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Article
Publication date: 15 January 2020

Bakil DhaifAllah, Sofiah Md-Auzair, Ruhanita Maelah and Md Daud Ismail

This paper aims to investigate the effect of product complexity and communication quality on inter-organizational cost management (IOCM) and open book accounting (OBA…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the effect of product complexity and communication quality on inter-organizational cost management (IOCM) and open book accounting (OBA) practices in buyer–supplier relationships in Malaysian manufacturing firms.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was administrated to CFOs or accounting managers of Malaysian suppliers. Exploratory factor analysis and Structural Equation Modeling procedures were applied to test convergent and discriminant validity of the measurement model and examine the relationships among the latent constructs in the structural model.

Findings

The results suggest that IOCM and OBA scales show acceptable reliability and validity. The findings also report that both product complexity and communication quality have a positive effect on IOCM and OBA in buyer–supplier relationships. However, the results suggest that IOCM does not influence OBA practice.

Research limitations/implications

Although IOCM and OBA constructs exhibited satisfactory reliability and validity, future research is required to refine and further validate these constructs. The data were only collected from the supplier’s perspective. Thus, future research is invited to benefit from matched data from both suppliers and buyers to generate additional insights on IOCM and OBA.

Practical implications

This study may assist suppliers and buyers in relationships by suggesting that complex products require the adoption of IOCM and OBA practices to reduce information asymmetries and manage costs. Furthermore, emphasizing quality of communication may enhance the implementation of these practices.

Originality/value

Theoretically, this study contributes to the academic stream of management accounting and cost management as it enhances an understanding of contributions introduced in prior literature on IOCM and OBA. It uses a complementary approach of transaction cost theory (TCT) and social exchange theory (SET) to explain the research model. Methodologically, the study validated scales for measuring IOCM and OBA in a new environment.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2017

Mohd Helmi Ali, Kim Hua Tan and Md Daud Ismail

The purpose of this paper is to propose a food supply chain (SC) integrity framework in the context of halal food.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a food supply chain (SC) integrity framework in the context of halal food.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides a discussion on the development of food SC integrity framework using triangulation of interviews’ insights with literature.

Findings

Current industry practices such as standards have not been sufficient in embracing the concept of food SC integrity. As the food SC is complex, food SC integrity framework is proposed as a solution. This paper proposes food SC integrity framework for halal food. It consists of four dimensions, namely: raw material, production, service, and information integrity. In addition, key elements for each dimension are derived from the interviews’ insights.

Research limitations/implications

The framework provides the evidence that the safeguarding of halal food integrity does not rely solely on certification; but it requires an extensive effort beyond certification.

Practical implications

Safeguarding of food integrity should involve all stages and actors of the SC. Religious standards should incorporate SC integrity profiling through a controlling mechanism to promote higher food product integrity.

Originality/value

Food SC integrity framework is important to religious food as it plays a significant role to the population. This study contributes to a newly developed SC integrity framework in the context of halal food.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2016

Norafni @ Farlina binti Rahim

Islamic finance and Halal product sectors are thriving successfully. This chapter is a general review of the perception of Asian consumers on Islamic finance and Halal…

Abstract

Purpose

Islamic finance and Halal product sectors are thriving successfully. This chapter is a general review of the perception of Asian consumers on Islamic finance and Halal sectors in the global Halal economy.

Methodology/approach

The first section will briefly describe the Halal concept in both Islamic finance and Halal industries, and the growth of both sectors in Asian countries. The second part highlights the review of Asian consumers’ perception towards Islamic finance products and Halal products.

Findings

The review found that the consumers’ perception towards the Islamic finance products and Halal products is distinctive. This is due to the diversity of Asian countries in terms of geography, religion, culture, ethnic, school of thoughts (madzahib), income per capita and government’s involvement.

Originality/value

The third part of the chapter concentrates on planning towards Halal marketing, which involves the move and future challenges in different layers of industries to gear up and strengthen the Halal economy.

Details

Advances in Islamic Finance, Marketing, and Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-899-8

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Article
Publication date: 7 May 2019

Dalila Daud

Waqf has the quality of perpetuity so waqf properties cannot be sold, bought or given as a gift to others. Therefore, it is necessary to make sure that the property is…

Abstract

Purpose

Waqf has the quality of perpetuity so waqf properties cannot be sold, bought or given as a gift to others. Therefore, it is necessary to make sure that the property is fully used and properly managed by the Malaysian Islamic councils. To properly manage these properties, it is essential for the councils to have a proper reporting. Unfortunatley, this is not the case in the present situation for waqf. It was found that there is a lack of reporting on waqf matters. The purpose of this paper is to explore how the Islamic governance can contribute to the sufficient and adequate of waqf reporting.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper described what is being practised at present for waqf reporting. A series of Islamic governance literature was proposed in reinforcing waqf reporting.

