal a significant coincidence with the academic literature both in the description of the concept of self-regulation and in the origin of the ethics councils and of the system under which they operate. However, a series of nuances not usually considered in the concept of self-regulation are described.

Originality/value

This study will help assess the national and international possibilities of self-regulation and the significance of the Chilean ethics council.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Tracy Tsui-Hsu Tsai, Arthur Jing Lin and Eldon Y. Li

This study aims to investigate whether engagement in philanthropic marketing after the 311 Japan earthquake crises had a positive effect on brand resonance and consumer…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate whether engagement in philanthropic marketing after the 311 Japan earthquake crises had a positive effect on brand resonance and consumer satisfaction of CSR performance for Taiwanese companies. Additionally, the particular phenomenon of media self-regulation was integrated to explore the consolidated impact of philanthropic marketing, media self-regulation and brand resonance on consumer satisfaction of CSR performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used survey method to collect required data. The subjects of the study were 516 adults who were aware of the 311 Japan earthquake crises. Of the 476 survey questionnaires collected, 450 were identified as usable.

Findings

The results show that the constructs were highly positively correlated, meaning that post-disaster corporate philanthropic marketing can enhance brand resonance and consumer satisfaction of CSR performance. Media self-regulation was found to have a significant influence on philanthropic marketing and brand resonance. However, it did not exert any significant effect on consumer satisfaction of CSR performance.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the chosen research method and surveyed subjects, the research results may lack generalizability. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to test the proposed research model further with additional subjects and variables.

Practical implications

A good impression of the brand usually makes consumers generate brand resonance. This study reveals that a higher level of brand resonance may lead to higher consumer satisfaction of CSR performance. This implies that local and international companies should engage in philanthropic marketing programs, as it will not only support charitable organizations but also enhance the firm’s corporate image.

Social implications

This study points out that the positive coverage of the disaster could give the audience a positive impression, rather than showing provocative, violent or sexual content to push viewership. At the time when disasters become increasingly common, people’s expectations of the media will also elevate. Dramatization, exaggeration and information overload make the audience distrust the media and constantly seek the truth behind the story. Content generated by online bloggers and citizen reporters (ordinary people) is an alternative source for true, fast and in-depth reports.

Originality/value

This study differs from earlier studies researching disastrous events in that they were taking the perspective of natural sciences, while we adopted the management viewpoint to evaluate the 311 crises and took media self-regulation into account. It is the first to reveal that media’s self-regulated coverage of the disaster seems to have a positive effect on corporate philanthropic marketing and brand resonance.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Marcel Machill, Thomas Hart and Bettina Kaltenhäuser

Self‐regulation is widely considered to be a necessary complement – sometimes substitute – for traditional media‐supervision legislation and practice, especially so when…

Abstract

Self‐regulation is widely considered to be a necessary complement – sometimes substitute – for traditional media‐supervision legislation and practice, especially so when the regulatory object is the Internet, where national legislation meets global networks and content. An example of an internationally structured self‐regulation initiative is provided by the Internet Content Rating Association (ICRA). Its filter for blocking Internet content must be seen within the context of a more extensive bundle of measures based on the principle of self‐regulation. By choosing ICRA as a focal point, the authors set out to illustrate the new, user‐centered paradigm that could become the rule rather than exception for all kinds of media.

Details

info, vol. 4 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Article
Publication date: 20 May 2020

Marcel Mauri-Ríos, Silvia Marcos-García and Aitor Zuberogoitia-Espilla

Codes of ethics are important instruments in journalism, as they promote transparency and self-regulation of media, in addition to monitoring the quality of information…

Abstract

Purpose

Codes of ethics are important instruments in journalism, as they promote transparency and self-regulation of media, in addition to monitoring the quality of information. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the perceptions that Spanish journalists have of the effectiveness of codes of ethics and to evaluate the different personal and professional variables which condition this vision.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used in the present study is based on quantitative content analysis using the survey technique. This technique makes it possible to obtain empirical data on various key aspects of the profession that are determining factors in ascertaining Spanish journalists’ views of one of the instruments of accountability that is external to the media: general ethical codes.

