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Book part
Publication date: 27 August 2014

Thomas Mejtoft

For several hundreds of years printing has been the only effective channel for spreading mass communication. During the 1900s several new media channels have been invented…

Abstract

For several hundreds of years printing has been the only effective channel for spreading mass communication. During the 1900s several new media channels have been invented and, with the addition of the Internet, this has both changed the way media is consumed and has increased the competition between different channels. This qualitative case study of 37 firms reports on how relationships are used in the printing industry to relieve some of the impact of the competitive forces from new, and easily accessible, media as a means for marketing and, furthermore, on the impact on the printing industry as an industry. The results from the case study show that there are both internal and external effects of forming relationships and those vertical, as well as horizontal, relationships are of great importance to create a sustainable competitive situation for the printing industry. Relationships are used to increase both the strategic flexibility of the firm and the flexibility of the print media channel. Furthermore, the study illustrates that the printing industry, and print as a medium of communication, is drifting gradually away from the actual customer due to the new paradigm of value creation.

Details

Field Guide to Case Study Research in Business-to-business Marketing and Purchasing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-080-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

K. Ducatel, J.‐C. Burgelman and M. Bogdanowicz

Reports on a scenario exercise regarding the impact of digitisation on European media content industries, focusing on employment trends and changing skills. Concludes that…

Abstract

Reports on a scenario exercise regarding the impact of digitisation on European media content industries, focusing on employment trends and changing skills. Concludes that the Internet will profoundly restructure but not destroy, existing industries. Highlights the needs for multidisciplinary and multimedia training programmes for the new digital age.

Details

info, vol. 2 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Article
Publication date: 6 December 2018

Emma Tonkin, Annabelle M. Wilson, John Coveney, Julie Henderson, Samantha B. Meyer, Mary Brigid McCarthy, Seamus O’Reilly, Michael Calnan, Aileen McGloin, Edel Kelly and Paul Ward

The purpose of this paper is to compare the perspectives of actors who contribute to trust in the food system in four high income countries which have diverse food…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the perspectives of actors who contribute to trust in the food system in four high income countries which have diverse food incident histories: Australia, New Zealand (NZ), the United Kingdom (UK) and the Island of Ireland (IOI), focussing on their communication with the public, and their approach to food system interrelationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected in two separate studies: the first in Australia, NZ and the UK (Study 1); and the second on the IOI (Study 2). In-depth interviews were conducted with media, food industry and food regulatory actors across the four regions (n=105, Study 1; n=50, Study 2). Analysis focussed on identifying similarities and differences in the perspectives of actors from the four regions regarding the key themes of communication with the public, and relationships between media, industry and regulators.

Findings

While there were many similarities in the way food system actors from the four regions discussed (re)building trust in the context of a food incident, their perceptions differed in a number of critical ways regarding food system actor use of social media, and the attitudes and approaches towards relationships between food system actors.

Originality/value

This paper outlines opportunities for the regions studied to learn from each other when looking for practical strategies to maximise consumer trust in the food system, particularly relating to the use of social media and attitudes towards role definition in industry–regulator relationships.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 4 April 2019

Indrek Ibrus and Ulrike Rohn

The chapter discusses the characteristics of audiovisual (AV) media sectors in the Baltic Sea region. Therein it focuses on the specifics of media industries in small…

Abstract

The chapter discusses the characteristics of audiovisual (AV) media sectors in the Baltic Sea region. Therein it focuses on the specifics of media industries in small countries in the region as they are challenged in ways notably different from large countries with large domestic markets for media content. It discusses the differences between the AV media industries in the Nordic and Baltic countries and suggests that while in the first case long-term welfare society policies and conscious policy-driven system building have conditioned growth and international success then also in the second case innovation policy rationales have facilitated recent growth and dynamics. It then discusses the specific challenges, especially platformisation to small media industries in contemporary globalising media markets, and suggests that opportunities to resist these challenges may be in local inter-sectoral cooperation, that is, in building cross-innovation systems.