Findings

This paper fulfils a gap in prior research by discussing several systems in Islamic governance to achieve transparency in waqf reporting. The findings of this paper may provide a significant contribution to any organisation that act as a trustee for waqf.

Practical implications

This paper provides an opportunity for further theoretical approach in defining and describing the role of governance in the reinforcement of waqf reporting. The paper has recommended several strategies towards better governance in Islamic council, and these suggestions can be offered to the councils for improvement.

Social implications

This research will be of interest to policy makers, especially Government and State Government. Given the current debate in Malaysia on the most appropriate forms of regulation for the Islamic sector, this study aims to provide valuable insights into the role of Islamic governance in the system of regulation.

Originality/value

This paper examined several governance system in Islamic governance to be applied in any Islamic organisation. This paper specifically deals governance issue that should be practised by present councils to prevent lack in waqf reporting. This system discusses the ways Islamic councils should perform since the system was originally implemented by a previous, distinguished caliph, Umar Al-Khattab.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2015

Muhammad Khalique, Nick Bontis, Jamal Abdul Nassir bin Shaari and Abu Hassan Md. Isa

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the links between intellectual capital sub-components and organizational performance in small and medium enterprises (SMEs…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the links between intellectual capital sub-components and organizational performance in small and medium enterprises (SMEs) operating in the electrical and electronics manufacturing sector in Pakistan.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through structured questionnaires from a sample of 247 respondents from Pakistani SMEs in Gujranwala and Gujarat. Several tests were used to examine the reliability and validity of the research instrument. Finally, multiple regression analysis was used to test the proposed research hypotheses.

Findings

The findings of this study demonstrate that the overall regression model of intellectual capital shows goodness of fit while one component of intellectual capital – namely human capital – appeared insignificant. Subsequently, six out of seven research hypotheses was accepted.

Practical implications

This study will provide a valuable framework for entrepreneurs, executives, managers and policy makers in managing intellectual capital within the Pakistani context.

Originality/value

To the best knowledge of the authors, this is the first empirical study that has been conducted on SMEs operating in the electrical and electronics manufacturing sector in Pakistan.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 17 July 2014

Roshima Said, Mazlifa Md. Daud, Leily Adja Radjeman and Noridah Ismail

The number of Shari’ah Compliant companies is tremendously increasing year by year in Malaysia. In an attempt to win the trust and confidence of its Muslim investors and…

Abstract

Purpose

The number of Shari’ah Compliant companies is tremendously increasing year by year in Malaysia. In an attempt to win the trust and confidence of its Muslim investors and stakeholders, the Shari’ah Compliant companies must portray their sincerity and earnestness in complying with Islamic values which may have implications on winning the trust of Muslim investors largely from oil-rich Arab Gulf Region which have flush of funds currently. Thus, the purpose of the study is to gauge the extent of the corporate ethical identity (CEI) that is being incorporated by the Shari’ah Compliant companies in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used the content analysis to develop CEI by adding all the items covering the four themes, which were underlying philosophy and values, interest-free and Islamically acceptable activities, developmental and social goals and environment theme. This CEI index was developed by using the dichotomous, which the score of ‘1’, if the company disclose the items and ‘0’, if it is not. The process will add all the scores and equally weighted.

Findings

The study showed that the level of communicated ethical identity disclosed in annual reports of Shari’ah Compliant companies for the year ended 2008 is relatively low with average of 23.66%. Overall, the findings of the study showed that the Shari’ah Compliant companies revealed more communicated ethical identity on Theme 1 (underlying philosophy and values) in the annual reports for the year ended 2008. In addition, in the year 2008, the findings showed that the dimension of developmental and social goals has the most influence towards the ethical identity index of Shari’ah Compliant companies.

Research limitations/implications

The source of data in this study is limited to companies’ annual report. In other words, the extent of communicated ethical identity index is constructed limited to company’s annual report. The study has shown that annual reports is not the only means or medium of disclosure. Hence, studying other forms of disclosure on communicated ethical identity could possibly complement and add value to any investigation on the nature and extent of communicated ethical identity through annual reports in the future.

Practical implications

The study is expected to alert the Securities Commission with regard to the definition of Shari’ah Compliant companies which should not just include ‘good public perception and image company’ but also the extent of the application of Islamic values in the conduct of their businesses.

Originality/value

The study provides a new benchmark of an ideal Islamic communicated CEI index based on Shari’ah principles and also past literatures. The study developed a checklist from preliminary checklist with 88 items based on Berrone, Surroca, and Tribo (2005), Haniffa and Hudaib (2007) and Roshima, Yuserrie and Hasnah (2009). In order to develop the checklist, the researchers also look on the definition of Islamic ethics defined by Khan (2009).

