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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2022

Burhan Cinar, Derya Toksoz and A. Celil Cakici

Discussions of authenticity in touristic experiences indicate that it is a significant area in the search for meaning. This study aims to demonstrate that the quest for…

Abstract

Purpose

Discussions of authenticity in touristic experiences indicate that it is a significant area in the search for meaning. This study aims to demonstrate that the quest for authenticity in a tourist experience begins in the pre-travel period by associating it with meaning in life.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected via survey from 356 people planning to participate in tourism activities. The survey included demographic questions, the meaning in life scale and the quest for authenticity (QfA) scale, designed by previous researchers.

Findings

The analysis revealed that meaning in life levels significantly explained the quest for subjective authenticity (R2 = 0.303) and objective authenticity (R2 = 0.131) in tourist experiences. The search for objective authenticity in a tourist experience significantly mediated the relationship between meaning in life and subjective authenticity.

Research limitations/implications

The research has several limitations. Primarily, the sampling group of the research consists of Turkish tourists who are planning to participate in tourism mobilities, and mostly females volunteered to respond in the data collection process. Hence it is necessary to study potential tourists from other countries for a more generalized conclusion. Second, the authors did not specifically ask the sample group which forms of tourism they are planning to participate in, heritage and culture, fair, etc. Subsequent studies may address this distinction and the explanatory power of the independent variable may differ according to plan to participate in different forms of tourism.

Practical implications

Tourism has an important place in individuals' search for meaning in life and authenticity. Because it offers an environment/setting where individuals can find answers to these searches. As a result of modernism, individuals become alienated from themselves, and their environment and the meanings they attribute to life are sometimes blurred. Some individuals experiencing this tend towards tourist mobility. This process individuals go through also includes the need for authenticity. Thus, such tourist behaviors cause the emergence of different authentic products that can meet the expectations and wishes of individuals.

Social implications

One of the main elements that encourages people to travel is quest for authenticity, which they feel is lacking in modern life. Thus, tourists are more likely to experience meaning in life based on subjective experiences than viewed objects.

Originality/value

The study offers three novel findings: individuals seek authenticity in tourist experiences in order to find meaning in life; quest for authenticity begins in the pre-travel process; and objective authenticity is necessary to seek subjective authenticity through meaning in life. While a few studies have investigated these variables, the authenticity literature has neglected the pre-travel phase. However, this needs attention to better understand authenticity in tourism.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 May 2022

Austin Lee Nichols, Kristine Klussman and Julia Langer

The benefits of meaning in the workplace are abundant. However, few opportunities exist to increase meaning among employees in ways that result in desired organizational…

Abstract

Purpose

The benefits of meaning in the workplace are abundant. However, few opportunities exist to increase meaning among employees in ways that result in desired organizational impacts. The current study developed two new mindfulness-based interventions designed to ultimately increase both job and life satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Over five days, 67 participants either: (1) Reported their daily activities, (2) Additionally rated the meaningfulness of each hour, or (3) Additionally planned to increase the meaning of the least meaningful activities. At the beginning and end of the week, they also reported their job satisfaction and life satisfaction.

Findings

Results suggested that listing daily activities and rating the meaningfulness of each hour was most beneficial. Compared to only listing daily activities, this group experienced greater job and life satisfaction. In contrast, the group that additionally attempted to increase the meaningfulness of their daily activities did not perform better on either of these measures.

Practical implications

Spending only a few minutes focusing on recognizing the meaning in one's daily activities can improve one's job and life satisfaction. As such, organizations may consider encouraging engagement in such a task either at the end of the workday or at home. Doing so may result in an increase in both how satisfied they are at home and at work.

Originality/value

This provides initial evidence for a short intervention that may greatly increase the well-being of employees at work and home.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 March 2021

Babar Dharani, Margaux Giannaros and Kurt April

Employee boredom is of concern to organizations because of its impact on employees’ quality of work life and productivity. This study aims to test the regulation of…

Abstract

Purpose

Employee boredom is of concern to organizations because of its impact on employees’ quality of work life and productivity. This study aims to test the regulation of workplace boredom through meaning in life by workplace heroes to contribute to theory by examining the relationships between the variables and to practice by uncovering the potential of workplace heroes in alleviating state boredom.

Design/methodology/approach

Using online surveys and structured interviews for a mixed-method study, data were collected for state boredom, meaning in life and hero affirmation at work for a quantitative study, and data from the open-ended questions provided further insights regarding hero affirmation at work for a qualitative study.

Findings

Spearman rank-order correlations concluded correlations between state boredom and meaning in life. However, unlike personal heroes that influence meaning in life, workplace heroes were found not to. The qualitative analysis revealed three prime differences between workplace and personal heroes: proximity, symbolic representation of ideologies and qualities admired in the heroes. These reasons entailed that state boredom was not regulated by workplace heroes.

Originality/value

The model of Coughlan et al. (2019) explored trait boredom regulation through meaning in life by personal heroes. This study tested for the regulation of state boredom through meaning in life by workplace heroes; thus, contributing to theory through a nuanced model with enhanced usefulness in practice. The study also further dissects the concept of heroes by uncovering differences between workplace and personal heroes that perpetrated the differences in the findings.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 44 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

J.J. de Klerk

The role of spirituality in the organization is a rapidly growing area of interest in management literature and conferences. This resulted in a call for more scientific…

