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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2015

Matthias Lehner

– This paper aims to contribute to the discussion about how retailers can more effectively promote sustainable food consumption in the retail store.

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2875

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to contribute to the discussion about how retailers can more effectively promote sustainable food consumption in the retail store.

Design/methodology/approach

Thirteen self-proclaimed sustainable consumers were observed and interviewed during their grocery shopping. Separate observations were conducted of the stores. Finally, consumers were asked to provide three weeks worth of grocery shopping receipts.

Findings

Results show that the meaning of sustainable consumption varies among consumers. Observed consumer behaviour was mostly routinized, with little willingness to engage consciously with the choice situation. Mixed messages in the store cause confusion, uncertainty and frustration. Only for a minority of decisions, consumers showed a high level of decision-making involvement. Then, consumers were willing to engage with the retailer and accept trade-offs. The retail store should better account for consumption routines in sustainable consumption behaviour and open up to interaction with sustainably minded consumers where necessary.

Research limitations/implications

The results are specific for urban areas with high concern for sustainability. Further research should focus on areas of low concern for sustainability and the impact of the store environment on such consumers.

Practical implications

Retailers do not sufficiently take into account the contextual nature of sustainable consumption. Retailers would be well-advised to account for the habitual nature of grocery shopping and for contextually defined understanding of sustainable consumption in their efforts to promote sustainable consumption.

Originality/value

This study gives new insights into the much debated “attitude-behaviour gap” in sustainable consumption and how retailers can more effectively encourage sustainable consumption behaviour in the retail store.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Matthias Lehner

Retailers are facing pressure to promote sustainable consumption. Building on literature about the role of retailers as “translators” of the sustainability discourse, this…

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4075

Abstract

Purpose

Retailers are facing pressure to promote sustainable consumption. Building on literature about the role of retailers as “translators” of the sustainability discourse, this paper studies how retailers cope with this pressure. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This study focuses on the Swedish retail sector. In 22 interviews with retail representatives and 13 store observations it explores the way food retailers approach sustainable consumption, particularly focusing on the role retail stores receive in operationalising sustainable consumption.

Findings

The retail store is identified as important organisational layer within retailers to operationalise sustainable consumption. However, retailers do not acknowledge this potential sufficiently. An idealised model of multi-layered sensemaking to successfully promote sustainable consumption is presented.

Research limitations/implications

The study results only cover a small part of the entire retail organisation and only provide a snapshot in time of their working. Future research should study how the internal process of translating sustainability to the market develops over time and how it is connected to different parts of the retail organisation (e.g. marketing, HR). More research is also necessary to specify the division of responsibilities between headquarters (HQs) and stores.

Practical implications

This paper proposes a divide of responsibilities between HQs and the individual store to better deal with societal pressures and market demand.

Originality/value

The results of this study add depth to the theoretical notions of “translation” and “sensemaking” in retailers’ efforts to promote sustainable consumption. A model for how this process works is provided.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 43 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Sebastian Grabmaier, Matthias Jüttner and Wolfgang Rucker

Considering the vector Helmholtz equation in three dimensions, this paper aims to present a novel approach for coupling the finite element method and a boundary integral…

Abstract

Purpose

Considering the vector Helmholtz equation in three dimensions, this paper aims to present a novel approach for coupling the finite element method and a boundary integral formulation. It is demonstrated that the method is well-suited for many realistic three-dimensional problems in high-frequency engineering.

Design/methodology/approach

The formulation is based on partial solutions fulfilling the global boundary conditions and the iterative interaction between them. In comparison to other coupling formulation, this approach avoids the typical singularity in the integral kernels. The approach applies ideas from domain decomposition techniques and is implemented for a parallel calculation.

Findings

Using confirming elements for the trace space and default techniques to realize the infinite domain, no additional loss in accuracy is introduced compared to a monolithic finite element method approach. Furthermore, the degree of coupling between the finite element method and the integral formulation is reduced. The accuracy and convergence rate are demonstrated on a three-dimensional antenna model.