Details

Ethics, Governance and Corporate Crime: Challenges and Consequences
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-674-3

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Maimunah Ismail, Muhammad Ibnu Kassim, Mohd Rozi Mohd Amit and Roziah Mohd Rasdi

This exploratory study aims to investigate how the role of the CSR manager is influenced by his orientation to corporate social responsibility (CSR) responsibilities, his…

Abstract

Purpose

This exploratory study aims to investigate how the role of the CSR manager is influenced by his orientation to corporate social responsibility (CSR) responsibilities, his attitude and competency.

Design/methodology/approach

The study involved 112 managers of CSR-implementing companies in the Klang Valley, a highly industrialized region in Malaysia. They were chosen based on a systematic random sampling technique.

Findings

The study found that the level of role, orientation and competency of CSR managers was high, whereas that for attitude was moderate. Further, regression analysis results showed that the managers’ orientation to economic and ethical responsibilities as well as competency significantly influenced their role in CSR with an explanatory power of 20.1 per cent.

Research limitations/implications

The study was cross-sectional in nature. Nevertheless, it involved a sample of company managers from a selected location in the country. The predictor variables were limited to orientation to economic, legal, ethical and philanthropic responsibilities; attitude; and competency.

Practical implications

The study highlights the importance of personal qualities of the manager and also the manager’s role in promoting community development CSR. These findings should be capitalized on by managers and other practitioners in CSR.

Originality/value

The study findings contribute to research on CSR that is viewed from the perspective of corporate image being projected by the role of CSR managers, as influenced by their CSR orientation, attitude and competency. Recommendations for CSR and human resource development practice and future research on the predictors of the role of CSR managers are proposed.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2018

Mohd Zaidi Md Zabri and Mustafa Omar Mohammed

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the Malaysian homeowners’ intention to participate in the Cash Waqf-Financial Cooperative-Musharakah Mutanaqisah (CWFCMM) home…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the Malaysian homeowners’ intention to participate in the Cash Waqf-Financial Cooperative-Musharakah Mutanaqisah (CWFCMM) home financing model using rigorous scale validation procedures.

Design/methodology/approach

An adapted questionnaire with 26 items was administered to 382 academic and supporting staffs, postgraduate and undergraduate students in three states in Malaysia. The data were analyzed using exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis with SPSS 21 and AMOS 21, respectively.

Findings

The results further support the parsimonious nature theory of planned behavior (TPB) with its three original construct of attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control and an additional construct of perceived cost advantages of the CWFCMM Model. A validated TPB scale with 24 items measured can be proposed to be used as an evaluative tool to assess the level to which the homeowners are interested to participate in the CWFCMM Model.

Research limitations/implications

The modified TPB scale would also facilitate the identifications of factors that influence homeowners’ intention to opt for Islamic home financing (IHF) by non-bank Islamic financial institutions such as financial cooperative.

Practical implications

The CWFCMM Model aims to harness the potential synergy between third-sector economy players such as waqf and financial cooperatives in offering affordable IHF solution to potential homeowners.

Social implications

The CWFCMM Model may enable the Malaysian homeowners to enjoy a more affordable IHF solution, thereby, among others, reducing the purchase and monthly repayment affordability of Malaysians.

Originality/value

There is a dearth of Islamic financial services selection studies, especially within the non-banking, Islamic financial services milieu. The CWFCMM Model, which has been developed by the authors, enriches the limited literature on this subject matter. It will also add value to understand how the customers would react to an alternative IHF provider.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 44 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 May 2020

Mohd Hafiz Hanafiah and Nurul Alia Aqilah Hamdan

The demand for Muslim friendly tourism industry has been gaining momentum from the increasing number of Muslim travellers globally. This paper aims to examine the role of…

Abstract

Purpose

The demand for Muslim friendly tourism industry has been gaining momentum from the increasing number of Muslim travellers globally. This paper aims to examine the role of religiosity in Muslim travellers Halal food consumption attitude and behaviour while travelling to the non-Muslim destination.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 384 respondents participated in this study through an online survey. This study used the partial least square structural equation modelling to assess the survey measurements and hypotheses testing.

Findings

This study asserts that the Muslim travellers’ Halal consumption attitude relies heavily on their level of religiosity, subjective norms and perceived control behaviour. Besides, the results provide evidence that consumption attitude mediates the relationship between religiosity, subjective norm, perceived behavioural control and intention in consuming Halal food products while travelling abroad.

Practical implications

This study highlighted the critical aspects of an emerging Muslim market that travel for leisure with the urge to comply with their Islamic teachings and religiosity. It is vital for non-Muslim tourism destination marketers to tailor their marketing strategies and consider promoting Islamic dietary rules when planning their travel packages.

Originality/value

This study is one of the few that focus on Muslim-friendly tourism and the role of religiosity in Muslim traveller’s Halal food consumption behaviour. This study confirms that the theory of planned behaviour model can be used to explain Muslim travellers Halal food consumption attitude while travelling to a non-Muslim destination.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 17 July 2014

Abstract

Details

Ethics, Governance and Corporate Crime: Challenges and Consequences
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-674-3

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