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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2007

Maureen Royce

To devise a human resource management (HRM) approach capable of application to the management of employees in social enterprises.

Abstract

Purpose

To devise a human resource management (HRM) approach capable of application to the management of employees in social enterprises.

Design/methodology/approach

The difficulty of applying traditional HRM techniques to social enterprises, where the workforce tends to be volunteers, is discussed. Reviews HRM concepts and their relationship/applicability to social enterprise (labour market relationships within social enterprise, resourcing and skills to support social enterprise, leadership and operational strategy within social enterprise). Presents two case studies, involving an inner city credit union in northwest England; and an inner city after‐school club. Reports on a pilot questionnaire survey focusing on the strands identified by the earlier research.

Findings

The results indicated a heavy reliance on volunteer labour with almost all organizations working with volunteers. Notes, however, that when asked whether volunteers were crucial to the running of the organization, only 59 per cent felt they were, with the remaining 41 per cent being uncertain or felt that volunteers were not crucial and only a small fraction (12 per cent) having more volunteers than paid workers. Reveals that the infrastructure to support coherent people‐management systems in social enterprise do not appear to be robust and piecemeal support and advice through a range of well‐meaning board members, fragile networks and higher education institutes cannot provide a strong framework for growth and sustainability in managing human resources in the social enterprise sector. Concludes that labour market relationships, resourcing and skills, and leadership and operational strategy have nevertheless been recurring themes in research in this field which suggests that there may be a very real opportunity for HRM tools and expertise to support social enterprise organizations in achieving their business and social goals.

Originality/value

Sheds light on the HRM aspects of social enterprises.

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1980

GENERAL MANAGER Harry Murray was telling me that his Imperial Hotel is the acme of conference centres when I noticed on his reservations chart a booking for the launch of…

Abstract

GENERAL MANAGER Harry Murray was telling me that his Imperial Hotel is the acme of conference centres when I noticed on his reservations chart a booking for the launch of a new Rolls Royce. It seemed an appropriate even for what undoubtedly is the Rolls Royce of business venues.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 80 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Abbas J. Ali, Manton Gibbs and Robert C. Camp

The subject of Jihad has been a fiercly debated topic in the past few decades. Contradictory translations have been adopted by differing religious groups and political…

Abstract

The subject of Jihad has been a fiercly debated topic in the past few decades. Contradictory translations have been adopted by differing religious groups and political camps. In some quarters Jihad has been associated with violence and war. Other quarters perceive the Jihad to mean a striving within oneself and the struggle for self‐improvement. In this paper, the historical and contemporary perspectives of Christianity, Judaism, and Islam regarding Jihad are outlined. The evolution of the meaning of Jihad in each religion is clarified and similarities and dissimilarities among the three religions are highlighted. Various forms of Jihad are presented. The paper, however, argues that true Jihad means an active participation in social improvement and economic development. In addition, the paper provides implications of Jihad for business and organizations.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 23 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1984

Arthur E. Carey and Kjestine R. Carey

Gambling has been a part of the human experience for a long time, perhaps as long as humans have interacted socially. Its literature has been accumulating since ancient…

Abstract

Gambling has been a part of the human experience for a long time, perhaps as long as humans have interacted socially. Its literature has been accumulating since ancient times, with references found in some of the earliest records. Throughout history gambling has had a bad reputation because of the multitude of social problems attributed to it. The gambling industry today refers to the activity as “gaming,” which does not sound quite as notorious.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1978

JUST a year ago the Bullock Report was published with a ffurry of trumpets. We expressed our opinion on it then and we have no reason to change it now.

Abstract

JUST a year ago the Bullock Report was published with a ffurry of trumpets. We expressed our opinion on it then and we have no reason to change it now.

Details

Work Study, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2012

Karen Pfeffer, Maureen Maxwell and Amie Briggs

The aims of this study are to examine the influence of offender age, offender abuse history, crime outcome and attributions for crime on judgments about young offenders.

