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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Coral Houtman, Maureen Thomas and Jennifer Barrett

The purpose of this paper is to address the advantages of education and training in creating the “Audiovisual/Digital Media Essay” (AV/DME), starting from visual and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the advantages of education and training in creating the “Audiovisual/Digital Media Essay” (AV/DME), starting from visual and cinematic thinking as a way of setting up, developing and concluding an argument.

Design/methodology/approach

Recognising the advantages to education and training of the “AV/DME” this paper explores ways of enabling visually disciplined students to work on film theory within their chosen medium, and to develop arguments incorporating audiovisual sources, using appropriate academic skills. It describes a hands-on BA/MA workshop held at Newport Film School (May 2011) and subsequent initial implementation of an examinable DME. The paper contextualises the issue in the light of practice-led and practice-based research and of parity with written dissertations. Drawing on analysis of in-depth interviews with students and tutors, it makes practical recommendations for how to resource, staff and support the implementation and continuation of the AV/DME and/or dissertation.

Findings

The paper feeds back from both students and staff on the running of an initial AV/DME workshop and finds that the Film School Newport is suited to running the AV/DME and suggests a framework for its support.

Research limitations/implications

The study needs to be followed up when the students complete their full dissertations.

Practical implications

The AV/DME needs sufficient technical and human resources to support student learning.

Originality/value

The paper provides a clear and original framework for teaching, supporting and assessing the AV/DME. This framework can be disseminated beyond the University of Wales Newport, and can be used to teach the AV/DME in further contexts and to wider groups of students.

Book part
Publication date: 1 September 2015

Howard Lune

How do transnational social movements organize? Specifically, this paper asks how an organized community can lead a nationalist movement from outside the nation. Applying…

Abstract

How do transnational social movements organize? Specifically, this paper asks how an organized community can lead a nationalist movement from outside the nation. Applying the analytic perspective of Strategic Action Fields, this study identifies multiple attributes of transnational organizing through which expatriate communities may go beyond extra-national supporting roles to actually create and direct a national campaign. Reexamining the rise and fall of the Fenian Brotherhood in the mid-nineteenth century, which attempted to organize a transnational revolutionary movement for Ireland’s independence from Great Britain, reveals the strengths and limitations of nationalist organizing through the construction of a Transnational Strategic Action Field (TSAF). Deterritorialized organizing allows challenger organizations to propagate an activist agenda and to dominate the nationalist discourse among co-nationals while raising new challenges concerning coordination, control, and relative position among multiple centers of action across national borders. Within the challenger field, “incumbent challengers” vie for dominance in agenda setting with other “challenger” challengers.

Details

Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-359-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Roger K. Doost

PurposeThis paper aims to discuss one of the most critical issues of our time, impediments to global ethics, and seeks to explore the question more intensely for a better…

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Abstract

PurposeThis paper aims to discuss one of the most critical issues of our time, impediments to global ethics, and seeks to explore the question more intensely for a better outcome.Design/methodology/approachThe Robert J. Rutland Center for Ethics at Clemson University was the venue for an annual four‐day event to reflect and discuss ethics, ethical principles, and the framework for ethical decision making. The theme for 2004's seminar was Ethics in Politics – the 5th Annual Ethics across the Curriculum. Four philosophy professors each presented ethics from a slightly different angle with specific cases provided to better illustrate the points raised. In addition, several cases were assigned to groups while each of the four professors acted as discussion leaders.FindingsThe paper begins with the information provided by the seminar instructors. It is followed by the creeping case – a case that is followed by a series of variations that change it in important ways. Additional suggestions are provided for analysis of the case. Some concluding remarks are provided at the end together with relevant passages from the 9/11 Commission Report.Originality/valueThis paper is the writer's contribution to the seminar in the form of a creeping case on the ethics of oil, weapons, and the Middle East.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 20 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2022

Maureen Snow Andrade

The COVID-19 pandemic impacted the workplace in significant ways, creating changes in the daily work routines of individuals globally, many of which are likely to be…

Abstract

Purpose

The COVID-19 pandemic impacted the workplace in significant ways, creating changes in the daily work routines of individuals globally, many of which are likely to be permanent. Women, in particular, were affected by increased childcare responsibilities and faced with decisions about the future of their careers. The purpose of this practitioner article is to present an overview of work-related challenges and opportunities resulting from COVID-19, introduces the concept of family supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB), and shares ideas for application.