Details

Emergence of Cross-innovation Systems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-980-9

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2021

Kulvinder Kaur and Pawan Kumar

The rise in the use of Internet technologies and social media has shifted the marketing practices from offline to online. This study aims to determine the pros and cons of…

1021

Abstract

Purpose

The rise in the use of Internet technologies and social media has shifted the marketing practices from offline to online. This study aims to determine the pros and cons of social media marketing in the beauty and wellness industry.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth interviews were conducted with the owners and marketing executives of beauty and wellness centers to understand the use of popular social media platforms in this industry and their pros and cons.

Findings

The researchers identified eight merits and seven demerits of social media in the beauty and wellness industry. Every respondent is happy and satisfied with social media use, particularly Instagram and Facebook. Irrespective of the demerits, they have shown the intention to increase its usage in the future. The merits override demerits; thus, social media is a blessing for this industry from the owners' perspective.

Research limitations/implications

The research is exploratory and is confined to just one industry. Research implication is that the visual nature of social media makes it a powerful tool for the promotion of the beauty and wellness industry.

Practical implications

The study's findings will be beneficial for small-scale businesses as it will push them to take advantage of this low-cost marketing tool.

Social implications

Social media marketing is helpful for communication and marketing purposes for society.

Originality/value

The beauty and wellness industry remained unfocused by researchers because it is highly unorganized, fragmented and not regulated, yet has huge growth potential. This research will provide a closer look at this industry as well as social media marketing.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Book part
Publication date: 19 September 2022

Bhekinkosi Jakobe Ncube

This chapter interrogates the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on print newspaper industry in Zimbabwe. COVID-19 affected the global economy due to various…

Abstract

This chapter interrogates the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on print newspaper industry in Zimbabwe. COVID-19 affected the global economy due to various lockdowns and travel restrictions imposed by governments in attempt to stop the spread of the virus. This severely affected media houses, especially newspaper companies that depended on sales as their potential customers stayed home. The pandemic came against the backdrop of constant changes affecting the print media industry. Digitalisation and the resultant fragmentation of the audiences affect the way audiences consume media products. Against this milieu, this chapter investigates how these changes affected or shielded media houses from the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Two leading newspaper companies in Zimbabwe, Alpha Media Holdings and Zimbabwe Newspapers Group (1980) Ltd are used as case studies. The chapter deploys both the critical tradition to the study of media economics (political economy of the media) and the theory of the firm to argue that the traditional economic model of depending on casual sales for survival is outdated. The chapter documents the adverse effects of the pandemic on journalism practice highlighting how the impact was more pronounced in the privately owned newspaper companies than in government-controlled ones.

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COVID-19 and the Media in Sub-Saharan Africa: Media Viability, Framing and Health Communication
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-272-3

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Book part
Publication date: 8 December 2021

Nipa Saha

This chapter explores the development of advertising regulations governing food advertising to children in Australia since the 1940s. By introducing the advertising and…

Abstract

This chapter explores the development of advertising regulations governing food advertising to children in Australia since the 1940s. By introducing the advertising and marketing self-regulatory system, the Australian Government is taking a neoliberal approach, advocating for the free market to initiate and sustain the country’s economic development, instead of greater government regulation. By examining the primary and secondary literature, such as government reports and research, and newspaper and academic articles, this chapter outlines different regulatory initiatives adopted by both the government and food industry to limit food and beverage advertising to children on television and online, in order to prevent obesity rates increasing in children. This chapter synthesizes and critically evaluates food industry and public health studies, government and non-government reviews, and other research studies to evaluate the influence of self-regulation on Australian television food advertising within the neoliberal context since the 1990s. It contributes to the literature on food advertising regulations for children in Australia by offering evidence of how the government, public health authorities and the food industry have attempted to keep pace with changes in the advertising, marketing and media industries by developing and reviewing advertising codes. It identifies the loopholes that exist in these self-regulatory codes and concludes that Australia’s current advertising regulatory arrangements are failing to protect our children from unhealthy food marketing on television, especially on relatively under-regulated online platforms such as social media and branded websites. The issues identified in this chapter could aid the food and beverage industry, as well as the self-regulatory system, to offer comprehensive and applicable solutions to combat Australia’s obesity crises by implementing new legislations that align with different marketing practices.