Abstract

Purpose

The aims of this study are to examine the influence of offender age, offender abuse history, crime outcome and attributions for crime on judgments about young offenders.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 240 British undergraduates was asked to respond to a scenario about a young person who committed a crime, recommend a sentence, and rate the young offender's criminal accountability and legal understandings. Their attributions for crime were measured using the CDS‐II, adapted for observer attributions. The age of the young offender (ten years, 14 years, or 17 years), abuse history (abused or not abused) and crime outcome (victim death or injury) were varied systematically.

Findings

Internal attributions predicted participants' beliefs about punishment and sentencing recommendations. Although participants considered the youngest offenders to be less criminally accountable and unlikely to understand the legal process, this did not affect recommended punishment. Attributions of personal control were influenced by abuse history; the behavior of offenders with a history of abuse was considered less within the offender's personal control.

Originality/value

The results demonstrate the types of attributions and information that influence the opinions of jury‐eligible British adults when asked to make decisions about serious offences committed by young offenders.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 November 2019

Evert Gummesson

The purpose of this viewpoint is to analyze and interpret the author’s career as a researcher in marketing.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this viewpoint is to analyze and interpret the author’s career as a researcher in marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

This viewpoint applies case theory (Gummesson, 2017a), in which the author is the case.

Findings

One should respect the difficulty of understanding the complex and dynamic world of marketing and not be fooled into premature generalizations and reverence to established theory.

Originality/value

The emphasis is on marketing as a revenue-generating activity through interaction in the network of complex relationships; the need for less ritualistic research methodology; and the orientation toward theory generation, decision-making, implementation and achievement of desired results.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Allan Metz

President Bill Clinton has had many opponents and enemies, most of whom come from the political right wing. Clinton supporters contend that these opponents, throughout the…

Abstract

President Bill Clinton has had many opponents and enemies, most of whom come from the political right wing. Clinton supporters contend that these opponents, throughout the Clinton presidency, systematically have sought to undermine this president with the goal of bringing down his presidency and running him out of office; and that they have sought non‐electoral means to remove him from office, including Travelgate, the death of Deputy White House Counsel Vincent Foster, the Filegate controversy, and the Monica Lewinsky matter. This bibliography identifies these and other means by presenting citations about these individuals and organizations that have opposed Clinton. The bibliography is divided into five sections: General; “The conspiracy stream of conspiracy commerce”, a White House‐produced “report” presenting its view of a right‐wing conspiracy against the Clinton presidency; Funding; Conservative organizations; and Publishing/media. Many of the annotations note the links among these key players.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2009

Charles H. Cho and Dennis M. Patten

This investigation/report/reflection was motivated largely by the occasion of the first Centre for Social and Environmental Accounting Research (CSEAR) “Summer School” in…

Abstract

This investigation/report/reflection was motivated largely by the occasion of the first Centre for Social and Environmental Accounting Research (CSEAR) “Summer School” in North America.1 But its roots reach down as well to other recent reflection/investigation pieces, in particular, Mathews (1997), Gray (2002, 2006), and Deegan and Soltys (2007). The last of these authors note (p. 82) that CSEAR Summer Schools were initiated in Australasia, at least partly as a means to spur interest and activity in social and environmental accounting (SEA) research. So, too, was the first North American CSEAR Summer School.2 We believe, therefore, that it is worthwhile to attempt in some way to identify where SEA currently stands as a field of interest within the broader academic accounting domain in Canada and the United States.3 As well, however, we believe this is a meaningful time for integrating our views on the future of our chosen academic sub-discipline with those of Gray (2002), Deegan and Soltys (2007), and others. Thus, as the title suggests, we seek to identify (1) who the SEA researchers in North America are; (2) the degree to which North American–based accounting research journals publish SEA-related research; and (3) where we, the SEA sub-discipline within North America, might be headed. We begin with the who.

Details

Sustainability, Environmental Performance and Disclosures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-765-3

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