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Book part
Publication date: 24 November 2016

Liliana Rodriguez-Arango and Maria Alejandra Gonzalez-Perez

This chapter aims to provide a descriptive analysis and a theoretical interpretation of the challenges for international expansion of four large multinationals of each of…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter aims to provide a descriptive analysis and a theoretical interpretation of the challenges for international expansion of four large multinationals of each of the BRIC countries (JBS from Brazil, VimpelCom from Russia, Tata Motors from India, and Lenovo from China).

Methodology/approach

This study employs a qualitative approach, following a multiple-case study methodology, by analyzing four prominent cases of the internationalization of BRIC multinationals.

Findings

The internationalization process of the studied BRIC multinationals was influenced by the type of inputs and resources that each company had in their home country and the search for needed resources in other firms abroad that may have helped them to complement their business assets. The international expansion of these firms have been characterized by overcoming of several obstacles through the possession of firm-specific advantages, mainly composed of managerial capabilities, expertise, and knowledge about the markets and their companies.

Details

The Challenge of Bric Multinationals
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-350-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

Andrew Howard and Matthew Joint

Analyses some of the reasons for fatigue and stress among drivers.Contributors to fatigue can be the distance travelled, or sleepingdisorders. Contributors to driver…

Abstract

Analyses some of the reasons for fatigue and stress among drivers. Contributors to fatigue can be the distance travelled, or sleeping disorders. Contributors to driver stress can include worry and emotional stress, related to work or to life events; or road rage. Identifies ways in which stress, fatigue and road rage can be reduced or avoided. Provides advice for fleet managers on making driving safer.

Details

Employee Councelling Today, vol. 6 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-8217

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2011

Judith Keene and Roger Fairman

The purpose of this paper is to describe the need to integrate staff from a number of services from the public and academic sectors who will be working together in a new…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the need to integrate staff from a number of services from the public and academic sectors who will be working together in a new joint‐use library. Staff workshops aimed at producing agreed core values were used as a way of starting the process of integration and engaging all staff with the vision of the new library.

Design/methodology/approach

The decision to focus on core values and to actively involve staff in their development is explained with reference to other work on vision and values. The format of the workshops is described, and an overview given of the qualitative and quantitative feedback from staff at the workshops, which was used to assess the success of the approach and inform future work, which is briefly outlined.

Findings

The paper concludes that the workshops were successful in helping staff start to get to know about each other's services and develop joint values. The opportunity to participate and be consulted by managers was welcomed.

Practical implications

Practical workshops can be an effective way of bringing together staff from different services and organisations and start engaging them with a vision. The authors intend to continue the process by working to embed the values and providing more of these opportunities for their staff, looking next at training needs.

Originality/value

Merging staff from different services can be difficult and threaten the success of joint‐use libraries. As partnership work is increasingly promoted amongst libraries, this case study suggests one effective way of encouraging integration.

Details

Library Review, vol. 60 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2003

John Hague

This article outlines how Centrica, with a workforce of 40,000 people, approached a project to build a technical competence framework for the managers of Centrica’s group…

Abstract

This article outlines how Centrica, with a workforce of 40,000 people, approached a project to build a technical competence framework for the managers of Centrica’s group financial operation in 2001. Development took six months and 600 employees were involved. As well as John Matchett Limited which provided the system, consultants Moloney and Gealy were used in the later stage of development to refine the competence headings, descriptors and language into its present form. At first there were problems with the online systems but Centrica’s IT systems were modified and the problems were overcome. The system is constantly being improved, particularly in the links to learning and development opportunities, and the use of technical competences will be strengthened in initial recruitment to group finance vacancies. The whole competency concept has taken off at Centrica and, taking their lead from group finance, the marketing, legal and HR functions are all putting their own frameworks in place.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Abstract

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

R.F. Baskerville

Abstract

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2019

Alice S. Fisher, Douglas K. Yatter, Douglas N. Greenburg, William R. Baker III, Benjamin A. Dozier and Robyn J. Greenberg

This paper aims to analyze the March 6, 2019 enforcement advisory in which the Division of Enforcement (Division) of the US Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC or…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze the March 6, 2019 enforcement advisory in which the Division of Enforcement (Division) of the US Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC or Commission) announced that it will work alongside the US Department of Justice (DOJ) and other agencies to investigate foreign bribery and corruption relating to commodities markets.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explains the enforcement advisory and outlines key considerations for industry participants and their compliance teams, including the CFTC’s plan to investigate in parallel with other enforcement authorities, an expansion of the CFTC’s existing self-reporting, cooperation and remediation policy to address foreign corruption and the CFTC’s focus on market and economic integrity, and provides guidelines for commodities companies concerning anti-corruption compliance and training programs, investigating potential incidents of bribery and corruption, reporting obligations under the Commodity Exchange Act (CEA) and CFTC regulations, voluntary reporting of incidents of foreign corruption and whistleblowing.