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Media, Development and Democracy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-492-9

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Book part
Publication date: 20 December 2005

Andrew W. Martin

Despite an increase in research that examines the media's selection of protest events for coverage, two areas of study have been left undeveloped. First, the type of…

Abstract

Despite an increase in research that examines the media's selection of protest events for coverage, two areas of study have been left undeveloped. First, the type of protest examined is limited to common forms of the demonstration (march, vigil, rally). A second drawback of this literature is its focus on mass audience newspapers. The goal of the current study is to address these two issues by comparing coverage of a previously ignored form of protest, the strike, across two different media sources, the mass audience New York Times and the Daily Labor Report, a newspaper which targets industry and labor leaders and garners its revenue from subscriptions, not advertising. Due to specific differences between the two newspapers (primarily readership and revenue base), it is expected that certain strike characteristics (industry) will play a greater role in the New York Times’ selection of strikes than in the Daily Labor Report. Using government data to construct the population of events, I find that both newspapers select strikes in a manner that resembles coverage of other forms of protest. Important variables include size, length, and disruptiveness. The main difference between the two newspapers is the New York Time's attention to strikes in industries that affect the public and consumers and its strong regional bias. These findings indicate that not only do similar media selection processes work for both protest and strikes, but also that, despite some differences, media type did not affect selection greatly.

Details

Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-263-4

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 4 April 2019

Indrek Ibrus

This chapter presents the many premises of this book. It first discusses the book’s central questions and lays out the design of the large multi-national and multi-method…

Abstract

This chapter presents the many premises of this book. It first discusses the book’s central questions and lays out the design of the large multi-national and multi-method study, carried out across Northern Europe. It also places the book at the interdisciplinary space between contemporary innovation economics and cultural and social theory. It then discusses the complex set of social processes that have conditioned the phenomena that the book studies – how and why are the contemporary audiovisual media industries co-innovating and converging with other sectors including education, tourism and health care? Within this framework, it discusses the effects of the broader individualisation and mediatisation processes, of media convergence, of the emergence of cross-media or transmedia strategies, of the evolution of the service and experience economies and of the emergence of creative industries policy frameworks.

Details

Emergence of Cross-innovation Systems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-980-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 June 2022

Shawna Porter and Trevor Hunter

The authors' work examines whether coercive forces in the general regulatory environment lead to similarity in social media policy across industries and if memetic forces…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors' work examines whether coercive forces in the general regulatory environment lead to similarity in social media policy across industries and if memetic forces of industry-specific values and norms lead to greater similarity of social media policy within industries.

Design/methodology/approach

Corporate social media policies were analyzed using a convergent parallel mixed method design to assess and identify themes and similarities. Using an institutional theory lens, this paper examines whether coercive forces in the general regulatory environment lead to similarities in social media policies across industries, and if mimetic forces from industry-specific norms lead to greater similarity of social media policies within industries. Findings suggest that industry-specific, institutional field-level mimetic forces have a greater effect on social media policy isomorphism than environmental-level coercive forces. This study represents the first assessment of corporate social media policies across organizations and industries.

Findings

Findings suggest that industry-specific, institutional field-level mimetic forces have a greater effect on social media policy isomorphism than environmental-level coercive forces.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations related to sampling were primarily related to policy collection. To deal with these limitations, the sample was planned to allow for the inclusion of both randomly selected North American companies from the Fortune 500 list and another random selection of 35 companies from within a convenience sample of 100 North American firms who had a publicly available social media policy online.

Practical implications

The authors' research speaks to management, directors and researchers who work with policy, governance or risk management as the authors demonstrate the effect regulatory and normative institutions have on social media policies: stakeholders within and without given industries are forcing firms to develop legitimacy-providing social media policies by penalizing those that do not. The authors' findings demonstrate that firms respond to the 21st Century potential corporate risk of unsanctioned social media communications by developing corporate social media policies with similar themes. By identifying the themes common in corporate social media policies, the authors have identified best practices constituting a risk mitigation tool for boards.

Originality/value

The authors' approach is innovative in focus and approach. First, using an institutional theory lens, the authors assess the influence of regulatory and memetic forces on social media policies as a formal structure within an institutional field. Second, the authors' approach includes the first major assessment of North American social media policies across a wide array of organizations and industries, adding to understanding about approaches currently used to manage increased social media use in the workplace.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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1 – 10 of over 114000