Findings

The results show that Spanish journalists are largely confident in the effectiveness of ethical codes in their profession. Likewise, it was seen that variables such as age, professional experience or the media with which they work influence the perceptions that professionals have of such instruments.

Originality/value

If understanding journalism as a profession whose mission is to guarantee the citizens their right to information, then it is essential to be familiar with the tools provided by the profession itself to be accountable to the public regarding this professional mission. Hence the importance of instruments of accountability and the perceptions of the professionals themselves regarding their effectiveness.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Eldon Y. Li

This aim of this article is to review the 12 manuscripts accepted into the special issue of “Corporate Politics, Philanthropy and Governance” in Chinese Management…

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913

Abstract

Purpose

This aim of this article is to review the 12 manuscripts accepted into the special issue of “Corporate Politics, Philanthropy and Governance” in Chinese Management Studies. It explains basic concepts, provides brief introduction to each manuscript and presents the related findings.

Design/methodology/approach

Most manuscripts in this special issue used primary empirical data (collected from field surveys or interviews) or secondary historical data (extracted from published literature, corporate reports or financial databases) for analyses. Both qualitative (case studies, comparative reviews) and quantitative (logistic regression, multiple regression, simultaneous equations) methods were used to draw conclusions.

Findings

The results of the studies in this special issue show: Singapore, rather Hong Kong, is a better governance model for China in reforming her society to be corruption free; corporate governance structure affects a firm’s performance and foreign direct investment decision; corporate governance can affect auditor selection only in low and medium agency conflict conditions; trustworthy characteristic of benevolence can mitigate the damages of perceived politics on affective commitment; the firms who selected to expense their research and development expenditures have lower stock price and return; organizational citizenship behavior can mediate the relationship between psychological contract and organizational performance; both relational and formal governance mechanisms can facilitate knowledge transfer in the alliance; companies with political connections are more likely to enter into industries with high entry barriers; circular-economy accounting information disclosure quality has low correlation with the profitability and the location of the listed companies; media self-regulation has a significant influence on philanthropic marketing and brand resonance.

Originality/value

The manuscripts in this special issue cover a wide range of topics, including corporate governance, corruption, politics, philanthropy, agency conflict, organizational citizenship behavior, media self-regulation and firm performance. The findings from the studies provide leaders of corporate governance with valuable insights, allowing them to adjust governance mechanisms properly to heighten governance quality and improve firm performance.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Stephen D. McDowell and Philip E. Steinberg

Explores a number of the debates and justification used to support and advance non‐state governance of the Internet in the USA. Reviews public reports released leading up…

Abstract

Explores a number of the debates and justification used to support and advance non‐state governance of the Internet in the USA. Reviews public reports released leading up to the formation of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN). Concludes that the scope herein is restricted to the jurisdictions and reasoning stated in the policy papers leading to the formation of the ICANN.

Details

info, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2019

Qian Liu, Zhen Shao, Jian Tang and Weiguo Fan

Drawing upon the theory of planned behavior (TPB) and the self-regulation framework, the purpose of this paper is to investigate whether and how factors for social media

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing upon the theory of planned behavior (TPB) and the self-regulation framework, the purpose of this paper is to investigate whether and how factors for social media continuance behaviors work differently between social networking sites and microblogging.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey method was used to collect two samples of 557 social networking sites users and 568 microblogging users. The proposed research model was tested with the structural equation modeling technique.

Findings

The empirical results demonstrate that the impacts of influencing factors on users’ continuance behaviors vary by types of social media services. Information sharing has a stronger impact on microblog users’ satisfaction than social network users while social interaction has a stronger impact on satisfaction for social network users than microblog users. In addition, interpersonal influence is more effective in shaping satisfaction for the social network users while media influence is more effective in shaping satisfaction for the microblog users.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies that integrate TPB with Bagozzi’s self-regulation framework to understand the behavioral model of social networking and microblogging continuance. The findings show that the impacts of attitudinal beliefs regarding information sharing and social interaction on social media users’ satisfaction are different across social networking and microblogging contexts. Moreover, this study also reveals different effects of two specific subjective norms – interpersonal and media influence – on continued use of social networking and microblogging.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 119 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Nipa Saha

This paper aims to outline the historic development of advertising regulation that governs food advertising to children in Australia. Through reviewing primary and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to outline the historic development of advertising regulation that governs food advertising to children in Australia. Through reviewing primary and secondary literature, such as government reports and research, this paper examines the influence of various regulatory policies that limit children’s exposure to food and beverage marketing on practices across television (TV), branded websites and Facebook pages.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews studies performed by the food industry and public health researchers and reviews of the evidence by government and non-government agencies from the early 19th century until the present day. Also included are several other research studies that evaluate the effects of self-regulation on Australian TV food advertising.

