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Article
Publication date: 15 April 2019

Mecit Can Emre Simsekler

Risk identification plays a key role identifying patient safety risks. As previous research on risk identification practices, as applied to patient safety, and its…

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Abstract

Purpose

Risk identification plays a key role identifying patient safety risks. As previous research on risk identification practices, as applied to patient safety, and its association with safety culture is limited, the purpose of this paper is to evaluate current practice to address gaps and potential room for improvement.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors carry out interview-based questionnaires in one UK hospital to investigate real-world risk identification practices with eight healthcare staff, including managers, nurses and a medical consultant. Considering various aspects from both risk identification and safety culture practices, the authors investigate how these two are interrelated.

Findings

The interview-based questionnaires were helpful for evaluating current risk identification practices. While gaining significant insights into risk identification practices, such as experiences using current tools and methods, mainly retrospective ones, results also explicitly showed its link with the safety culture and highlighted the limitation in measuring the relationship.

Originality/value

The interviews addressed valuable challenges affecting success in the risk identification process, including limitations in safety culture practice, training, balancing financial and safety concerns, and integrating risk information from different tools and methods.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2022

Abroon Qazi, Mecit Can Emre Simsekler and Steven Formaneck

This paper aims to assess the impact of different drivers of country risk, including business environment, corruption, economic, environmental, financial, health and…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess the impact of different drivers of country risk, including business environment, corruption, economic, environmental, financial, health and safety and political risks, on the country-level logistics performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilizes three datasets published by reputed international organizations, including the World Bank Group, AM Best and Global Risk Profile, to explore interactions among country risk drivers and the Logistics Performance Index (LPI) in a network setting. The LPI, published by the World Bank Group, is a composite measure of the country-level logistics performance. Using the three datasets, a Bayesian Belief Network (BBN) model is developed to investigate the relative importance of country risk drivers that influence logistics performance.

Findings

The results indicate a moderate to a strong correlation among individual risks and between individual risks and the LPI score. The financial risk significantly varies relative to the extreme states of the LPI score, whereas corruption risk and political risk are the most critical factors influencing the LPI score relative to their resilience and vulnerability potential, respectively.

Originality/value

This study has made two unique contributions to the literature on logistics performance assessment. First, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to establish associations between country risk drivers and country-level logistics performance in a probabilistic network setting. Second, a new BBN-based process has been proposed for logistics performance assessment and operationalized to help researchers and practitioners establish the relative importance of risk drivers influencing logistics performance. The key feature of the proposed process is adapting the BBN methodology to logistics performance assessment through the lens of risk analysis.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 11 February 2019

Mecit Can Emre Simsekler, Gulsum Kubra Kaya, James R. Ward and P. John Clarkson

There is a growing awareness on the use of systems approaches to improve patient safety and quality. While earlier studies evaluated the validity of such approaches to…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a growing awareness on the use of systems approaches to improve patient safety and quality. While earlier studies evaluated the validity of such approaches to identify and mitigate patient safety risks, so far only little attention has been given to their inputs, such as structured brainstorming and use of system mapping approaches (SMAs), to understand their impact in the risk identification process. To address this gap, the purpose of this paper is to evaluate the inputs of a well-known systems approach, failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), in identifying patient safety risks in a real healthcare setting.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was conducted in a newly established adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder service at Cambridge and Peterborough Foundation Trust in the UK. Three stakeholders of the chosen service together with the facilitators conducted an FMEA exercise along with a particular system diagram that was initially found as the most useful SMA by eight stakeholders of the service.

Findings

In this study, it was found that the formal structure of FMEA adds value to the risk identification process through comprehensive system coverage with the help of the system diagram. However, results also indicates that the structured brainstorming refrains FMEA participants from identifying and imagining new risks since they follow the process predefined in the given system diagram.

Originality/value

While this study shows the potential contribution of FMEA inputs, it also suggests that healthcare organisations should not depend solely on FMEA results when identifying patient safety risks; and therefore prioritising their safety concerns.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2021

Abroon Qazi and Mecit Can Emre Simsekler

This paper aims to develop a process for prioritizing project risks that integrates the decision-maker's risk attitude, uncertainty about risks both in terms of the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop a process for prioritizing project risks that integrates the decision-maker's risk attitude, uncertainty about risks both in terms of the associated probability and impact ratings, and correlations across risk assessments.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts a Monte Carlo Simulation-based approach to capture the uncertainty associated with project risks. Risks are prioritized based on their relative expected utility values. The proposed process is operationalized through a real application in the construction industry.

