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Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2012

Matthew J. Taylor, Chammie C. Austin, Jacob D. Perkins and Jason L. Edwards

Purpose – For many African American college students, the pursuit of a college education has both rewards and risks. Oftentimes, African American students are faced with…

Abstract

Purpose – For many African American college students, the pursuit of a college education has both rewards and risks. Oftentimes, African American students are faced with the decision to leave the comforts of their home communities in order to realize the American dream through the mechanism of higher education. The majority attend predominately White institutions (PWIs) where successful negotiation of this process not only has academic consequences, but psychological and cultural consequences as well. This chapter examines the psychological and phenomenological experience of African American students at PWIs of higher education.

Design/methodology/approach – The present day manifestation of historical and sociopolitical foundations of exclusion, racism, and discrimination in higher education are explored. There is a focus on how these latter themes relate to “campus culture” and institutions, with implications for psychological coping and educational success. Conclusions also focus on ways to begin to bring about change in this culture.

Findings – The successful negotiation of the collegiate environment, ultimately leading to the awarding of one's degree requires more than just passing classes; matriculation and retention in college also involves engaging one's social and cultural environment as well, particularly outside of the classroom.

Originality/value – As discussions of multiculturalism and inclusiveness in higher education find themselves anchored to abstract and theoretical conceptualization, or linked to an approach which focuses on “numbers” and “percentages” among student bodies, both of these approaches provide little indication that we are ultimately talking about the lived experiences of real people.

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Health Disparities Among Under-served Populations: Implications for Research, Policy and Praxis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-103-8

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Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2012

Abstract

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Health Disparities Among Under-served Populations: Implications for Research, Policy and Praxis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-103-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1976

The Howard Shuttering Contractors case throws considerable light on the importance which the tribunals attach to warnings before dismissing an employee. In this case the…

Abstract

The Howard Shuttering Contractors case throws considerable light on the importance which the tribunals attach to warnings before dismissing an employee. In this case the tribunal took great pains to interpret the intention of the parties to the different site agreements, and it came to the conclusion that the agreed procedure was not followed. One other matter, which must be particularly noted by employers, is that where a final warning is required, this final warning must be “a warning”, and not the actual dismissal. So that where, for example, three warnings are to be given, the third must be a “warning”. It is after the employee has misconducted himself thereafter that the employer may dismiss.

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Managerial Law, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Christopher P. Neck and Arthur G. Bedeian

In an effort to give credit where credit is due, recounts J. Maunsell White III’s role in the development of the Taylor‐White process for treating tool steel. A…

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In an effort to give credit where credit is due, recounts J. Maunsell White III’s role in the development of the Taylor‐White process for treating tool steel. A contemporary and colleague of Frederick W. Taylor, “The Father of Scientific Management”, White offers a classic example of the so‐called Matthew Effect, in which recognition accrues to those of considerable repute and is withheld from those who have not yet made their mark.

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Journal of Management History, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-252X

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

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The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Rashmi Singh and Jogendra Kumar Nayak

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of self-esteem in the relationship between parent-adolescent relationship and adolescent compulsive buying…

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1531

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of self-esteem in the relationship between parent-adolescent relationship and adolescent compulsive buying behaviour. Using a sample of 300 adolescents (15-18 years) in India and the structural equation modelling technique, the findings reveal that self-esteem mediates the relationship between parent-adolescent relationship and adolescent compulsive buying behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study is the first to experimentally manipulate important parent-adolescent relationship and measures its impact on compulsive buying among a sample of 15-18-year old adolescents. Next, the authors investigate the mediating role of self-esteem for the above relationship. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling have been used in the study.

Findings

The study also establishes that familial conflict and cohesion acts as major sources of adolescent compulsivity. The authors have also examined the mediating role of self-esteem on the above relationships and found that adolescents’ compulsivity varies with the level of self-esteem (i.e. higher level of self-esteem leads to lower levels of adolescents’ compulsivity). The practical and theoretical implications are discussed within the context of adolescents’ compulsivity.

Originality/value

The study makes some inimitable and significant contributions to the literature. It portrays one of few studies to investigate compulsive buying during adolescence period – a hard to reach population. Here authors experimentally manipulate parent-adolescent relationship to investigate its impact on compulsive buying. The study’s findings in regard to mediating effect of self-esteem on the parent-adolescent relationship and adolescents’ compulsive buying behaviour suggest that compulsive buying begins during adolescence period and is a common coping strategy for both boys and girls.

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Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Book part
Publication date: 1 September 2014

Wolfgang G. Scherl

This chapter introduces a new theoretical framework for developing emotion-related abilities according to the emotional intelligence (EI) construct definition of Mayer…

Abstract

This chapter introduces a new theoretical framework for developing emotion-related abilities according to the emotional intelligence (EI) construct definition of Mayer, Salovey, and Caruso (2006). The awareness, reflection, and management (ARM) model has been devised and demonstrates a triadic cycle of emotional ARM relating to affect, cognition, and behavior. The ARM model constitutes an approach to nurture emotion-related abilities (ability EI) and responds to criticism raised by Zeidner, Matthews, and Roberts (2009). The ARM Theory was corroborated by both learning theory and schools of counselling (SOC). The potential to develop emotion-related abilities in emotional awareness, reflection and reasoning, coping and management is discussed.

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Individual Sources, Dynamics, and Expressions of Emotion
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-889-1

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Book part
Publication date: 30 December 2004

Fred H. Previc

Human performance, particularly that of the warfighter, has been the subject of a large amount of research during the past few decades. For example, in the Medline

Abstract

Human performance, particularly that of the warfighter, has been the subject of a large amount of research during the past few decades. For example, in the Medline database of medical and psychological research, 1,061 papers had been published on the topic of “military performance” as of October 2003. Because warfighters are often pushed to physiological and mental extremes, a study of their performance provides a unique glimpse of the interplay of a wide variety of intrinsic and extrinsic factors on the functioning of the human brain and body. Unfortunately, it has proven very difficult to build performance models that can adequately incorporate the myriad of physiological, medical, social, and cognitive factors that influence behavior in extreme conditions. The chief purpose of this chapter is to provide a neurobiological (neurochemical) framework for building and integrating warfighter performance models in the physiological, medical, social, and cognitive areas. This framework should be relevant to all other professionals who routinely operate in extreme environments. The secondary purpose of this chapter is to recommend various performance metrics that can be linked to specific neurochemical states and can accordingly strengthen and extend the scope of the neurochemical model.

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The Science and Simulation of Human Performance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-296-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Carolyn MacCann, Gerald Matthews, Moshe Zeidner and Richard D. Roberts

This article provides a review and conceptual comparison between self‐report and performance‐based measures of emotional intelligence. Analyses of reliability…

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This article provides a review and conceptual comparison between self‐report and performance‐based measures of emotional intelligence. Analyses of reliability, psychometric properties, and various forms of validity lead to the conclusion that self‐report techniques measure a dispositional construct, that may have some predictive validity, but which is highly correlated with personality and independent of intelligence. Although seemingly more valid, performance‐based measures have certain limitations, especially when scored with reference to consensual norms, which leads to problems of skew and restriction of range. Scaling procedures may partially ameliorate these scoring weaknesses. Alternative approaches to scoring, such as expert judgement, also suffer problems since the nature of the requisite expertise is unclear. Use of experimental paradigms for studying individual differences in information‐processing may, however, inform expertise. Other difficulties for performance‐based measures include limited predictive and operational validity, restricting practical utility in organizational settings. Further research appears necessary before tests of E1 are suitable for making real‐life decisions about individuals.

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The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

Chuck Wrege

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539

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Journal of Management History, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-252X

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