1882

Abstract

The role of spirituality in the organization is a rapidly growing area of interest in management literature and conferences. This resulted in a call for more scientific inquiry into workplace spirituality. However, progress with empirical research on spirituality in organizations seems to be hampered by a lack of construct clarity. Whilst the construct of workplace spirituality is being clarified, spirituality can be approximated and operationalized through one of its major elements, meaning in life. Much knowledge and insights can be gained in the role and relationships of spirituality in organizations through this approach. One such postulated relationship with spirituality (meaning in life) is wellness. This postulation is based mainly on the results from research studies that consistently show relationships between meaning in life and psychological well‐being. As work is also an element of wellness, potential relationships between meaning in life and various aspects of work wellness are explored and conceptualized. This paper explores work‐wellness from a spiritual framework through the construct of meaning in life by focusing on the contribution that a person's sense of meaning in life can play to improve work‐wellness and wellness in general. A research agenda is developed of postulated relationships of meaning in life with various work wellness related constructs. Thirteen research propositions are proposed to provide direction for the empirical inquiry into workplace spirituality.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2012

Venkat R. Krishnan

Creating and maintaining sustainable businesses require an understanding of the role of leadership in enhancing personal outcomes of employees, and of the processes by…

5154

Abstract

Purpose

Creating and maintaining sustainable businesses require an understanding of the role of leadership in enhancing personal outcomes of employees, and of the processes by which they can be enhanced. The purpose of this paper is to report a study on analyzing how transformational leadership is related to followers’ meaning in life and subjective wellbeing, with psychological empowerment being a mediating variable.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 285 managers (69 females and 215 males) of a large manufacturing organization in western India. They responded to questions about their superior's transformational leadership and their own empowerment, meaning in life and wellbeing.

Findings

Empowerment mediated the relationship between transformational leadership and follower's meaning in life and wellbeing.

Research limitations/implications

Same‐source bias is a possible limitation of the study. Leader's self‐rating on transformational leadership could be taken, but it would not be as valid as the rating given by followers. Another limitation is the collection of all data at the same time.

Practical implications

The strong and positive relationship between empowerment and meaning in life sheds light on making followers see greater meaning in life. Attempts to enhance meaning in life should first focus on increasing self‐efficacy. If followers do not have faith in their own capability to do their job, it may not be possible for them to see meaning in life.

Originality/value

This study adds to the existing literature by clarifying the process by which transformational leaders enhance followers’ meaning in life and subjective wellbeing.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Rewriting Leadership with Narrative Intelligence: How Leaders Can Thrive in Complex, Confusing and Contradictory Times
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-776-4

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

George Schultze and Carol Miller

This article discusses the importance of existential meaning in career counseling, provides a case study of its application, and relates it to career development theory…

7256

Abstract

This article discusses the importance of existential meaning in career counseling, provides a case study of its application, and relates it to career development theory. Career development and counseling professionals will find existential analysis useful in their service to others. Using logotherapy, a counseling professional living in a pluralistic society can assist individuals with distinct worldviews in their search for meaning. Given our lives and careers, we can find meaning by creating something or doing some good, by experiencing something or someone, and by our attitude towards unavoidable suffering.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Rewriting Leadership with Narrative Intelligence: How Leaders Can Thrive in Complex, Confusing and Contradictory Times
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-776-4

Article
Publication date: 20 November 2018

Simon Andrew Moss, Gretchen Ennis, Kerstin Z. Zander, Timothy Bartram and Darren Hedley

To enhance their innovation and reputation, many organizations introduce programs that are intended to attract, retain and support diverse communities. Yet, these programs…

Abstract

Purpose

To enhance their innovation and reputation, many organizations introduce programs that are intended to attract, retain and support diverse communities. Yet, these programs are often unsuccessful, partly because explicit references to diversity tend to evoke defensive reactions in employees from the dominant culture. To circumvent this problem, the purpose of this paper is to explore the hypothesis that individuals tend to be more receptive to diversity whenever they experience meaning in life. Furthermore, four workplace characteristics – informational justice, a manageable workload, equality in status and a compelling vision of the future – should foster this meaning in life.

Design/methodology/approach

To assess these possibilities, 177 employees completed a survey that assessed workplace practices, meaning in life and openness to diversity.

Findings

The results showed that informational justice, a manageable workload and a compelling vision were positively associated with openness to other cultures, constituencies and perspectives, and these relationships were partly or wholly mediated by meaning in life.

Originality/value

These findings imply that leaders might be able to foster an openness to diversity, but without explicit references to this diversity, circumventing the likelihood of defensive reactions. Specifically, a program that simultaneously encourages transparent communication, diminishes workload and clarifies the vision or aspirations of the future may represent an inexpensive but powerful means to foster an openness to diversity.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 37 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 October 2009

Machteld van den Heuvel, Evangelia Demerouti, Bert H.J. Schreurs, Arnold B. Bakker and Wilmar B. Schaufeli

The purpose of this paper is first, to test the validity of a new scale measuring the construct of meaning‐making, defined as the ability to integrate challenging or…

3391

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is first, to test the validity of a new scale measuring the construct of meaning‐making, defined as the ability to integrate challenging or ambiguous situations into a framework of personal meaning using conscious, value‐based reflection. Second, to explore whether meaning‐making is distinct from other personal resources (self‐efficacy, optimism, mastery, meaning in life), and coping (positive reinterpretation, acceptance). Third, to explore whether meaning‐making facilitates work engagement, willingness to change, and performance during organizational change.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross‐sectional survey‐data were collected from 238 employees in a variety of both public and private organizations.

Findings

Confirmatory factor analyses showed that meaning‐making can be distinguished from other personal resources, coping and meaning in life. Regression analyses showed that meaning‐making is positively related to in‐role performance and willingness to change, but not to work engagement, thereby partly supporting the hypotheses.

Originality/value

The paper focuses on meaning‐making that has not yet been studied empirically in organizational change settings. It shows that the new construct of psychological meaning‐making is related to valuable employee outcomes including in‐role performance and willingness to change. Meaning‐making explains variance over and above other personal resources such as self‐efficacy, optimism, mastery, coping and meaning in life.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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