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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2011

Maureen Casile, Kristine F. Hoover and Deborah A. O'Neil

The purpose of this paper is to expand the understanding of outcomes of service‐learning/community engagement. The current study explored the efficacy of service‐learning…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to expand the understanding of outcomes of service‐learning/community engagement. The current study explored the efficacy of service‐learning as a pedagogical tool to support content mastery by undergraduates in a management class.

Design/methodology/approach

The study involved a classroom experiment with 120 students randomly assigned to complete a service‐learning or a research project as a class requirement. Data regarding mastery of course content was collected through a multiple‐choice assessment at the end of the course, and analyzed using statistical methods.

Findings

Results showed that service‐learning can be a better mechanism for student mastery of course concepts than a traditional research project. However, the benefits of service‐learning appeared to accrue disproportionately to women.

Research limitations/implications

Results suggest that educators should incorporate service‐learning into their classrooms to enhance content mastery, and that future research should examine the specific elements of service‐learning that contribute to both female and male students' learning. The findings are limited to traditional undergraduate students in a face‐to‐face management course.

Originality/value

This research study directly addresses some of the tensions between service‐learning/student‐community engagement and traditional university education. Service‐learning has been shown to support student development of socially valuable outcomes. Inclusion of service‐learning in college curricula can be particularly challenging, when a desire for ethical development must be balanced with course content mastery. According to the findings of the current study, service‐learning produces both service to the community and service to the students, as an effective pedagogical tool for content mastery.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 53 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2011

Michelle D. Lane and Maureen Casile

By proposing a comprehensive measurement framework, this paper attempts to move the nascent body of theoretical and empirical work on performance measurement in social…

Abstract

Purpose

By proposing a comprehensive measurement framework, this paper attempts to move the nascent body of theoretical and empirical work on performance measurement in social entrepreneurship ventures (SEVs) into reach for practitioners. The purpose of this paper is to help social entrepreneurs and academics put current knowledge to work to gain usable feedback about the success of operations.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper offers a framework for measuring firm survival, social action, and social change in SEVs based on a review of theoretical and empirical work.

Findings

Early work in SEV performance measurement shows consensus that social impact is at least as important as organizational viability, albeit more difficult to measure. The SEV measurement framework developed herein creates the link between firm viability (Survival), direct social action (Action), and long‐term social impact on the technical, political, and cultural aspects of society (Change) leading to the SAC framework.

Originality/value

The framework proposed in the paper gives practitioners a guide for comprehensive performance measurement based on their unique organizational mission using the SAC model. Widespread use of a measurement tool that addresses viability, action, and impact, may ultimately improve the efficiency with which SEVs attack social problems.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 November 2011

Bob Doherty

Abstract

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2019

Louisi Francis Moura, Edson Pinheiro de Lima, Fernando Deschamps, Eileen Van Aken, Sergio E. Gouvea da Costa, Fernanda Tavares Treinta and José Marcelo Almeida Prado Cestari

In the performance measurement and management research field, the applicability of performance measurement systems (PMS) in nonprofit organizations (NPOs) and public…

Abstract

Purpose

In the performance measurement and management research field, the applicability of performance measurement systems (PMS) in nonprofit organizations (NPOs) and public administration has been considered a challenge. The diversity of these organizations makes it difficult to define proper terminology and organizational characteristics. PMS evolution has not yet been able to capture all performance dimensions of a public administration and, especially for NPO considering its dynamic and multiple goals. The purpose of this paper is to provide a conceptual framework that identifies and classifies the factors that influence the design of PMSs in NPOs and public administration.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was developed through a systematic literature review (SLR). A set of 29 papers were intensely studied, and the results provide a multi-disciplinary and holistic set of factors.

Findings

A set of ten factors that influence the design of PMSs in NPO and public administration were found. They were categorized into three groups: factor related to purpose, stakeholders and management.

Originality/value

The study synthesized the literature and provided a conceptual framework of the factors that influence the design of PMSs in NPO and public administration. No individual paper collected in the SLR shows a similar organization of the factors as the present paper. The set of factors indicates the importance of this study for NPO and public administration, and how complex a PMS in an NPO and public administration can become. The conceptual model presented can further assist practitioners in developing design process observing the role that the identified factors play.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 68 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2011

Juliet Millican and Tom Bourner

The purpose of this Editorial is to introduce key themes in the area of student‐community engagement (SCE) and the papers included in this special issue.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this Editorial is to introduce key themes in the area of student‐community engagement (SCE) and the papers included in this special issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses dominant trends in the current context.

Findings

The selection of papers in this issue represent the range of programmes that have been developed over the past five or so years and indicate what they have, and have not been able to achieve. However, the recent context indicates an acceleration of the expectations placed on higher education to develop socially responsible citizens and to create graduates who will be able to solve the complex problems of an increasingly complex world.

Originality/value

The paper provides a background to SCE and the changing role and context of higher education.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 53 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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