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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2021

Muhammad Khalilur Rahman, Md Sohel Rana, Mohd Nazari Ismail, Mohd Zulkifli Muhammad, Muhammad Nazmul Hoque and Md. Abdul Jalil

Tourists often travel to different tourism destinations in advancing the knowledge of diverse cultures, environments, history and social aspects. The purpose of this study…

Abstract

Purpose

Tourists often travel to different tourism destinations in advancing the knowledge of diverse cultures, environments, history and social aspects. The purpose of this study is to explore tourists’ perception of halal tourism and its impact on word-of-mouth towards halal tourism destinations.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative research approach was applied in this study. Data were collected via 375 survey questionnaires and were analysed using partial least square method. Data were collected from Malaysia’s capital city and tourist spots in Kuala Lumpur, the administrative capital city in Putrajaya, and several cities in Selangor, the richest state in the country.

Findings

The findings revealed that trip quality has a higher significant impact on satisfaction and trip value. The perception of a halal tourism destination is found to have a significant influence on satisfaction and trip value. Trip value is significantly related to satisfaction but not associated with word-of-mouth (WOM). Satisfaction of tourists has a significant impact on WOM towards travel destinations.

Research limitations/implications

This study comes up with a novel understanding of the theory of tourism practices by estimating non-Muslim tourists’ perception and its significant influence of WOM towards tourism destinations. The results of this study are significant to industry practitioners, policymakers and marketers in promoting halal tourism. The results of this study provide useful insights for Malaysia’s tourism industry, particularly for the tourism marketing in Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya cities as tourist destinations.

Practical implications

This study comes up with a novel understanding of the theory of tourism practices by estimating non-Muslim tourists’ perception and the influence of WOM towards tourism destinations. The results of this study are significant to industry practitioners, policymakers and marketers in promoting halal tourism.

Originality/value

This study examined the potential impact of non-Muslim tourists’ perception of halal tourism destinations and their WOM for halal tourism destinations.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Md Arphan Ali, Muhammad Khalilur Rahman, Mahfuzur Rahman, Mohamed Albaity and Md Abdul Jalil

– The purpose of this paper is to explore the critical factors that influence Muslim consumers’ motivation towards the Islamic market mechanism.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the critical factors that influence Muslim consumers’ motivation towards the Islamic market mechanism.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper also attempts to formulate Ibnomer Mohamed Sharfudddin’s “Islamic Administrative theory and Klaus Hurrelmann’s socialization theory” based on the “productive processing of reality (PPR)” model. The data were collected by distributing a self-administered questionnaire to a sample of 147 participants residing in the major cities in Peninsular Malaysia. The constructs and items used in the questionnaire were derived from the basic guidelines provided in the literature review and Al-Qur’an and Sunnah (Prophet’s deeds) on the conduct of Malaysian business practices.

Findings

The results suggest that while awareness of the Islamic market mechanisms exists amongst businesses, in practice, not many obey such rules. However, a significant relationship does exist between the Muslim consumer motivational factors and Islamic market mechanisms.

Research limitations/implications

First, limitation in scope as only two main components (productive service and commodity market) practices was examined. Future research may include other types of variables practices in the Islamic market mechanism. Second, the sample size is small and respondents were restricted to marketing and the academic sector. Future research should be done on bigger sample size and more on diverse sample, such as extended to the manufacturing sector and the service industry because manufacturing firms and the service sector might have different Islamic market mechanism practices and outcomes compared to marketing and the academic sector.

Practical implications

Productive service and commodity market have positive impact on consumers’ motivation towards the Islamic market mechanism. Government’s controlling and monitoring in the market has positive effect on consumers’ motivation in selecting the Islamic market mechanism.

Social implications

There is a need for more research on how to establish the Islamic market mechanism practice. In addition, the outcomes of this paper are of particular significance to policymakers, as it better informs them as to how best to design the Islamic market mechanism to make it more practical regardless of various religious beliefs.