Design/methodology/approach

The concept of FSSB offers insights into the role of supervisors in the adoption of family-friendly approaches that not only mitigate the challenges women, and parents in general, face in the workplace but offers organizations the opportunity to assess the degree to which these practices are present and adopt relevant training and policies. The paper examines the literature on FSSB.

Findings

The review identifies ways in which organizations can apply FSSB to support women (and all parents) in the workplace. These include a better understanding of the supervisor role, the need to examine policies and practice and make supervisors accountable and direction for FSSB training.

Originality/value

The paper shares key outcomes of FSSB and provides practical ways for its implementation by leaders and managers. It links the challenges and opportunities of COVID-19 to enhanced FSSB practices.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Elizabeth Daniel, Elizabeth Hartnett and Maureen Meadows

Social media such as blogs are being widely used in organizations in order to undertake internal communication and share knowledge, rendering them important boundary…

Abstract

Purpose

Social media such as blogs are being widely used in organizations in order to undertake internal communication and share knowledge, rendering them important boundary objects. A root metaphor of the boundary object domain is the notion of relatively static and inert objects spanning similarly static boundaries. A strong sociomaterial perspective allows the immisciblity of object and boundary to be challenged, since a key tenet of this perspective is the ongoing and mutually constituted performance of the material and social. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The aim of the research is to draw upon sociomateriality to explore the operation of social media platforms as intra-organizational boundary objects. Given the novel perspective of this study and its social constructivist ontology, the authors adopt an exploratory, interpretivist research design. This is operationalized as a case study of the use of an organizational blog by a major UK Government department over an extended period. A novel aspect of the study is the use of data released under a Freedom of Information request.

Findings

The authors present three exemplar instances of how the blog and organizational boundaries were performed in the situated practice of the case study organization. The authors draw on the literature on boundary objects, blogs and sociomateriality in order to provide a theoretical explication of the mutually constituted performance of the blog and organizational boundaries. The authors also invoke the notion of “extended chains of intra-action” to theorize changes in the wider organization.

Originality/value

Adoption of a sociomaterial lens provides a highly novel perspective of boundary objects and organizational boundaries. The study highlights the indeterminate and dynamic nature of boundary objects and boundaries, with both being in an intra-active state of becoming challenging conventional conceptions. The study demonstrates that specific material-discursive practices arising from the situated practice of the blog at the respective boundaries were performative, reconfiguring the blog and boundaries and being generative of further changes in the organization.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 December 2018

Lorraine Eden

The digital economy, which heralds the start of the Fourth Industrial Revolution (IR4), is upon us. What can history teach international business scholars about how firms…

Abstract

The digital economy, which heralds the start of the Fourth Industrial Revolution (IR4), is upon us. What can history teach international business scholars about how firms are likely to respond to this new form of technological change? Who are the likely winners or the likely losers? For 30 years, the author has lived through, studied, and written about the Third Industrial Revolution and other major environmental shocks, ranging from new entrants to academia to regional integration to outbreak of war, looking at the fundamental issues of how individuals, firms, communities, and countries respond to and are affected by life-changing events. In this chapter, the author tells seven brief stories about living through and studying “shocks and responses.” Perhaps, some of these stories may provide useful lessons to the scholars of IR4.

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2010

Steve McKenna

The purpose of this paper is to explore the use of a dialogical approach, associated with the Russian literary critic and philosopher Bakhtin, in understanding the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the use of a dialogical approach, associated with the Russian literary critic and philosopher Bakhtin, in understanding the portrayal of managerial identity in management narratives. In particular, it applies these ideas critically to understand how managers' identities are partly shaped by the dominant discourse or idea about what a manager should “be.”

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on three written narratives of managers. It applies a dialogical approach to consider how they position themselves interactionally in the narratives in such a way as to highlight a managerial identity based on being “enterprising” and “for change,” while simultaneously voicing alternative identities negatively. The use of the written narratives of managers and the application of a dialogical approach is an important contribution to the literature.

