Search results

1 – 10 of 27
Open Access
Article
Publication date: 28 January 2020

Mattias Elg, Ida Gremyr, Árni Halldórsson and Andreas Wallo

Conducting research that is both practice- and theory-relevant is important for the service research community. Action research can be a fruitful approach for service…

4700

Abstract

Purpose

Conducting research that is both practice- and theory-relevant is important for the service research community. Action research can be a fruitful approach for service researchers studying the transformative role of service research and wanting to make contributions to both the research community and to practical development. By exploring the current use of action research in service research, this study aims to make suggestions for enhancing the contribution to theory and practice development and to propose criteria for research quality for action research in service research.

Design/methodology/approach

This study builds on a systematic literature review of the use of action research approaches in service research.

Findings

The study makes three main contributions. First, it posits that any action research project needs to consider the four elements of problem identification, theorization, creating guiding concepts and intervention. Second, based on these elements mirrored in service action research, it outlines and analyzes three approaches to action research (i.e. theory-enhancing, concept developing and practice-enhancing). Third, it suggests a move from instrumental to a more conceptual relevance of the research and elaborates on the criteria for research quality.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the understanding of how action research may be applied for conducting high-quality collaborative research in services and proposes measures to enhance research quality in action research projects focusing services.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2019

Hannah Snyder, Lars Witell, Mattias Elg and Janet R. McColl-Kennedy

When using a service, customers often develop their own solutions by integrating resources to solve problems and co-create value. Drawing on innovation and creativity…

Abstract

Purpose

When using a service, customers often develop their own solutions by integrating resources to solve problems and co-create value. Drawing on innovation and creativity literature, this paper aims to investigate the influence of place (the service setting and the customer setting) on customer creativity in a health-care context.

Design/methodology/approach

In a field study using customer diaries, 200 ideas from orthopedic surgery patients were collected and evaluated by an expert panel using the consensual assessment technique (CAT).

Findings

Results suggest that place influences customer creativity. In the customer setting, customers generate novel ideas that may improve their clinical health. In the service setting, customers generate ideas that may improve the user value of the service and enhance the customer experience. Customer creativity is influenced by the role the customer adopts in a specific place. In the customer setting customers were more likely to develop ideas involving active customer roles. Interestingly, while health-care customers provided ideas in both settings, contrary to expectation, ideas scored higher on user value in the service setting than in the customer setting.

Research limitations/implications

This study shows that customer creativity differs in terms of originality, user value and clinical value depending on the place (service setting or customer setting), albeit in one country in a standardized care process.

Practical implications

The present research puts customer creativity in relation to health-care practices building on an active patient role, suggesting that patients can contribute to the further development of health-care services.

Originality/value

As the first field study to test the influence of place on customer creativity, this research makes a novel contribution to the growing body of work in customer creativity, showing that different places are more/less favorable for different dimensions of creativity. It also relates customer creativity to health-care practices and highlights that patients are an untapped source of creativity with first-hand knowledge and insights, importantly demonstrating how customers can contribute to the further development of health-care services.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 53 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 November 2018

Jason Martin, Mattias Elg, Andreas Wallo and Henrik Kock

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to a better understanding of the role of learning in performance measurement.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to a better understanding of the role of learning in performance measurement.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors develop a theoretical framework combining workplace learning theory with purposes of performance measurement. The authors elaborate this framework empirically by identifying critical incidents from a case set within a context containing a broad range of different performance measurement activities. Finally, the authors discuss the results and the possible implications for using the theoretical framework in order to better understand facets of learning regarding the design of performance measurement.

Findings

Workplace learning theory provides a deeper understanding of how the mechanisms of performance measurements support control or improvement purposes. The authors propose a tentative framework for learning as a driver for performance measurement and four facets of learning are identified: reproductive, rule-oriented, goal-oriented and creative learning.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical material is limited to the healthcare context and further studies are needed in order to validate the findings in other settings.

Practical implications

The authors argue that all managers must consider what kind of learning environment and what kind of learning outcomes best serve the interests of their organisation. Purposeful and carefully designed organisational arrangements and learning environments are more likely to induce intended learning outcomes.

