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Book part

Joel Gehman

The concept of institution has been used by scholars from across a number of disciplines to explain a wide variety of phenomena. However, the philosophical roots of this…

Abstract

The concept of institution has been used by scholars from across a number of disciplines to explain a wide variety of phenomena. However, the philosophical roots of this concept have not been well examined, nor have implications for contemporary institutional analysis been fully appreciated. Returning to the works of Husserl and Merleau-Ponty reveals a depth of thinking that has otherwise been overlooked by institutional theorists. In particular, the author’s analysis reveals two critical insights. First, whereas organizational scholars have closely linked the concepts of institution and taken-for-grantedness, these two concepts were originally understood to be phenomenologically distinct. Second, a detailed examination of Merleau-Ponty’s later work poses the concept of flesh – the twining of the visible and the invisible – as the basis for the interplay of institutions. In turn, the idea of flesh as the foundation of institution invites a more radical reimagining of the growing bifurcation between microfoundations and macrofoundations.

Details

Macrofoundations: Exploring the Institutionally Situated Nature of Activity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-160-5

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Article

Hervé Colas

The general aim of this paper is to shift the interest in two particular stakeholders, the entrepreneur and the company itself, from a vision based on a company perceived…

Abstract

The general aim of this paper is to shift the interest in two particular stakeholders, the entrepreneur and the company itself, from a vision based on a company perceived as a stock package towards an aesthetic perception of its creation. It intends to link creative entrepreneurship and creativity in the arts. Emanating from the phenomenological thought of Maurice Merleau‐Ponty on artistic vision, this research intends to read the motivations of a creator by a calling, that amounts to a counter‐gift to the beauty of the world. This motivation to create can be articulated in two non‐financial impulses: to dis‐cover and to correct. A sketch portrait of a French entrepreneur is depicted to illustrate the urge to create a small business. A stakeholder understanding is suggested, taking into account schutzian multiple orders of reality.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article

Nathan Harter

The pursuit of innovation depends on creativity as a competency, yet creativity-especially in organizational settings — is difficult to understand, let alone manage. By…

Abstract

The pursuit of innovation depends on creativity as a competency, yet creativity-especially in organizational settings — is difficult to understand, let alone manage. By consulting works of Maurice Merleau-Ponty (art), Martin Heidegger (philosophy), and Hannah Arendt (political science), this article offers a composite account of creativity that suggests the aggressive pursuit of creativity in an organizational setting should include an expenditure of effort by leaders to create a social environment where participants can reflect upon and accept their own inner creativity, known as natality, as well as the creativity of others as a collective response to aspects of a reality we ordinarily overlook.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

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Book part

David Gilling

Few organisations exhibit the importance of physicality in leadership as explicitly as the symphony orchestra. While usually attributed to the direction of the conductor…

Abstract

Few organisations exhibit the importance of physicality in leadership as explicitly as the symphony orchestra. While usually attributed to the direction of the conductor my own experience suggests that leading in orchestral performance is grounded in physical relations between individuals and among instrumental groups across the orchestra as much as in the interaction between musicians and maestro. In order to further interrogate this experience while enhancing our understanding of onstage relations among orchestral musicians, I recently undertook research that employed an autoethnographic methodology underpinned by the phenomenology of Merleau-Ponty (2002, 2004) and the sense-making ideas of Weick (1995, 2001a). Using this method while drawing on ideas such as kinaesthetic empathy (Pallaro, 1995; Parviainen, 2002), the picture presented in what follows is one of leadership embedded in physical interaction among colleagues.

This interaction is, I suggest, based on sense-making and sense-giving activity that occurs in a ‘kinaesthetic loop’ that draws on and is generated by auditory, visual and gestural information given and received by individual musicians. This activity in turn mediates the acoustic space between musicians and thus, ultimately, determines how leadership and coordination in the orchestra are constituted. Rather than being disembodied products of dictatorial direction dispensed through the orchestra’s hierarchy, orchestral performance and leadership emerge in this more nuanced account as co-creative processes in which all the musicians on stage share responsibility.

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The Physicality of Leadership: Gesture, Entanglement, Taboo, Possibilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-289-0

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Article

John M. Budd

To examine work on phenomenology and determine what information studies can learn and use from that work.

Abstract

Purpose

To examine work on phenomenology and determine what information studies can learn and use from that work.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a literature‐based conceptual analysis of pioneering work in phenomenology (including that of Edmund Husserl, Martin Heidegger, Paul Ricoeur, and others), application of such ideas as intentionality and being in information studies work, and the potential for greater application of the information seeker as other.

Findings

The literature on phenomenology contains thought that is directly relevant to information studies and information work. Close examination of perception, intentionality, and interpretation is integral to individuals’ activities related to searching for and retrieving information, determining relevance, and using technology. Essential to the realization of phenomenology's potential is adoption of communication by dialogue so that an information seeker is able both to conceptualize need and to articulate that need. Some promising work in information studies demonstrates an openness to the ongoing and continuous perceptual experiences of information seekers and the relation of that process of perceiving to the growth of knowledge.

