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Abstract

Study level/applicability

Undergraduate/Masters/MBA.

Case overview

Anamika Enterprise Limited (AEL) is an export-import company founded in 1988. Today, AEL primarily imports coal from India which it then sells to customers in Bangladesh. However, a recent ban on coal mining in the Indian state of Meghalaya has created a huge problem for AEL. It is now considering opening trade routes to China and Indonesia. For that, it will need to consider both the short- and long-term factors related to its decision. It will need to take into consideration the cultural, economic and social factors in all three countries and trade accordingly. Tariff barriers and transportation costs will be a problem for AEL in the short run but in the long run, that may be overcome because of the experience effect arising from international business. Information and communication technology is also expected to have a huge impact.

Expected learning outcomes

Students are expected to learn the challenges of running international business in the real world and ways to overcome these challenges.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 5: International Business.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 June 2021

Raisa Tasneem Zaman and Md.Fazla Mohiuddin

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how menstruation specific stigma and behavior impacts female employee performance in Bangladesh. Besides, it aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how menstruation specific stigma and behavior impacts female employee performance in Bangladesh. Besides, it aims to investigate if nonwork-related stress has any mediating role in the menstruation-related stigma–employee performance and menstruation-related behavior–employee performance relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model is developed and tested using structural equation modeling (SEM) using Analysis of Moment Structures (AMOS) 25. A total of 400 respondents participated in a self-administered survey, of which 375 questionnaires were retained after discarding questionnaires with incomplete responses.

Findings

Stigma and behavior related to menstruation were found to have a significant negative effect on female employee performance. Menstruation specific nonwork-related stress was found to partially mediate between menstruation-related stigma–employee performance and menstruation-related behavior–employee performance relationship.

Originality/value

This is the first study to link menstruation specific stigma and behavior and female employee performance using SEM in the context of the Bangladeshi women employees. It is also the first study to investigate the mediating role of nonwork-related stress in the menstruation specific stigma–employee performance and menstruation specific behavior–employee performance relationship in the context of Bangladeshi women employees.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Mahafuz Mannan, Md. Fazla Mohiuddin, Nusrat Chowdhury and Priodorshine Sarker

The purpose of this paper is to link customer satisfaction, switching intentions, perceived switching costs, and perceived alternative attractiveness in the context of the…

1689

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to link customer satisfaction, switching intentions, perceived switching costs, and perceived alternative attractiveness in the context of the Bangladeshi mobile telecommunications market (MTM). In addition, this study develops three key formative determinants of customer satisfaction: financial factor, technological factor, and customer service factor.

Design/methodology/approach

A model is developed and tested using PLS-SEM with a sample size of 442 respondents. The three key formative determinants of customer satisfaction were developed using a panel of five industry experts.

Findings

Financial, technological, and customer service factors were found to have significant positive effects on customer satisfaction. Customer satisfaction and perceived switching costs were found to have a significant direct effect on switching intentions, and perceived switching costs and perceived alternative attractiveness were found to have significant moderating effects on switching intentions through customer satisfaction. However, no significant direct effect of perceived alternative attractiveness on switching intentions was found.

Originality/value

This is the first study to link customer satisfaction, switching intentions, perceived switching costs, and perceived alternative attractiveness using structural equation modeling in the context of the Bangladeshi MTM. In addition, three key formative determinants of customer satisfaction are developed.

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