Originality/value

This research is a rare attempt on the part of scholars and researchers in Malaysia to relate the Islamic market mechanism practices and guidelines on a specific discipline. Based on the researchers’ knowledge, it is the first study investigating the application of the Islamic market mechanism practice in Malaysia.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2015

Mohammad Abdul Jalil, Rabindra Chandra Sinha, A.K.M. Mahabubuzzaman, Md. Milon Hossain and Mohammad Arafat Idris

A study is performed on the properties of jute-pineapple leaf fiber (PALF) blended yarn and 100% jute yarn. The jute-PALF blend ratios of two counts of yarn (5 and 7…

Abstract

A study is performed on the properties of jute-pineapple leaf fiber (PALF) blended yarn and 100% jute yarn. The jute-PALF blend ratios of two counts of yarn (5 and 7 lbs/spy) are 70:30 and 80:20 respectively. The physical properties of the blended yarns such as load at break, strain at break, tenacity at break, tensile modulus and quality ratio are tested and measured. It is observed from the test results that the physical properties of the blended yarns are better than those of the 100% jute yarn. The experimental results also show that the physical and structural properties of the blended yarn changes with the increase of PALF in the blend ratio. So the blending of PALF has a positive impact on yarn properties. Another study is done, in which it is found that surface appearance properties like color strength (K/S value) and whiteness, yellowness and brightness indices of the blended yarns are almost the same as those of the jute yarn due to the blending of jute-PALF. Therefore, the blending ratio does not cause any notable changes in the natural color of the jute yarn.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 October 2018

Mohd Zaidi Md Zabri and Mustafa Omar Mohammed

This study aims to validate a potential synergistic venture between cash waqf (Islamic endowment) institutions (CWIs) and financial cooperatives (FCs) in the provision of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to validate a potential synergistic venture between cash waqf (Islamic endowment) institutions (CWIs) and financial cooperatives (FCs) in the provision of affordable Islamic home financing (IHF) in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted semi-structured interviews with ten experts to validate the cash waqf-financial-cooperative-mushārakah mutanāqiṣah (CWFCMM) model. Thematic analysis technique was used to analyse the verbatim texts.

Findings

The findings show that the majority of the informants have positive perceptions of the potential of the CWFCMM model to provide financially affordable IHF products in Malaysia. Nevertheless, this study sheds light on the varying degrees of latent issues and challenges that might arise in the implementation of this model. For example, FCs need to practice the correct business model, implement good governance structures and employ the right people. Meanwhile, CWIs need to work on their accountability issues by publishing their audited accounts in mainstream newspapers, much like what is being done by non-governmental organisations such as the widely recognised Malaysian Medical Relief Society (MERCY Malaysia).

Research limitations/implications

This study interviewed a small, industry-specific number of informants in generating its findings. Time and budget constraints are some of the limiting factors in carrying out the study. Because of these factors, the generalisation of the study’s findings will be limited.

Practical implications

First, the CWFCMM model offers an alternative, financially affordable IHF instrument to low- and middle-income households in Malaysia. Second, the involvement of third-sector institutions such as FCs and CWIs in the provision of IHF will reduce the burden of the government in its spending on home financing solutions for civil servants. Third, this model will harness the potential of waqf-based financing beyond the contemporary limited applications to mosques, graveyards and taḥfīẓ (Qurʾan memorization) schools.

Originality/value

This study presents an alternative IHF model that transcends the current institutional framework that is heavily dominated by Islamic commercial banks and government-owned home financing institutions. The study does not focus on a single third-sector institution but on an integration of at least two of them, CWIs and FCs, in implementing the IHF model.

Details

ISRA International Journal of Islamic Finance, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0128-1976

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2018

Mohd Zaidi Md Zabri and Mustafa Omar Mohammed

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the Malaysian homeowners’ intention to participate in the Cash Waqf-Financial Cooperative-Musharakah Mutanaqisah (CWFCMM) home…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the Malaysian homeowners’ intention to participate in the Cash Waqf-Financial Cooperative-Musharakah Mutanaqisah (CWFCMM) home financing model using rigorous scale validation procedures.

Design/methodology/approach

An adapted questionnaire with 26 items was administered to 382 academic and supporting staffs, postgraduate and undergraduate students in three states in Malaysia. The data were analyzed using exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis with SPSS 21 and AMOS 21, respectively.