Research limitations/implications

This approach introduces additional degrees of freedom compared to the classical coupling approach. The benefit is a noticeable reduction in the number of iterations when the arising linear equation systems are solved separately.

Practical implications

This paper focuses on multiple heterogeneous objects surrounded by a homogeneous medium. Hence, the method is suited for a wide range of applications.

Originality/value

The novelty of the paper is the proposed formulation for the coupling of both methods.

Details

COMPEL - The international journal for computation and mathematics in electrical and electronic engineering, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0332-1649

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Article
Publication date: 21 May 2019

Holger Schallehn, Stefan Seuring, Jochen Strähle and Matthias Freise

The purpose of this paper is to propose a conceptual framework of experience co-creation that captures the multi-dimensionality of this construct, as well as a research…

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1211

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a conceptual framework of experience co-creation that captures the multi-dimensionality of this construct, as well as a research process for defining of the antecedents of experience co-creation.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework of experience co-creation was conceptualized by means of a literature review. Subsequently, this framework was used as the conceptual basis for a qualitative content analysis of 66 empirical papers investigating alternative consumption models (ACMs), such as renting, remanufacturing, and second-hand models.

Findings

The qualitative content analysis resulted in 12 categories related to the consumer and 9 related to the ACM offerings that represent the antecedents of experience co-creation. These categories provide evidence that, to a large extent, the developed conceptual framework allows one to capture the multi-dimensionality of the experience co-creation construct.

Research limitations/implications

This study underscores the understanding of experience co-creation as a function of the characteristics of the offering – which are, in turn, a function of the consumers’ motives as determined by their lifeworlds – as well as to service design as an iterative approach to finding, creating and refining service offerings.

Practical implications

The investigation of the antecedents of experience co-creation can enable service providers to determine significant consumer market conditions for forecasting the suitability and viability of their offerings and to adjust their service designs accordingly.

Originality/value

This paper provides a step toward the operationalization of the dimension-related experience co-creation construct and presents an approach to defining the antecedents of experience co-creation by considering different research perspectives that can enhance service design research.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2012

Matthias Jahn, Claudia Piesche and Stefan Jablonski

Today's requirements concerning successful learning support comprise a variety of application scenarios. Therefore, the development of supporting software preferably aims…

Abstract

Purpose

Today's requirements concerning successful learning support comprise a variety of application scenarios. Therefore, the development of supporting software preferably aims at modular design. This article discusses requirements regarding flexibility of e‐learning systems and presents important principles, which should be met by successful systems. The purpose of this paper is to achieve a highly flexible system as follows: first of all, the system itself should be capable of easily being integrated into other systems. Second, the approach should allow easy integration of new components, respectively, existing resources without the need to adapt the whole system.

Design/methodology/approach

Guided by the results of previous projects and by various experiences in online education the importance of modular structures of an effective architecture as well as for the system usage were discovered. Accordingly, existing e‐learning systems were examined and some deficiency regarding support of synchronous learning activities were found.

Findings

The architecture of the Meeting Room Platform (MRP) is introduced as an example implementation of synchronous communication and collaboration systems. In addition to fulfilling explained flexibility requirements, it is configurable in a way so that the user can choose a set of services he wants to provide in online meetings.

Originality/value

With aforementioned aspects of flexibility in mind, the concept of the MRP system differs from existing systems and constitutes a new approach in designing synchronous e‐learning environments. Finally, various use cases as described in this article show the benefit of this approach more detailed.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Sylva Girtelschmid, Matthias Steinbauer, Vikash Kumar, Anna Fensel and Gabriele Kotsis

The purpose of this article is to propose and evaluate a novel system architecture for Smart City applications which uses ontology reasoning and a distributed stream…

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1709

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to propose and evaluate a novel system architecture for Smart City applications which uses ontology reasoning and a distributed stream processing framework on the cloud. In the domain of Smart City, often methodologies of semantic modeling and automated inference are applied. However, semantic models often face performance problems when applied in large scale.

