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Article

Firdaus Abdullah

This paper aims to test and compare the relative efficacy of three measuring instruments of service quality (namely Higher Education PERFormance (HEdPERF), SERVPERF and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to test and compare the relative efficacy of three measuring instruments of service quality (namely Higher Education PERFormance (HEdPERF), SERVPERF and the moderating scale of HEdPERF‐SERVPERF) within a higher education setting. The objective was to determine which instrument had the superior measuring capability in terms of unidimensionality, reliability, validity and explained variance.

Design/methodology/approach

After a pilot test, data were collected from students in two public universities, one private university and three private colleges in Malaysia between January and March 2004, by the “contact person” route. From a total of 560 questionnaires, 381 were usable: a response rate of 68.0 per cent. This sample of nearly 400,000 students in Malaysian tertiary institutions was in line with the generalized scientific guideline for sample size decisions. Data were subjected to regression analysis.

Findings

A modified five‐factor structure of HEdPERF is put forward as the most appropriate scale for the higher education sector.

Research limitations/implications

Since this study only examined the respective utilities of each instrument within a single industry, any suggestion that the HEdPERF is generally superior would still be premature. Nonetheless, the current findings do provide some important insights into how these instruments of service quality compare with one another.

Practical implications

The single dominant factor on this study is “access”, which has clear implications for institutions' marketing strategies.

Originality/value

This is believed to be the first study of its kind carried out among consumers of the higher education service.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article

James L. Price

Addresses the standardization of the measurements and the labels for concepts commonly used in the study of work organizations. As a reference handbook and research tool…

Abstract

Addresses the standardization of the measurements and the labels for concepts commonly used in the study of work organizations. As a reference handbook and research tool, seeks to improve measurement in the study of work organizations and to facilitate the teaching of introductory courses in this subject. Focuses solely on work organizations, that is, social systems in which members work for money. Defines measurement and distinguishes four levels: nominal, ordinal, interval and ratio. Selects specific measures on the basis of quality, diversity, simplicity and availability and evaluates each measure for its validity and reliability. Employs a set of 38 concepts ‐ ranging from “absenteeism” to “turnover” as the handbook’s frame of reference. Concludes by reviewing organizational measurement over the past 30 years and recommending future measurement reseach.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 18 no. 4/5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article

Ronald Stamper

It is unwise, though common practice, to base decisions on numerical values without knowing how they can be justified as correctly describing aspects of reality…

Abstract

It is unwise, though common practice, to base decisions on numerical values without knowing how they can be justified as correctly describing aspects of reality. Scientists have great responsibility in this regard, especially in the social sciences where it is easy to provide an appearance of rigour through the use of numbers and mathematical apparatus. We must be prepared to justify any numbers we use by clarifying the relationship between a numerical variable and a “real thing”. The article defines fundamental, explicit, scientific measurements and how they may be used in a meaningful way. It then considers instruments, in particular pointer measurements, that simulate these fundamental measurements. It concludes with a look at the validity of the resulting information.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 39 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article

César Camisón

This paper specifies how to construct and validate an instrument based on multi‐item scales for the cataloguing and measurement of managerial and organizational…

Abstract

This paper specifies how to construct and validate an instrument based on multi‐item scales for the cataloguing and measurement of managerial and organizational capabilities on the basis of management perceptions. The construction and reduction of the scales have been reinforced by the Delphi and retesting techniques. The use of this methodology was illustrated in a sample of Spanish industrial firms. The paper enhances the value of the instruments for a resource‐based view with regard to the faithful and rigorous measurement of its key concept, distinctive competences. The scales created provide consistent empirical evidence to remove doubts surrounding managerial self‐evaluation, including those arising from problems of self‐esteem and reinforcement effects. In addition, the paper provides empirical evidence to support the predictive ability of distinctive competences on current and long‐term performance variability.

Details

Management Research: Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

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Article

A. JOHN RENTOUL and BARRY J. FRASER

The School‐Level Environment Questionnaire (SLEQ) is a new instrument measuring teachers' perceptions of the following eight psychosocial dimensions of the environment of…

Abstract

The School‐Level Environment Questionnaire (SLEQ) is a new instrument measuring teachers' perceptions of the following eight psychosocial dimensions of the environment of primary or secondary schools: Affiliation, Student Supportiveness, Professional Interest, Achievement Orientation, Formalisation, Centralisation, Innovativeness and Resource Adequacy. Noteworthy features of the SLEQ are its consistence with the literature, coverage of Moos's three general categories for conceptualising all human environments, salience to practising teachers, specific relevance to schools, minimal overlap with classroom environment instruments, and economy. Administration of the SLEQ to two samples of 83 and 34 teachers, respectively, revealed that each seven‐item scale possessed satisfactory internal consistency and discriminant validity. Preliminary use of the SLEQ provided evidence of its usefulness in research into the effects of school‐level environment on classroom‐level environment and on teachers' pedagogical attitudes.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Book part

Phillip Gee, Timothy Ballard, Gillian Yeo and Andrew Neal

Affect is a dynamic construct that varies over time and can significantly influence motivation and performance in organisational contexts. This chapter addresses key…

Abstract

Affect is a dynamic construct that varies over time and can significantly influence motivation and performance in organisational contexts. This chapter addresses key conceptual and methodological challenges that arise when aiming to measure affect as a within-person process. The literature has been divided on whether the structure of affect is unipolar or bipolar and no research has considered this structure across levels of analysis. Measuring affect as a within-person process also requires a brief scale that can be administered with minimal disruption. This chapter presents data that provide evidence for bipolarity in the structure of affect. We use these data to validate the momentary affect scale, which is a new brief affect scale that can be used in within-person research designs and applied settings.

