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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2013

John Blake and Matthew Hardy

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact on customer service of amalgamating two production/distribution facilities in a blood distribution network, located in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact on customer service of amalgamating two production/distribution facilities in a blood distribution network, located in the Maritime region of Canada, into a single production facility and a satellite distribution facility.

Design/methodology/approach

Simulation models of the existing distribution network and the future distribution network were built. Experiments were conducted, using the two models, to compare the performance of each.

Findings

Results indicate that there is no evidence to suggest a decrease in customer service resulting from the consolidation of the two facilities. Furthermore, results indicate that this conclusion is robust with respect to lower inventory levels at the satellite and up to three road closures per annum.

Research limitations/implications

The results are based on specific operational assumptions regarding the number of hospitals supplied by the satellite facility and the methods used to transport blood products between locations.

Social implications

The results of this study have important implications for how vital blood products are distributed to patients in the Maritime provinces of Canada.

Originality/value

This paper is a case study describing a unique application of simulation methods to an important area of application. It will be of interest to readers interested in the management of blood supply chains and to researchers applying simulation methods.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 26 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 14 May 2003

Jonathan L Gifford

Abstract

Details

Flexible Urban Transportation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-050656-2

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Abstract

Details

Flexible Urban Transportation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-050656-2

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2020

Susan Lilico Kinnear

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the internal historical forces that shaped national identity in New Zealand and how state-sponsored ideographs and cultural…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the internal historical forces that shaped national identity in New Zealand and how state-sponsored ideographs and cultural narratives, played out in nation branding, government–public relations activity, film and the literature, contributed to the rise of present days’ racism and hostility towards non-Pakeha constructions of New Zealand’s self-imagining.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes a cultural materialist approach, coupled with postcolonial perspectives, to build an empirical framework to analyse specific historical texts and artefacts that were supported and promoted by the New Zealand Government at the point of decolonisation. Traditional constructions of cultural nationalism, communicated through state-sponsored advertising, public information films and national literature, are challenged and re-evaluated in the context of race, gender and socio-economic status.

Findings

A total of three major groupings or themes were identified: crew, core and counterdiscourse cultures that each projected a different construction of New Zealand’s national identity. These interwoven themes produced a wider interpretation of identity than traditional cultural nationalist constructions allowed, still contributing to exclusionary formations of identity that alienated non-Pakeha New Zealanders and encouraged racism and intolerance.

Research limitations/implications

The research study is empirical in nature and belongs to a larger project looking at a range of Pakeha constructions of identity. The article itself does not therefore fully consider Maori constructions of New Zealand’s identity.

Originality/value

The focus on combining cultural materialism, postcolonial approaches to analysis and counterdiscourse in order to analyse historical national narrative provides a unique perspective on the forces that contribute to racism and intolerance in New Zealand’s society. The framework developed can be used to evaluate the historical government communications activity and to better understand how nation branding leads to the exclusion of minority communities.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1913

BOURNEMOUTH lies in one of the most beautiful parts of South‐west England; and all the world knows how this region has been immortalised by Thomas Hardy, who by his…

Abstract

BOURNEMOUTH lies in one of the most beautiful parts of South‐west England; and all the world knows how this region has been immortalised by Thomas Hardy, who by his romances and poems has introduced to the public of England and America the ancient land of Wessex.

Details

New Library World, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Logan M. Steele, Tristan McIntosh, Tyler J. Mulhearn, Logan L. Watts, Heather J. Anderson, Desiree Hill, Li Lin, Samuel H. Matthews, Alisha M. Ness and M. Ronald Buckley

This paper aims to provide a review of the reinstitution of the Journal of Management History (JMH) following its five-year merger with Management Decision. In this…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a review of the reinstitution of the Journal of Management History (JMH) following its five-year merger with Management Decision. In this review, the final issue of the merger in 2005 is examined through the four volumes of JMH that were published after the separation. Across this time period, trends in topics and approaches, as well as identify particularly impactful work, were investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

With a taxonomy developed in a previous review of JMH (Hardy et al., 2015), articles were sorted by independent raters for the following dimensions: focus (i.e. person, topic or event), historical approach (i.e. an account or analysis) and readership (i.e. public policy or management). After full consensus was reached, these categories were examined to identify themes and shifts in trends over the target time period. Finally, the impact of articles published between 2005 and 2009 was evaluated by using citations provided by Google Scholar.

Findings

In the years following the separation of JMH from Management Decision, a few notable shifts were observed in the journal’s focus, approach and readership. This time period was first characterized by a heavy emphasis on topic-based articles. The emphasis subsequently shifted to strike a balance between focusing on people and topics. There was also fairly balanced use of historical analysis and historical account approaches. The final shift led to a majority of articles having a person-based focus. Interestingly, the largest impacts were made all by articles with a focus on particular management topic.

Originality/value

This quantitative review provides insight into the development of JMH following its reestablishment as independent publication outlet.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2011

Daniel Ashton

The aim of this paper is to present qualitative research with higher education games design students to explore situated understandings of work and the negotiation of…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to present qualitative research with higher education games design students to explore situated understandings of work and the negotiation of “work” and “non‐work” boundaries.