Originality/value

Previous connections between the fields of “performance measurement” and “workplace learning” often lack any deeper conceptualisations or problematisations of the concept of learning. In this paper, the authors provide a more nuanced discussion about the process of learning in performance measurement, which may provide a basis for further research and scholarly attention.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 67 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Janet R. McColl-Kennedy, Hannah Snyder, Mattias Elg, Lars Witell, Anu Helkkula, Suellen J. Hogan and Laurel Anderson

The purpose of this paper is to synthesize findings from health care research with those in service research to identify key conceptualizations of the changing role of the…

4043

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to synthesize findings from health care research with those in service research to identify key conceptualizations of the changing role of the health care customer, to identify gaps in theory, and to propose a compelling research agenda.

Design/methodology/approach

This study combines a meta-narrative review of health care research, and a systematic review of service research, using thematic analysis to identify key practice approaches and the changing role of the health care customer.

Findings

The review reveals different conceptualizations of the customer role within the ten key practice approaches, and identifies an increased activation of the role of the health care customer over time. This change implies a re-orientation, that is, moving away from the health care professional setting the agenda, prescribing and delivering treatment where the customer merely complies with orders, to the customer actively contributing and co-creating value with service providers and other actors in the ecosystem to the extent the health care customer desires.

Originality/value

This study not only identifies key practice approaches by synthesizing findings from health care research with those in service research, it also identifies how the role of the health care customer is changing and highlights effects of the changing role across the practice approaches. A research agenda to guide future health care service research is also provided.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 5 November 2020

Per-Erik Ellström, Mattias Elg, Andreas Wallo, Martina Berglund and Henrik Kock

This paper introduces interactive research as an emerging approach within a broad family of collaborative research approaches in management and organization research…

2787

Abstract

Purpose

This paper introduces interactive research as an emerging approach within a broad family of collaborative research approaches in management and organization research. Interactive research is a way to contribute to the dual tasks of long-term theory development and innovation and change processes in organizations. One of the distinguishing features of interactive research is a focus on continuous joint learning processes between the researchers and the involved practitioners.

Design/methodology/approach

The basic concepts, contributions and challenges of the interactive research approach are presented and illustrated in the present paper through a practical case, the HELIX Centre.

Findings

Interactive research is a way to advance scientific knowledge about the development of new types of work organizations and the development of sustainable operations. The multi-disciplinary and interactive research approach at HELIX has made it possible to reach a high degree of both rigour and relevance in research questions and projects. The authors identified five principles from the HELIX case that were instrumental in accomplishing the dual tasks of interactive research.

Originality/value

The interactive research approach is a powerful method of collaboration between different stakeholders throughout the research process. This type of research makes it possible to interact at various levels of research, from the programme level, to research and development projects, to the individual level. The results from interactive research should not only be considered traditionally valid but also valid in relation to organizational and societal needs.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 September 2019

Jason Martin, Mattias Elg and Ida Gremyr

The purpose of this paper is to use competence theory to explore the fit between actual competencies of quality management (QM) practitioner and the perception of QM…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use competence theory to explore the fit between actual competencies of quality management (QM) practitioner and the perception of QM competence needs in organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a cross-case quantitative study design featuring a survey of QM practitioners (n =249) within eight large Swedish organisations. The research instrument was a questionnaire covering seven themes within QM. The analysis is based on descriptive statistics.

Findings

The results show that while the perception of formal QM competence may seem sufficient, the evolving nature of QM requires knowledge, skills and attitudes that are also apt for more external and explorative perspectives. There is a bias towards competence for exploitative QM rather than explorative QM. Organisational logics preserving and possibly reinforcing a perceived “competence lag” in organisations are identified and described.

Originality/value

Few empirical studies within QM explore the competencies required for QM practices. This paper contributes to QM research in providing arguments for adopting the competence theory as a foundation for organising current and future QM work.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 27 July 2021

Ida Gremyr, Jan Lenning, Mattias Elg and Jason Martin

Over one million organisations have a quality management system (QMS) certified to the ISO 9001 standard; however, the system requires a lot of resources and its value has…

3894

Abstract

Purpose

Over one million organisations have a quality management system (QMS) certified to the ISO 9001 standard; however, the system requires a lot of resources and its value has been questioned. This critique also leads to a questioning of the strategic relevance of quality management. The purpose of this paper is to explore how different types of uses of QMS correlate with management perceptions of quality management in terms of respect, cost and strategic importance.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a mixed method data collection strategy, quantitative data being collected from a survey in 8 organisations (n = 108) and qualitative data being collected from 12 interviews with quality managers in 12 different organisations.