Details

Experiencing and Managing Emotions in the Workplace
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-676-8

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Article

Srabanti Mukherjee, Atanu Adhikari and Biplab Datta

The tourism literature has focused only on destination branding; nonetheless, measuring the quality of a destination from the tourism point of view has been overlooked…

Abstract

Purpose

The tourism literature has focused only on destination branding; nonetheless, measuring the quality of a destination from the tourism point of view has been overlooked, especially in the context of the emerging markets. This paper aims to focus on developing a scale measuring the overall quality of the tourist destinations.

Design/methodology/approach

With the help of extensive review of the literature, the study identified the key variables for measuring the quality of tourism destination in emerging markets. Thereafter, to determine the factor structure (purification stage) and assess the stability of the factor structure (validation stage), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) has been conducted. A second-order CFA has been conducted to analyse the factor structure stability of the broad dimensions, namely, the quality of service, the quality of destination features and the quality of experience.

Findings

This research shows that the quality of tourism can be determined not only by the quality of destination features but also by the quality of service and the quality of experience one perceives from a destination. Together, these three dimensions and their various sub-dimensions form a valid scale to measure the overall quality of a tourist destination.

Practical implications

This study provides marketing managers an idea of the dimensions that affect tourist destination quality. They can now align the dimensions measuring destination quality with the destinations that they are marketing to tourists. This can add to the competitive advantage of any place brand.

Originality/value

This study has developed three distinct measurement scales for quality of experience, quality of destination feature and quality of services and validated the same with adequate data following appropriate scale development procedure. Through empirical research, the authors have integrated these three dimensions as the constructs for measuring the overall quality of tourist destinations. Hence, as a pioneering attempt, the authors have developed a scale to measure the quality of tourist destinations.

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

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Article

Stefania Romenti, Chiara Valentini, Grazia Murtarelli and Katia Meggiorin

The purpose of this paper is to develop a measurement scale for assessing the quality of dialogic conversations among companies and digital publics in social media…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a measurement scale for assessing the quality of dialogic conversations among companies and digital publics in social media. Dialogic conversations are defined as sequences of communicative actions and counteractions taken by social actors for different purposes based on specific linguistic choices and characterised by diverse communicative approaches and the role played by the involved parties.

Design/methodology/approach

A multidimensional scale for measuring dialogic conversations is developed from relevant literature concerning dialogue and public engagement in the fields of corporate communication, public relations, management studies and conversation analysis. The scale is built on three main dimensions: organisation turn-taking, sequencing of conversation, repair strategies and procedures. A pilot study was conducted to purify it from irrelevant variables.

Findings

Results of the pilot study show a general good level of reliability for the majority of the proposed variables for Facebook but not for Twitter. This may indicate that Facebook is a more dialogical forum than Twitter.

Originality/value

This is the first study proposing a systematic measurement of the dialogue orientation of online conversations that takes into consideration the role of language and communicative actions. The proposed measurement offers corporate communication managers a concrete tool for evaluating the quality of their online communications and for identifying those areas of their online communication that need improvement.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

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Article

Dave Valliere

Entrepreneurial intent (EI) is a foundational construct in theories of entrepreneurship. But three challenges currently threaten the author’s ability to accurately measure

Abstract

Purpose

Entrepreneurial intent (EI) is a foundational construct in theories of entrepreneurship. But three challenges currently threaten the author’s ability to accurately measure EI. First, previous measurement approaches have confounded EI with closely related but theoretically distinct constructs such as attitudes and beliefs about entrepreneurship. Second, they have treated EI as an “all-or-nothing” decision, without reflecting the step-wise commitment of the entrepreneuring process. And finally, much of past EI research has been done in Western developed countries without validation in a diverse international context in which unstated assumptions about the EI construct may not hold. The purpose of this paper is to report on the development of a new EI scale that addresses these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Nested structural equation modelling is used to develop and validate a novel scale for measuring EI in international contexts, based on data from 998 respondents in eight countries.

Findings

A two-dimensional substructure to the EI construct is revealed as especially apparent in non-Western countries. Based on this, a new 11-item scale is proposed and validated.

Research limitations/implications

Previous studies utilizing the EI construct may be biased by its imprecise measurement and confounding by other constructs in the nomological net. The present study provides new insight into the nature of the EI construct and a novel instrument for measuring it without bias. The discovered two-dimensional structure for EI measurement may also have implications for theorists interested in antecedents and effects of EI.

Practical implications

Accurate measurement of EI is essential to developing and targeting policies to effect changes in national entrepreneurship. Previous measurements may therefore have contributed to misstatement of policy objectives and allocation of national resources.

Originality/value

This research provides a validated method of measuring EI without the serious confounds of previous scales, and that is robust to a wide range of international settings. It also provides new insight into a two-dimensional substructure to the EI construct that has not been observed in previous studies.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article

Peter J. Danaher and Vanessa Haddrell

Many different scales have been used to measure customer satisfaction. These scales can be divided into three main groups, being those measuring performance…

Abstract

Many different scales have been used to measure customer satisfaction. These scales can be divided into three main groups, being those measuring performance, disconfirmation and satisfaction. Reports on the design and execution of a study of hotel guests in which they were asked to rate the key service attributes of their stay using all three of these measurement scales. Repurchase intention and word‐of‐mouth effects were also measured. Compares the scales on the basis of reliability, convergent and discriminant validity, predictive validity, skewness, face validity and managerial value for directing a quality improvement programme. Shows the disconfirmation scale to be superior to both the performance and satisfaction scales on all these criteria except for predictive validity. In addition, the performance scale was generally better than the satisfaction scale on a number of these criteria.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

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