Originality/value

Offers a different way of thinking about human‐information relationships and the ways that information professionals can interact with information seekers.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 61 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article

Suhas Govind Joshi

This study introduces a phenomenological approach to the design of enabling technologies for older adults focusing on capabilities rather than disabilities. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study introduces a phenomenological approach to the design of enabling technologies for older adults focusing on capabilities rather than disabilities. The purpose of this paper is to use embodied experiences to structure an alternative understanding of the human–technology relationship and demonstrates the significance and implications of this approach.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 31 older citizens (M=80.5 years, SD=5.97 years) were engaged in a participatory design process revolving around the embodied experiences of the participants. The aim was to design new wireless chargers for their existing enabling technologies. The paper presents design results and statistical analyses of performance evaluations.

Findings

The co-designed alternatives were compared to the current alternative. The statistical analyses revealed an average increase in performance of 45.35 percent across all participants when using designs anchored in embodied experiences. The significance of these results suggests that a shift from disabilities to capabilities provides new opportunities to understand and facilitate interaction between older adults and technology.

Research limitations/implications

The study follows the theoretical argument into real-use scenarios involving co-designed artifacts to demonstrate how the suggested approach can be a viable alternative strategy to how we facilitate the design of enabling technologies for older adults.

Originality/value

The suggested design approach contributes to the ongoing development of enabling technologies for older adults by introducing a respectful and inclusive alternative strategy.

Details

Journal of Enabling Technologies, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6263

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Article

Nihel Chabrak, Jim Haslam and Helen Oakes

The purpose of this paper is to reflect a critical perspective drawing from phenomenology, especially informed by a reading of Heidegger, to enhance and extend…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reflect a critical perspective drawing from phenomenology, especially informed by a reading of Heidegger, to enhance and extend appreciation of the need to question accounting’s meaning or delineation and how research might be undertaken into the accounting phenomenon and related areas.

Design/methodology/approach

To illustrate and clarify argumentation in terms of accounting mobilization and the domain of accounting research, the mainstream and strongly positivistic accounting perspective adopted in the USA is critically assessed. At the same time, the authors elaborate how much of interpretive research (including much of that labeled critical) is also lacking in terms of the perspective articulated here.

Findings

The paper stresses the case for questioning the taken-for-granted and conventional. It promotes reflexivity, cautious pragmatism, attentiveness to the value of the existing, responsibility to difference and otherness and openness to new possibilities as part of a deeper critical orientation.

Originality/value

The paper draws from phenomenology, especially in Heideggerian terms to open-up new conversational domain to debate accounting.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Rewriting Leadership with Narrative Intelligence: How Leaders Can Thrive in Complex, Confusing and Contradictory Times
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-776-4

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Article

Wendelin Küpers

The purpose of this article is to develop a critical and extended understanding of practices in organizations from a phenomenological point of view. It explores the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to develop a critical and extended understanding of practices in organizations from a phenomenological point of view. It explores the relevance of Merleau-Ponty's advanced phenomenology and ontology for understanding the role of the lived body and the embodiment of practices and change in organizational lifeworlds.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the literature review and phenomenology, the role of embodied and relational dimension, the concept of an emergent and responsive “inter-practice” in organizations is developed systematically.

Findings

Based on the phenomenological and relational approach, the concept of (inter-)practice allows an extended more integral and processual understanding of the role of bodily and embodied practices in organizational lifeworlds as emerging events. The concept of inter-practice(ing) contributes to conceiving of new ways of approaching how responsive and improvisational practicing, related to change, coevolves within a multidimensional nexus of organizations.

Research limitations/implications

Specific theoretical and methodological implications for exploring and enacting relational practices as well as limitations are offered.

Practical implications

Some specific practical implications are provided that facilitate and enable embodied practices in organizational contexts.

Social implications

The responsive inter-practice is seen as embedded in sociality and social interactions and links to sociocultural and political as well as ethical dimensions are discussed.

Originality/value

By extending the existing discourse and using an embodied approach, the paper proposes a novel orientation for reinterpreting practice that allows explorations of the emergence and realization of alternative, ingenious and more suitable forms of practicing and change in organizations.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article

William L. Waugh and Wesley W. Waugh

Phenomenologists are among the strongest opponents of logical positivism. Mostly associated with Edmund Husserl, phenomenology is essentially an analytical method or…

Abstract

Phenomenologists are among the strongest opponents of logical positivism. Mostly associated with Edmund Husserl, phenomenology is essentially an analytical method or framework for describing and explaining social relationships and psychological orientations. Phenomenologists attempt to account for the subjective qualities which logical positivists and empiricists assume to be unreal or are mistakenly treated as objective observable phenomena. The authors note that phenomenology has been absorbed into the literature and the language of the field especially in terms of how people do and do not relate to bureaucratic organizations and government programs.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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