Findings

The paper shows that a compliance-oriented QMS usage will more likely lead to a view of quality management as costly and of little respect, than a business or improvement-oriented QMS usage. Moreover, it nuances the view on compliance-oriented usage, showing that it is mainly documentation that negatively influences how management views quality management, whereas standardisation that is part of the compliance-oriented use is perceived as more value-adding.

Originality/value

This paper suggests three types of QMS use, namely, business management, improvement, and compliance-oriented use, and that a wise selection of how to use the QMS will affect the respect, strategic importance and cost that management associates with quality management.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2007

Mattias Elg

The purpose of this paper is to show how the present article illuminates the process of how information is constructed in performance measurement systems.

4513

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how the present article illuminates the process of how information is constructed in performance measurement systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The main argument for using performance measurement is that it creates possibilities for managers to gain knowledge about what is going on within the organization and direct future behaviour. The effectiveness of such a knowledge creation process is partly dependent on local circumstances of how information is being created.

Findings

In large scale performance measurement systems we can expect that several people are involved in constructing information. These people are either directly involved or have indirect influence over the construction process. Different motives and cognition play an important role as information is shaped and reshaped from the collection of raw data until its final usage in management settings.

Research limitations/implications

The research field is provided with an alternative view of what it means to work with performance measurement. This includes decomposition of the traditional mechanistic view of performance measurement.

Practical implications

Practitioners are urged to be reflective and careful in their usage of performance measurement as they cannot be viewed as objective facts of reality.

Originality/value

The paper contributes with knowledge in an underdeveloped field of research, namely quality of information. It may provide a basis for further research and scholarly analysis.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2011

Beata Kollberg and Mattias Elg

The purpose of this paper is to identify the main characteristics of the Balanced Scorecard (BSC) practice in health care services

8559

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the main characteristics of the Balanced Scorecard (BSC) practice in health care services

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a case study approach focusing on three health care organisations in Sweden using the BSC. The focus is upon different management levels in a hierarchical branch in each organisation.

Findings

The paper concludes that the BSC is used as a tool for improving internal capabilities and supporting organisational development. More specifically, the BSC is used as a tool by management and employees in discussions, information dissemination, knowledge creation, follow‐up and reporting processes. Instead of using the BSC as a tool to implement and communicate strategy formulated by management it is used as a tool for opening up the organisation and providing a foundation for an improvement dialogue, which consequently increases the demands on management.

Research limitations/implications

The paper contributes to changing the focus in existing research away from the design and construction of the BSC towards its use in managerial work.

Practical implications

The paper emphasises important aspects in using the BSC in a health care context that will help managers in improving performance measurements.

Originality/value

The paper shows that the use of the BSC includes several aspects, such as the purpose of the system, implementation process, actions taken and the expected contribution.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 60 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2013

Mattias Elg, Klara Palmberg Broryd and Beata Kollberg

– The purpose of this study is to contribute to the knowledge base on how performance measurement drives improvements in healthcare practice.

4712

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to contribute to the knowledge base on how performance measurement drives improvements in healthcare practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a single in-depth case study. The critical incident technique (CIT) has been applied in order to identify significant occurrences of performance measurement in terms of events, incidents, processes, and issues identified by respondents from the case organization. These critical incidents have been analysed and interpreted using a theoretical framework suggesting that performance measurement may be applied for exploratory or regulatory purposes as well as ad hoc or continuously in healthcare practice.

Findings

The study suggests that performance measurement may be a versatile method for driving improvement in healthcare organizations. Six types of activities directly or indirectly drive improvement in the clinical department: continuous follow-up in formal arenas and meetings; improvement work; professional efforts; goal deployment; reporting based on external demands; and creating awareness in everyday clinical work. Healthcare organizations that strive to practice performance measurement as a driver for improvement need to find infrastructures in which it is being integrated into the daily life of organizational healthcare practice.

Originality/value

The study provides an original account of the prerequisites and actions for driving improvement through performance measurement in a healthcare setting. Since the operations management perspective in healthcare is significantly lacking, the study offers a unique perspective which may be the basis for both practice development and further scholarly inquiry and theory development.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 33 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

1 – 10 of 27