Design/methodology/approach

Situated understandings of work are examined through interviews and focus groups with games design students in the UK and contextualised with interviews with games industry professionals and attendance at industry careers events. The theoretical approach of “occupational devotion” is used to explore work practices and motivations, and “technological action” is then used to draw out the significance of relations with games technologies in this negotiation.

Findings

The main finding concerns the continued significance of a fixed field of “work” for students intending to progress from education into “work”. The importance of “work” was identified in how students positioned themselves (occupational devotion) and engaged with games technologies (technological action). This is contrasted with the emphasis on co‐creative relations and broadbrush assertions of blurring boundaries between work and non‐work.

Research limitations/implications

A larger sample of students that ranged across different digital gaming disciplines within higher education (programming; art) would add breadth and further perspectives. Further research would connect student perceptions of the games industry, from attending events such as careers fairs, and the industry promotional discourses and representational strategies. A longitudinal study would be valuable for tracing changes in recruitment strategies and industry and education intersections.

Practical implications

The paper provides insights into how higher education students engage with the games industry and articulates their personal development and employability attributes.

Originality/value

This paper makes a case for research with students as a means to explore boundaries of “work” and “non‐work”. It questions the blurring of “work” and “non‐work”, and provides conceptual pointers, combined with empirical research, that indicate the continued purchase of fixed notions of “work” for workers‐in‐the‐making. This is relevant for scholarly research into the sociology of work, higher education pedagogy, and industry‐education relations.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

James J. Kirk, Bridget Downey, Steve Duckett and Connie Woody

The first section of the article provides readers with an overview of the most widely used career development interventions including alternative career paths, assessment…

Abstract

The first section of the article provides readers with an overview of the most widely used career development interventions including alternative career paths, assessment centers, career coaching/counseling, cross‐training, flexitime, job enlargement, job enrichment, job rotation, job sharing, phased retirement, sabbaticals, and temporary assignments. Each intervention is described and accompanied with an example. The second section of the article presents three case studies: When woodworkers won’t; How do we keep going from here? and Opportunity in scarce resources. Each case is accompanied with a series of discussion questions and answers. Managers, trainers, and/or consultants can use the article and its case studies to facilitate discussions among employees regarding the potential benefits and drawbacks of various career development interventions.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Chad S. Seifried

The aim of this paper is to explore the development of the North American Society for Sport Management (NASSM) and to map the foundation that specific individuals…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to explore the development of the North American Society for Sport Management (NASSM) and to map the foundation that specific individuals, historical works, and historians provided the founders of that organization and the field of sport management in general. The paper also aims to track the early beginnings of sport management and present sport as a viable area for business and management historians to conduct their research and discuss theory.

Design/methodology/approach

Following the initial work started by deWilde et al., this study drew on a wide range of primary and secondary sources and took an antiquarian and reconstructionist approach. Specifically, time-specific sport-related/focused dissertations, research articles, and archives from NASSM, along with published books and archives, were used to work toward the purpose of the study.

Findings

This paper illustrates that some of the critical founding members of sport management and NASSM drew upon the training of historians, with special emphasis from business history, and reacted to specific prompts to create the field (i.e. sport management). “History” and trained historians directly impacted the field of sport management by helping to establish NASSM, the Journal of Sport Management, and graduate study programs, in addition to fashioning the first field accreditation standards and seminal textbooks needed to educate the generalist or specialist sport management student.

Research limitations/implications

This research only tracks the beginnings of sport management and focuses on the contribution of “history” toward its development. This work recognizes there were other influences that were critical to the development of sport management.

Practical implications

Over time, sport management scholars have moved away from their small historical base and more toward true quantitative preferences. While this has helped the field gain some respectability within contemporary preferences, the re-utilization of historical methods and/or perspectives can help serve the future of sport management and business/management history research toward the study of emerging topics. Through collaboration sport management's leadership can realize the potential of the historical approach/orientation and management historians can enjoy another outlet to communicate their thoughts regarding management topics and theories.

Originality/value

The paper highlights that sport is rich in context and available to use for the study of management theory and behaviors.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2010

Kay Whitehead and Kay Morris Matthews

In this article we focus on two women, Catherine Francis (1836‐1916) and Dorothy Dolling (1897‐ 1967), whose lives traversed England, New Zealand and South Australia. At…

Abstract

In this article we focus on two women, Catherine Francis (1836‐1916) and Dorothy Dolling (1897‐ 1967), whose lives traversed England, New Zealand and South Australia. At the beginning of this period the British Empire was expanding and New Zealand and South Australia had much in common. They were white settler societies, that is ‘forms of colonial society which had displaced indigenous peoples from their land’. We have organised the article chronologically so the first section commences with Catherine’s birth in England and early life in South Australia, where she mostly inhabited the world of the young ladies school, a transnational phenomenon. The next section investigates her career in New Zealand from 1878 where she led the Mount Cook Infant’s School in Wellington and became one of the colony’s first renowned women principals. We turn to Dorothy Dolling in the third section, describing her childhood and work as a university student and tutor in New Zealand and England. The final section of our article focuses on the ways in which both women have been represented in the national memories of Australia and New Zealand. In so doing, we show that understandings about nationhood are also transnational, and that writing about Francis and Dolling reflects the shifting relationships between the three countries in the twentieth century.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

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