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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2012

Matthew S. Crow, Chang‐Bae Lee and Jae‐Jin Joo

In spite of the importance of officers' perception of organizational justice and its influence on organizational commitment, the policing literature lacks information…

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Abstract

Purpose

In spite of the importance of officers' perception of organizational justice and its influence on organizational commitment, the policing literature lacks information about the relationship between the factors. Using job satisfaction as a mediator, this study aims to examine an indirect influence of organizational justice on police officers' commitment to their organization.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed a survey of 418 police officers in South Korea while on in‐service training. In exploring the complex relationship among organizational justice (i.e. distributive, procedural, and interactional), job satisfaction, and organizational commitment, the researchers utilized structural equation modeling to overcome the weaknesses of linear regression models.

Findings

Officers' perception of organizational justice was positively related with their level of organizational commitment. In addition, perception of procedural and interactional justice had an indirect impact on the officers' organizational commitment through distributive justice. Lastly, perception of organizational justice showed an indirect influence on organizational commitment through job satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

Due to its cross‐sectional design, the findings do not confirm any causal relationship among the variables. In addition, the current study used a purposive sample of police officers in South Korea, which may limit the generalizability of the findings.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by examining organizational commitment in light of officers' perception of organizational justice and job satisfaction using structural equation modeling to explore the complex relationship among the organizational factors.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Matthew S. Crow, Tara O'Connor Shelley, Laura E. Bedard and Marc Gertz

Following the velvet revolution of 1989 and the adoption of a democratic form of government, Czech policing has experienced a plethora of changes resulting in a new police…

Abstract

Following the velvet revolution of 1989 and the adoption of a democratic form of government, Czech policing has experienced a plethora of changes resulting in a new police force that has been understudied to date. This research seeks to address this void using an exploratory approach that utilizes survey research to gauge the attitudes of 70 Czech police officers regarding crime and criminal justice policies; police and government involvement in social and order maintenance problems; and police practices in the Czech Republic (e.g. community‐oriented policing). Several factors – historical, ideology and job tenure – are considered as potential explanations for observed trends in officer attitudes. The results indicate that there are no clear patterns to these officers' attitudes.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Native American Bilingual Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-477-4

Abstract

Details

Native American Bilingual Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-477-4

Abstract

Details

Native American Bilingual Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-477-4

Book part
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Imani Perry

In this article Professor Perry argues that Plessy v. Ferguson and the de jure segregation it heralded has overdetermined the discourse on Jim Crow. She demonstrates…

Abstract

In this article Professor Perry argues that Plessy v. Ferguson and the de jure segregation it heralded has overdetermined the discourse on Jim Crow. She demonstrates through a historical analysis of activist movements, popular literature, and case law that private law, specifically property and contract, were significant aspects of Jim Crow law and culture. The failure to understand the significance of private law has limited the breadth of juridical analyses of how to respond to racial divisions and injustices. Perry therefore contends that a paradigmatic shift is necessary in scholarly analyses of the Jim Crow era, to include private law, and moreover that this shift will enrich our understandings of both historic and current inequalities.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-109-5

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 6 November 2020

Cheryl K. Crawley

Abstract

Details

Native American Bilingual Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-477-4

Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2009

Raymond Gavins

Black slavery and white racism in the South and the nation, de jure and de facto Jim Crow, Brown v. Board of Education (1954), which outlawed separate schools, “massive…

Abstract

Black slavery and white racism in the South and the nation, de jure and de facto Jim Crow, Brown v. Board of Education (1954), which outlawed separate schools, “massive resistance” to it (Klarman, 1994, p. 82), plus racial disparities in educational achievement since 1954, all frame this narrative of black males' quest for higher education. Bondmen were denied literacy and black freemen rarely attended school, much less pursue advanced study, during the antebellum period. Union victory in the Civil War, abolition of slavery with the Thirteenth Amendment (1865), and Reconstruction marked the rise of not only Negro schools and colleges but also southern share cropping, called “the new slavery” (Du Bois, 1935, p. 715), and epidemic violence against blacks that imposed their disfranchisement and segregation, by laws and customs, until the 1960s. Thus African American males sought collegiate and professional training in a national milieu of white supremacy, which postulated black men's mental and moral inferiority but ignored their widespread poverty, separation, and unequal opportunities. Confined in historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), they breached the color-line little by little at white institutions, thereby paving the way for Brown, the civil rights movement, and desegregation. In the second half of the 20th century, HBCUs and the majority-white institutions trained increasing numbers of black male graduates and professionals. By 1980 though, only some 11 percent of young black men had received 4 years of college compared to 25.5 percent of young white men (Jaynes & Williams, 1989). An “achievement gap” was evident and it persists today (Lee, 2002, p. 3), revealing the deep roots of race and class inequality in America. White racism, its legal and extralegal forms, and black aspirations and efforts underlay and continue to fuel black men's drive for higher learning. Over time black men, and certainly women as well, faced racist structures, ideologies, and attitudes born of slavery; sub-citizenship, stereotypes, and terror, among other barriers, through a century of Jim Crow; and after Brown, ongoing discrimination, socioeconomic disadvantages, and ambiguous “affirmative action” policies (Jaynes & Williams, 1989, p. 376).

Details

Black American Males in Higher Education: Diminishing Proportions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-899-1

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Gary M. Crow

This paper aims to contribute to the literature and practice on beginning principal socialization by identifying the features of post‐industrial work that create a more…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to contribute to the literature and practice on beginning principal socialization by identifying the features of post‐industrial work that create a more complex work environment for the practice and learning of the principalship in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on recent literature on the changing nature of work, the paper applies those features of complexity to components of beginning principal socialization.

Findings

The nature of work in post‐industrial society and the changes in education, including a knowledge society, technology, demographic changes, and public accountability increase the complexity for US school principals. These features provide an important conceptual and normative basis for understanding and changing the content, sources, methods, and outcomes of beginning principal socialization.

Originality/value

The paper contributes a set of conceptual and normative features that strengthens the understanding of how beginning principals learn the role.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 44 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Death, Memorialization and Deviant Spaces
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-574-6

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