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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2018

Ilan Kelman, Bayes Ahmed, Md Esraz-Ul-Zannat, Md Mustafa Saroar, Maureen Fordham and Mohammad Shamsudduha

The purpose of this paper is to connect the theoretical idea of warning systems as social processes with empirical data of people’s perceptions of and actions for warning…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to connect the theoretical idea of warning systems as social processes with empirical data of people’s perceptions of and actions for warning for cyclones in Bangladesh.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach is used in two villages of Khulna district in southwest Bangladesh: Kalabogi and Kamarkhola. In total, 60 households in each village were surveyed with structured questionnaires regarding how they receive their cyclone warning information as well as their experiences of warnings for Cyclone Sidr in 2007 and Cyclone Aila in 2009.

Findings

People in the two villages had a high rate of receiving cyclone warnings and accepted them as being credible. They also experienced high impacts from the cyclones. Yet evacuation rates to cyclone shelters were low. They did not believe that significant cyclone damage would affect them and they also highlighted the difficulty of getting to cyclone shelters due to poor roads, leading them to prefer other evacuation options which were implemented if needed.

Originality/value

Theoretical constructs of warning systems, such as the First Mile and late warning, are rarely examined empirically according to people’s perceptions of warnings. The case study villages have not before been researched with respect to warning systems. The findings provide empirical evidence for long-established principles of warning systems as social processes, usually involving but not relying on technical components.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Cheney Shreve, Belinda Davis and Maureen Fordham

Holistic approaches to public health such as “One Health” emphasize the interconnectedness between people, animals, ecosystems, and epidemic risk, and many advocate for…

Abstract

Purpose

Holistic approaches to public health such as “One Health” emphasize the interconnectedness between people, animals, ecosystems, and epidemic risk, and many advocate for this philosophy to be adopted within disaster risk management (DRM). Historically, animal and human diseases have been managed separately from each other, and apart from other hazards considered for DRM. Shifts in DRM, however, may complement a One Health approach. The taxonomy of hazards considered under DRM has expanded to include medical and social crises such as epizootics and terrorism. However, there is a gap in understanding how epidemic risk is integrated into DRM at the community-level. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

TACTIC adopts a participatory case study approach examining preparedness for multiple hazard types (floods, epidemics, earthquakes, and terrorism) at the community-level. This paper reports on findings from the epidemic case study which took as its focus the 2001 foot-and-mouth disease epidemic in the UK because of the diverse human, social, and environmental impacts of this “animal” disease.

Findings

Epizootic preparedness tends to focus on biosecurity and phytosanitary measures, and is geared towards agriculture and farming. Greater engagement with public health and behavioural sciences to manage public health impacts of animal disease epidemics, and activities for citizen engagement to improve preparedness are discussed. The impermeability of boundaries (hazard, institutional, disciplinary, etc.) is a key constraint to integrating One Health into DRM.

Originality/value

This work helps to situate the One Health discussion within the community-level DRM context.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1995

Dennis Parker, Maureen Fordham, Sylvia Tunstall and Anne‐Michelle Ketteridge

Discusses the results of evaluations of flood forecasting, warningand response systems in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.Reveals that in England and Wales…

Abstract

Discusses the results of evaluations of flood forecasting, warning and response systems in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. Reveals that in England and Wales flood warning systems often underperform. Despite technical sophistication and their elevation to high priority in central government′s flood defence strategy, arrangements for flood warnings are now under considerable stress because of lack of agreement over organizational roles and responsibilities. Legal ambiguities, funding difficulties and ideological positions lie behind these problems. Flood warning systems are developing in Scotland, and there is now a “fledgling” system in Northern Ireland, but both lag behind England and Wales. Examines implications for the future.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Elaine Enarson and Lourdes Meyreles

This article provides an introduction and assessment of the English and Spanish literatures on gender relations in disaster contexts. We analyze regional patterns of…

Abstract

This article provides an introduction and assessment of the English and Spanish literatures on gender relations in disaster contexts. We analyze regional patterns of differences and similarities in women’s disaster experiences and the differing research questions raised by these patterns in the scholarly and practice‐based literature. The analysis supports the claim that how gender is theorized makes a difference in public policy and practical approaches to disaster risk management. We propose new directions in the field of disaster social science and contribute a current bibliography in the emerging gender and disaster field.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 24 no. 10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Abstract

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Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Abstract

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Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2001

Abstract

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2002

Abstract

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

Abstract

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Abstract

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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