Findings

The findings suggest that managers, when reflecting on organizational events through narrative, assume a managerial identity that reflects current dominant discourse about what a manager should “be.” In doing so they reject other possible discourses that offer alternatives, not only to managerial “being,” but also to what management and organizations might reflect and represent. The paper also, however, recognizes that some managers reject this identity and its implications for organizational activity.

Research limitations/implications

The paper suggests that managerial identity is partly a product of a dominant discursive/ideological formation rather than individual choice. Although managers may reject this interpellation creating an alternative is constrained by the regime of truth that prevails about what management is at any given time. The approach might be considered overly deterministic in its view of managerial identity.

Originality/value

The paper extends the understanding of managerial identity and how it is portrayed through narrative by using a dialogical approach to interpretation.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 2 June 2022

Antoinette Halsell Miranda, Halima Alhassan and Maureen J. Ito

Identity construction is a dynamic process that encompasses a variety of factors such as commonalities, loyalties, power struggles, and survival instincts (Lei, 2003). The…

Abstract

Identity construction is a dynamic process that encompasses a variety of factors such as commonalities, loyalties, power struggles, and survival instincts (Lei, 2003). The complex dimensions of Black identity are influenced, in part, by community, comfort, and acceptance which at times imposes fixed categorizations, characteristics, and singular depictions. Recent research suggests that more attention be paid to the needs of Black adolescent girls and how their race and gender impact what happens in schools (Koonce, 2012). Moreover, it challenges and influences academic success, as it is challenging and difficult to excel in environments that fail to value every aspect of one's identity or identities (Rollock, 2007).

Black girls' interaction with each other, especially in urban schools, can also be problematic and resemble “relational aggression,” when in fact it is a form of posturing to increase their social status. Contextual factors (e.g., culture, school climate) can serve as risk or protective factors for involvement in posturing, relationship aggression, or increasing one's social status. Research focused on peer relationships has found differences in friendship patterns among ethnically and socioeconomically diverse youth, suggesting the importance of examining friendships within the context of ethnic and socioeconomic diversity (see Brown, Way, & Duff, 1999; Crothers, Field, & Kolbert, 2005). Sisterhood among Black girls can serve as a supportive network that enhances the “Black girl experience” as well as promote wellness and healthy identity.

Details

African American Young Girls and Women in PreK12 Schools and Beyond
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-532-0

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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2016

William Beaver, Maureen McNichols and Richard Price

We highlight key assumptions implicit in the models used by academics conducting research on market efficiency. Most notably, many academics assume that investors can…

Abstract

We highlight key assumptions implicit in the models used by academics conducting research on market efficiency. Most notably, many academics assume that investors can borrow unlimited amounts and construct long-short portfolios at zero cost. We relax these assumptions and examine the attractiveness of long-short strategies as stand-alone investments and as a part of a diversified portfolio. Our analysis illustrates that the key benefit of long-short investing is adding diversification to a portfolio beyond what the market provides. We show that as stand-alone investments, nontrivial risk remains in the “hedge” strategies and that the returns generally do not beat the market in a head-to-head contest. Our findings raise questions about the degree of inefficiency in anomaly studies because plausible measures of costs generally offset strategy returns. The ability to achieve greater diversification may be, but is not necessarily, due to market inefficiency. We also highlight the key role of the generally ignored but critically important short interest rebate and show that absent this rebate, the long-short strategies we examine generally yield insignificant returns.

Details

Journal of Accounting Literature, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-4607

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Article
Publication date: 14 February 2019

Laurence Dessart and Maureen Duclou

This paper aims to determine the impact of online community participation on attitudes and product-related behaviour in the health and fitness sector.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine the impact of online community participation on attitudes and product-related behaviour in the health and fitness sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data are collected from 221 users of the social medium Instagram, members of the self-proclaimed health and fitness community (#fitfam). Data are analysed with structural equation modelling.

Findings

The study shows that online community identification and engagement significantly increase health environment sensitivity, resulting in heightened engagement in physical fitness and healthy product choices.

Social implications

Given the difficulty to remain engaged in pro-health behaviour and the growing impact of social media on young adults’ lives, these findings are encouraging. They show that online health and fitness communities provide a supportive environment in which consumers can identify and freely engage and a fertile ground to the development of health sensitivity and product-related behaviour.

Originality/value

The study advances knowledge on the role of social media and online communities in promoting health and fitness product behaviours and attitudes.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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