Findings

The results further support the parsimonious nature theory of planned behavior (TPB) with its three original construct of attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control and an additional construct of perceived cost advantages of the CWFCMM Model. A validated TPB scale with 24 items measured can be proposed to be used as an evaluative tool to assess the level to which the homeowners are interested to participate in the CWFCMM Model.

Research limitations/implications

The modified TPB scale would also facilitate the identifications of factors that influence homeowners’ intention to opt for Islamic home financing (IHF) by non-bank Islamic financial institutions such as financial cooperative.

Practical implications

The CWFCMM Model aims to harness the potential synergy between third-sector economy players such as waqf and financial cooperatives in offering affordable IHF solution to potential homeowners.

Social implications

The CWFCMM Model may enable the Malaysian homeowners to enjoy a more affordable IHF solution, thereby, among others, reducing the purchase and monthly repayment affordability of Malaysians.

Originality/value

There is a dearth of Islamic financial services selection studies, especially within the non-banking, Islamic financial services milieu. The CWFCMM Model, which has been developed by the authors, enriches the limited literature on this subject matter. It will also add value to understand how the customers would react to an alternative IHF provider.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 44 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Book part
Publication date: 21 November 2018

Tariqur Rahman Bhuiyan, Mohammad Imam Hasan Reza, Er Ah Choy and Joy Jacqueline Pereira

Kuala Lumpur, the capital of Malaysia, is exposed to several natural hazards, among which flash floods are most common and frequent. Expanding development and higher…

Abstract

Kuala Lumpur, the capital of Malaysia, is exposed to several natural hazards, among which flash floods are most common and frequent. Expanding development and higher intensity of rainfall are the primary causes of flash floods. As the urbanisation is growing, the number of exposed properties, people and business premises are also increasing. This may have a detrimental impact on the socio-economic state of the city. Therefore, the purpose of this chapter is to investigate the frequency and intensity of flash flood occurrences between 2011 and 2016 and to delineate how it is impacting the urban livelihood. For this study, several news reports of flash flood events, previously published and reports were reviewed to elicit information so that the frequency and intensity of flash floods can be analysed for identifying flash flood risk areas. Along with the information from newspapers, Google map was used to identify the spatial locations of flash flood events, thus identifying the risk zones. This study found the City Centre as the most risk prone to flash floods. It was noted that 39% of flash floods occurred in this place. The Damansara-Penchala area comes in the second position with 20% of flash floods occurring in this place. Most of the people of these zones are exposed to flash flood and the affected people suffer from road blocking and heavy traffic jam. This study will help researchers and policymakers to understand the impact of flash floods in the city. This will also help to identify the most flood-prone areas of the city.

Details

Improving Flood Management, Prediction and Monitoring
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-552-4

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2020

Jian Pei Kong, Basmawati Baharom, Norshariza Jamhuri, Khalizah Jamli, Siti Farah Zaidah Mohd Yazid, Norafidza Ashiquin, Lina Isnin, Chooi Wah Leow and Siew Mee Lim

The provision of meals has long been regarded as an essential part of treatment of hospitalized patients complementing medical procedures and nursing management. Today…

Abstract

Purpose

The provision of meals has long been regarded as an essential part of treatment of hospitalized patients complementing medical procedures and nursing management. Today, despite changes in the health-care landscape, which focused on improving the quality and efficiency of hospital care, malnutrition among inpatient was still a common worldwide concern.

Design/methodology/approach

This was a multi-centre, randomized study conducted in 21 study sites comprising 21 state and specialist government hospitals under the Ministry of Health, Malaysia. The sample size for this study was calculated with purposive sampling method, followed by proportionate sampling to determine the random sample size of each of the study sites. The total sample size required for this study was 2,759 subjects. A validated data collection form was used in the study.

Findings

Only 32.2 % and 37.6 % of subjects achieved adequate energy and protein intake, respectively, during their admission to medical ward. The study result showed that the overall mean energy and protein intake was 794.6 ± 487.8 kcal and 35.2 ± 24.3 g, respectively. The estimated energy (p = 0.001) and protein (p = 0.001) intake of all study sites was significantly lower compared to the adequacy value.