Findings

The government, public health and the food industry have attempted to respond to the rapid changes within the advertising, marketing and media industries by developing and reviewing advertising codes. However, self-regulation is failing to protect Australian children from exposure to unhealthy food advertising.

Practical implications

The findings could aid the food and beverage industry, and the self-regulatory system, to promote comprehensive and achievable solutions to the growing obesity rates in Australia by introducing new standards that keep pace with expanded forms of marketing communication.

Originality/value

This study adds to the research on the history of regulation of food advertising to children in Australia by offering insights into the government, public health and food industry’s attempts to respond to the rapid changes within the advertising, marketing and media industries by developing and reviewing advertising codes.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

Gordon E. Miracle and Terence Nevett

Until the late 19th century, the controls on advertising in Britain and the US depended on complying with laws relating to defamation and on the ethical values of…

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1023

Abstract

Until the late 19th century, the controls on advertising in Britain and the US depended on complying with laws relating to defamation and on the ethical values of advertisers and media proprietors. During the 20th century, concerns about public safety from dangerous products or services, recognition of the need to safeguard people from misleading or untrue claims, and attempts to strike a balance in the interests of fair trading have led to movements for both self‐regulation, as well as some legal restrictions on marketing and advertising practices. Differences in British and American practices have arisen from the nature of the legal systems and the cultural mores of the respective societies.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Andrew G. Parsons and Christoph Schumacher

The purpose of this paper is to examine the regulation of advertising by considering market‐driven firms (those seeking to keep within the boundaries set by social and…

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3403

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the regulation of advertising by considering market‐driven firms (those seeking to keep within the boundaries set by social and industry norms) and market drivers (those seeking to stretch boundaries to gain a competitive advantage). Thought is also given to the costs of regulation and tolerance to the social purse, and the benefits gained by compliance and violation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors develop a conceptual argument for boundary stretching where market drivers are present in a marketplace dominated by market‐driven firms. The authors then apply a game theory model to examine the conditions, the firm responses, and Government responses. In doing so the authors investigate incentives for non‐compliant behavior in a self‐regulated market and show that a firm can achieve a market advantage by stretching advertising boundaries.

Findings

Results suggest that when government takes a “wait‐and‐see” approach of partial tolerance, then the market driver can become the focal point for the market‐driven, and a shift will take place in the regulatory boundary. If the government is the boundary shifter then social engineers are taking advantage of artificial boundaries they know will not be enforced, with implications for campaigns such as drink‐driving, smoking, and domestic violence. Also, the market driver will gain a competitive advantage by entering a market‐driven marketplace through boundary shifts, even after incurring an initial penalty.

Research limitations/implications

The research demonstrates a need for research into marketing regulation to consider firm types, violation types, and tolerance levels. The study contributes to our understanding of marketer activity with two implications; first the firm is shifting the boundaries and redefining the market focal point as themselves, rather than violating the boundaries and setting themselves outside the rules. Second, depending on the level of tolerance that government has with the regulation of advertising, there is a cost to both the social purse and to market‐driven firms associated with boundary shifters.

Practical implications

A market driver, looking for growth opportunities, should try to enter markets dominated by market‐driven firms, and which have self‐regulation, while market driven firms should either look for regulatory protection or act collectively to wield power over third parties – for example forcing media outlets not to carry market driver advertising.

Originality/value

By introducing the concept of boundary stretching and allowing for market drivers and market driven firms, the authors show the effects of regulation (or tolerance) in a realistic setting and allow for the real‐world dynamics of a marketplace where new ideas create new focal points for social acceptance. This study also provides a clear illustration of the usefulness of game theory in marketing studies.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 46 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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