Design/methodology/approach

The problem domain is addressed by using methods from Big Data processing in combination with semantic models. The architecture is designed in a way that for the Smart City model still traditional semantic models and rule engines can be used. However, sensor data occurring at such Smart Cities are pre-processed by a Big Data streaming platform to lower the workload to be processed by the rule engine.

Findings

By creating a real-world implementation of the proposed architecture and running simulations of Smart Cities of different sizes, on top of this implementation, the authors found that the combination of Big Data streaming platforms with semantic reasoning is a valid approach to the problem.

Research limitations/implications

In this article, real-world sensor data from only two buildings were extrapolated for the simulations. Obviously, real-world scenarios will have a more complex set of sensor input values, which needs to be addressed in future work.

Originality/value

The simulations show that merely using a streaming platform as a buffer for sensor input values already increases the sensor data throughput and that by applying intelligent filtering in the streaming platform, the actual number of rule executions can be limited to a minimum.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2012

Matthias Inauen and Andrea Schenker‐Wicki

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of inside‐out open innovation (as opposed to closed innovation) on firm innovation performance. Inside‐out open…

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12514

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of inside‐out open innovation (as opposed to closed innovation) on firm innovation performance. Inside‐out open innovation involves the exploitation of existing internal technologies through innovation and commercialization.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses are tested empirically using survey data collected from stock‐listed companies in Germany, Switzerland and Austria. The data include the complete responses from 141 R&D managers for the period from 2004 to 2008.

Findings

The results reveal that companies that emphasize inside‐out open innovation are more likely to create radical innovations and tend to sell a greater number of new products. Companies pursuing closed innovation are more likely to exhibit a higher incremental product innovation performance.

Research limitations/implications

The cross‐sectional data approach and its dependency on the perceptions and experiences of the respondents has its limitations. Future research should extend the focus and concept of this study and explore additional closed and open innovation strategies.

Originality/value

The adoption of open innovation in practice has not been examined in depth. This study provides empirical insights into the open innovation approaches in German‐speaking countries and, by drawing important conclusions and implications for managers involved in the R&D processes, fills a gap in the innovation management literature.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2019

Pilar Madrazo-Lemarroy, Karla Barajas-Portas and Maria Elena Labastida Tovar

The purpose of this paper is to probe how reward-based crowdfunding campaigns accomplish their goal by adopting the theoretical constructs of social capital dimensions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to probe how reward-based crowdfunding campaigns accomplish their goal by adopting the theoretical constructs of social capital dimensions: structural, cognitive and relational.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach used is a design model for concluded campaigns in a Mexican crowdfunding platform, which determines social capital from operating social networks (Facebook and Twitter). By using this model, the associations between the dimensions are revealed, verifying how social capital flourishes during the campaign and how it alters the campaign’s outcome.

Findings

The findings demonstrate how social interaction through a wide social network (structural dimension), shared vision and values among entrepreneurs and their potential funders (cognitive dimension), and the development of trustworthiness within the campaign (relational dimension) boost the probability of achieving the crowdfunding goal.

Research limitations/implications

The results inform researchers on how social capital is forged from social networks during a crowdfunding campaign. However, the method must be validated with other crowdfunding models and other social network platforms commonly used by campaign creators.

Practical implications

Contributions from this paper include tools (design model and evaluation method) associating theory with the crowdfunding mechanism, complementing previous work. Crowdfunding providers, as well as campaign creators, have now an approach to appraise social capital and obtain the desired goal.

Originality/value

In addition to providing much-needed research on the current state of crowdfunding, this paper analyzes the link between practice and theory, which can be valuable in confining the mechanism to an accurate theory and ensuring the theory’s longevity.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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