Findings

The proposed process helped in identifying low-probability, high-impact risks that were overlooked in the conventional risk matrix-based prioritization scheme. While considering the expected risk exposure of individual risks, none of the risks were located in the high-risk exposure zone; however, the proposed Monte Carlo Simulation-based approach revealed risks with a high probability of occurrence in the high-risk exposure zone. Using the expected utility-based approach alone in prioritizing risks may lead to ignoring few critical risks, which can only be captured through a rigorous simulation-based approach.

Originality/value

Monte Carlo Simulation has been used to aggregate the risk matrix-based data and disaggregate and map the resulting risk profiles with underlying distributions. The proposed process supported risk prioritization based on the decision-maker's risk attitude and identified low-probability, high-impact risks and high-probability, high-impact risks.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2021

Abroon Qazi and Mecit Can Emre Simsekler

The purpose of this paper is to develop and operationalize a process for prioritizing supply chain risks that is capable of capturing the value at risk (VaR), the maximum…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and operationalize a process for prioritizing supply chain risks that is capable of capturing the value at risk (VaR), the maximum loss expected at a given confidence level for a specified timeframe associated with risks within a network setting.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed “Worst Expected Best” method is theoretically grounded in the framework of Bayesian Belief Networks (BBNs), which is considered an effective technique for modeling interdependency across uncertain variables. An algorithm is developed to operationalize the proposed method, which is demonstrated using a simulation model.

Findings

Point estimate-based methods used for aggregating the network expected loss for a given supply chain risk network are unable to project the realistic risk exposure associated with a supply chain. The proposed method helps in establishing the expected network-wide loss for a given confidence level. The vulnerability and resilience-based risk prioritization schemes for the model considered in this paper have a very weak correlation.

Originality/value

This paper introduces a new “Worst Expected Best” method to the literature on supply chain risk management that helps in assessing the probabilistic network expected VaR for a given supply chain risk network. Further, new risk metrics are proposed to prioritize risks relative to a specific VaR that reflects the decision-maker's risk appetite.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2021

Kudret Demirli, Abdulqader Al Kaf, Mecit Can Emre Simsekler, Raja Jayaraman, Mumtaz Jamshed Khan and E. Murat Tuzcu

Increased demand and the pressure to reduce health-care costs have led to longer waiting time for patients to make appointments and during the day of hospital visits. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Increased demand and the pressure to reduce health-care costs have led to longer waiting time for patients to make appointments and during the day of hospital visits. The purpose of this study is to identify opportunities to reduce waiting time using lean techniques and discrete-event simulation (DES).

Design/methodology/approach

A five-step procedure is proposed to facilitate the effective utilization of lean and DES to improve the performance of the Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Outpatient Clinic at Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi. While lean techniques were applied to reduce the potential sources of waste by aligning processes, a DES model was developed to validate the proposed solutions and plan patient arrivals under dynamic conditions and different scenarios.

Findings

Aligning processes resulted in an efficient patient flow reducing both waiting times. DES played a complementary role in verifying lean solutions under dynamic conditions, helping to plan the patient arrivals and striking a balance between the waiting times. The proposed solutions offered flexibility to improve the clinic capacity from the current 176 patients up to 479 (without violating the 30 min waiting time policy) or to reduce the patient waiting time during the visit from the current 33 min to 4.5 min (without violating the capacity goal of 333 patients).

Research limitations/implications

Proposing and validating lean solutions require reliable data to be collected from the clinic and such a process could be laborious as data collection require patient and resource tracing without interfering with the regular functions of the clinic.

Practical implications

The work enables health-care managers to conveniently conduct a trade-off analysis and choose a suitable inter-arrival time – for every physician – that would satisfy their objectives between resource utilization (clinic capacity) and average patient waiting time.

Social implications

Successful implementation of lean requires a supportive and cooperative culture from all stakeholders involved.

Originality/value

This study presents an original and detailed application of lean techniques with DES to reduce patient waiting times. The adopted approach in this study could be generalized to other health-care settings with similar objectives.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

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