Findings

The CFTC announcement adds a new dimension to an already crowded and complex landscape for anti-corruption enforcement. A range of industries, including energy, agriculture, metals, financial services, cryptocurrencies and beyond, must now consider the CFTC and the CEA when assessing global compliance and enforcement risks relating to bribery and corruption.

Originality/value

Expert guidance from lawyers with broad experience in white collar defense, investigations, financial services, securities, commodities, energy and derivatives.

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1976

The Howard Shuttering Contractors case throws considerable light on the importance which the tribunals attach to warnings before dismissing an employee. In this case the…

Abstract

The Howard Shuttering Contractors case throws considerable light on the importance which the tribunals attach to warnings before dismissing an employee. In this case the tribunal took great pains to interpret the intention of the parties to the different site agreements, and it came to the conclusion that the agreed procedure was not followed. One other matter, which must be particularly noted by employers, is that where a final warning is required, this final warning must be “a warning”, and not the actual dismissal. So that where, for example, three warnings are to be given, the third must be a “warning”. It is after the employee has misconducted himself thereafter that the employer may dismiss.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2019

Matthew James Kerry and Justin A. DeSimone

The purpose of this paper is to reexamine exploration-exploitation’s reciprocality in organizational ambidexterity (OA) research. OA figures prominently in a variety of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reexamine exploration-exploitation’s reciprocality in organizational ambidexterity (OA) research. OA figures prominently in a variety of organization science phenomena. Introduced as a two-stage model for innovation, theory specifies reciprocal reinforcement between the OA processes of exploration (eR) and exploitation (eT). In this study, the authors argue that previous analyses of OA necessarily neglect this reciprocality in favor of conceptualizations that conform to common statistical techniques.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors propose joint-variance (JV) as a soluble estimator of exploration–exploitation (eR-eT) reciprocality. An updated systematic literature synthesis yielded K = 50 studies (53 independent samples, N = 11,743) for further testing.

Findings

Three primary findings are as follows: JV reduced negative confounding, explaining 45 per cent of between-study variance. JV quantified the positive confounding in separate meta-analytic estimates of eR and eT on performance because of double-counting (37.6 per cent), and substantive application of JV to hypothesis testing supported OA theoretical predictions.

Research limitations/implications

The authors discuss practical consideration for eR-eT reciprocality, as well as theoretical contributions for cohering the OA empirical literature.

Practical implications

The authors discuss design limitations and JV measurement extensions for the future.

Social implications

Learning in OA literature has been neglected or underestimated.

Originality/value

Because reciprocality is theorized, yet absent in current models, existing results represent confounded or biased evidence of the OA’s effect on firm performance. Subsequently, the authors propose JV as a soluble estimator of eR-eT learning modes.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2021

Deborah E. Swain and Patrick Roughen

This paper aims to describe how knowledge management (KM) in planning can support the sustainability of innovation in a hybrid, joint-use facility. The case study research…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe how knowledge management (KM) in planning can support the sustainability of innovation in a hybrid, joint-use facility. The case study research studies ImaginOn, a 15 year-old children’s library and theater for young people in Charlotte, NC.

Design/methodology/approach

This research used KM model analysis of qualitative data about tacit-explicit knowledge, intellectual capital (IC) and cognitive modes of collaboration. Both historic documents and primary data (from field study observations, interviews and a questionnaire) were analyzed for informal KM practices. Semi-structured and unstructured interview questions about innovation were used.

Findings

This study found evidence of tacit knowledge sharing, the growth of IC and the operationalization of collaboration to promote innovation. Although traditional KM terms were not used by staff, an integrated model framework demonstrates how KM practices promote innovation in planning joint-use facilities.

Practical implications

Although a study of a diverse cultural collaboration rather than two libraries, the KM practices that supported innovation and collaboration in this hybrid, joint-use facility might be applied to libraries. Future KM model research on joint-use organizations could investigate merged businesses, government programs and non-profits.

Social implications

The library and theater institutions in ImaginOn impact the lives of children and parents in meaningful ways that support community understanding, art, diversity and social interaction.

Originality/value

Research on joint-use libraries began in the 1960s. This case study provides unique model analysis of KM practices in a hybrid, joint-use facility (a library and theater). The innovative success and sustainability of ImaginOn illustrates the application of KM for strategic planning and aligning IC and business assets.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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