Research limitations/implications

The adequacy intake in this study was only carried out in medical wards, thus reproducible result among other wards in different study sites could not be confirmed. Besides, this study assumed that the portion eaten by subjects during lunch and dinner was the same, and therefore, either one was recorded together with breakfast and either lunch or dinner to represent a subject’s daily intake.

Originality/value

This was the first nationwide study to report the adequacy of energy and protein intake of patients receiving therapeutic diets in the government hospital setting in Malaysia.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 50 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Book part
Publication date: 12 July 2021

Abstract

Details

Water Management and Sustainability in Asia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-114-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2019

Mohamed Albaity and Mahfuzur Rahman

Several research models have been proposed in the existing literature to understand the intention to use Islamic banking where conventional bank customers are not…

Abstract

Purpose

Several research models have been proposed in the existing literature to understand the intention to use Islamic banking where conventional bank customers are not primarily addressed. Upon measuring the level of Islamic financial literacy (IFL) among the customers of conventional banks in the UAE, the purpose of this paper is to examine the direct and indirect effects of IFL, awareness, cost and benefit, reputation and attitude towards Islamic banking on the intention of potential customers to use Islamic banking.

Design/methodology/approach

Using judgmental sampling techniques, questionnaires were distributed to working individuals who did not have accounts with Islamic banks. A total of 350 completed and usable questionnaires were received and used for further analysis. The SmartPLS 3.0 software was used to analyse the data.

Findings

The results revealed that the level of IFL was high across the respondents and differed significantly as a function of gender, income level and years of work experience. The findings showed that IFL, awareness, reputation and attitude towards Islamic banking significantly influenced the intention to use Islamic banking, while cost and benefit appear not to. Interestingly, IFL was negatively correlated with the intention to use Islamic banking, but when the attitude towards Islamic banking mediated the relationship between IFL and the intention to use Islamic banking it then became positive.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should consider looking at non-Muslim economies, which might be more vulnerable to IFL. In addition, a comparison between the current customers of Islamic banks and potential customers might be relevant to see whether the IFL of the current customers differs from the new customers.

Practical implications

The implications of the research are twofold. First the study suggests that IFL is crucial for an Islamic bank’s potential new customers. Islamic bank managers should design and focus their policies toward enriching the knowledge of the public about Islamic banks and their products. Second, IFL alone does not lead to a higher level of intention to use Islamic banks unless there is a positive attitude towards such banks.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is one of the first studies to consider the IFL measure used in this paper. Therefore, this study will be the foundation for future research on IFL.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2018

Mohammad Enamul Hoque, Nik Mohd Hazrul Nik Hashim and Mohammad Hafizi Bin Azmi

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a conceptual framework that can facilitate investigations concerning the impact of marketing communication and financial…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a conceptual framework that can facilitate investigations concerning the impact of marketing communication and financial consideration on the relationship between customer attitude and purchase intention of Islamic banking products and services.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper is structured based on the extant literature; it provides a review of theoretical perspectives, highlights the gap and illustrates the significance for developing a framework.

Findings

The authors identify notable patterns and limitations in previous empirical studies. Specifically, despite increasing interest in Islamic banking customer behavior, prior research has not given much attention to explore moderating effects on the customer attitude–intention link. This has left researchers and bank managers with very limited information to explain the conditions that enhance customers’ attitude and intentions toward Islamic banking products. Based on this backdrop, the paper displays a viable research model with propositions that assess potential moderating effects on the domain relationship.

Research limitations/implications

This paper contributes to Islamic banking and management literature because prior research has predominantly focused on variables that directly influence customers’ behavior. This novel conceptual framework enables managers to better understand their customers and has implications for emerging themes, such as formulating strategies for specific customer groups and internationalization process. In addition, this paper provides a starting point to empirically examine whether and how the proposed moderators affect the link between customer attitude and behavioral intentions to purchase Islamic banking products.

Originality/value

To the best of knowledge, this is the first attempt to introduce relevant moderating variables for investigating the attitude and intention nexus in an Islamic banking context. Furthermore, the authors propose a new measure, namely, profit-loss sharing proportions which could enhance customers’ intention to purchase Islamic banking products.

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