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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Matthew John Gill and Samantha Brookes

The purpose of this paper is to develop a psychological outcome tool which reflects the relationship between clusters of items on the Short Term Assessment of Risk and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a psychological outcome tool which reflects the relationship between clusters of items on the Short Term Assessment of Risk and Treatability (START) risk assessment and different categories of psychological progress in male inpatient psychiatric services.

Design/methodology/approach

A principal component analysis (PCA) was conducted on data from 135 male psychiatric rehabilitation patients’ START risk assessments.

Findings

PCA identified four strength psychology quadrants which were explained by a five-factor structure and four vulnerability quadrants which were explained by a four-factor structure. The development of the psychology quadrant, its usefulness in establishing a treatment pathway and areas of future research are also discussed.

Originality/value

Developing accessible, transparent outcome measures using evidence-based practice is highly relevant within the field of mental health rehabilitation.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

R.F. Baskerville

234

Abstract

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2008

Matthew Gill

This study approaches corporate sponsorship of sport as identification rhetoric to further understand the relationship created between consumers and corporate sponsors…

Abstract

This study approaches corporate sponsorship of sport as identification rhetoric to further understand the relationship created between consumers and corporate sponsors. The focus is on the corporate sponsorship of the NASCAR (National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing) Sprint Cup Series, examining how sponsorship messages utilise identification tactics. The study finds that messages rhetorically create identification through common ground and unifying symbol strategies between the sponsor and sponsored activity, and between the sponsor and consumer.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 November 2010

Susan Wild

304

Abstract

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

Article
Publication date: 15 March 2013

Gill Coleman

The purpose of this paper is to report and reflect on a decade‐long action experiment to devise a form of business education for sustainability that helps managers act as…

935

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report and reflect on a decade‐long action experiment to devise a form of business education for sustainability that helps managers act as “pro‐sustainability” agents of change. It offers one example of practice in this evolving field, for scholarly scrutiny and discussion.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on action research principles, which engage theory with practice, and action with reflection. It is written as a reflective account of the author's experience.

Findings

This educational programme for managers locates itself as a form of business education for sustainability whilst simultaneously acknowledging that the managerialist assumptions underpinning this aspiration are part of the problem that change for sustainability needs to address. This raises challenges both for the tutor team and participants. Tentative conclusions are reached about the paradoxical nature of educational practice in this contested space, in the light of current trends in higher education.

Originality/value

The paper explores an innovative educational experiment in which the questions raised have wider significance for how managers are helped to bring about pro‐sustainability change.

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

David W. Borowski, Sarah Cawkwell, Syed M. Amir Zaidi, Matthew Toward, Nicola Maguire, Dharmendra K. Garg and Talvinder S. Gill

The NHS Bowel cancer screening programme (NHSBCSP) aims to reduce colorectal cancer (CRC) cumulative mortality by up to 23 per cent; long-term outcomes at national level…

Abstract

Purpose

The NHS Bowel cancer screening programme (NHSBCSP) aims to reduce colorectal cancer (CRC) cumulative mortality by up to 23 per cent; long-term outcomes at national level are not yet known. The purpose of this paper is to examine a local population of CRC patients of screening age for their characteristics and long-term survival in relation to their presentation, including through the NHSBCSP.

Design/methodology/approach

Retrospective analysis of a prospectively maintained CRC database for the years 2009-2014 in a single district hospital providing bowel cancer screening and tertiary rectal cancer services.

Findings

Of 528 CRC patients diagnosed in the screening age range, 144(27.3 per cent) presented through NHSBCSP, 308(58.3 per cent) electively with symptoms and 76(14.4 per cent) as emergency. NHSBCSP-diagnosed patients were younger (median 66 vs 68 and 69 years, respectively, p=0.001), had more often left-sided cancers (59(41.0 per cent) vs 82(26.6 per cent) and 24(31.6 per cent), respectively, p=0.001), more UICC-stage I (42(29.2 per cent) vs 49(15.9 per cent) and 2(2.6 per cent)), stage III (59(41.0 per cent) vs 106(34.4 per cent) and 20(26.3 per cent)) and less stage IV disease (8(5.6 per cent) vs 61(19.8 per cent) and 34 (44.7 per cent), respectively, p<0.001). Three-year overall survival was best for NHSBCSP and worst for emergency patients (87.5 per cent vs 69.0 per cent and 35.3 per cent, respectively, LogRank p<0.001).

Originality/value

Patients diagnosed within the NHSBCSP have improved outcome compared to both symptomatic elective and emergency presentations. A reduction in overall cumulative mortality in order of 25 per cent may well be achieved, but continuing high levels of emergency presentations and undetected right-sided disease emphasise need for further improvement in public participation in the NHSBCSP and research into more sensitive and acceptable alternative screening methods.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

David W. Borowski, Sarah Cawkwell, Syed M. Amir Zaidi, Matthew Toward, Nicola Maguire and Talvinder S. Gill

Higher caseloads are associated with better outcomes for many conditions treated in secondary and tertiary care settings, including colorectal cancer (CRC). There is…

Abstract

Purpose

Higher caseloads are associated with better outcomes for many conditions treated in secondary and tertiary care settings, including colorectal cancer (CRC). There is little known whether such volume-outcome relationship exist in primary care settings. The purpose of this paper is to examine general practitioner (GP) CRC-specific caseload for possible associations with referral pathways, disease stage and CRC patients’ overall survival.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper retrospectively analyses a prospectively maintained CRC database for 2009-2014 in a single district hospital providing bowel cancer screening and tertiary rectal cancer services.

Findings

Of 1,145 CRC patients, 937 (81.8 per cent) were diagnosed as symptomatic cancers. In total, 210 GPs from 44 practices were stratified according to their CRC caseload over the study period into low volume (LV, 1-4); medium volume (MV, 5-7); and high volume (HV, 8-21 cases). Emergency presentation (LV: 49/287 (17.1 per cent); MV: 75/264 (28.4 per cent); HV: 105/386 (27.2 per cent); p=0.007) and advanced disease at presentation (LV: 84/287 (29.3 per cent); MV: 94/264 (35.6 per cent); HV: 144/386 (37.3 per cent); p=0.034) was more common amongst HV GPs. Three-year mortality risk was significantly higher for HV GPs (MV: (hazard ratio) HR 1.185 (confidence interval=0.897-1.566), p=0.231, and HV: HR 1.366 (CI=1.061-1.759), p=0.016), but adjustment for emergency presentation and advanced disease largely accounted for this difference. There was some evidence that HV GPs used elective cancer pathways less frequently (LV: 166/287 (57.8 per cent); MV: 130/264 (49.2 per cent); HV: 182/386 (47.2 per cent); p=0.007) and more selectively (CRC/referrals: LV: 166/2,743 (6.1 per cent); MV: 130/2,321 (5.6 per cent); HV: 182/2,508 (7.3 per cent); p=0.048).

Originality/value

Higher GP CRC caseload in primary care may be associated with advanced disease and poorer survival; more work is required to determine the reasons and to develop targeted intervention at local level to improve elective referral rates.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 December 2022

Thomas N. Garavan, Corina Sheerin, Serge Koukpaki, Fergal O'Brien, Rola Chami-Malaeb, Cliodhna MacKenzie and Joan Buckley

The purpose of this longitudinal study is to qualitatively investigate the role of the general managers (GMs) and senior managers (SMs) in strategic talent management…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this longitudinal study is to qualitatively investigate the role of the general managers (GMs) and senior managers (SMs) in strategic talent management (STM) in hotels during COVID-19. Using upper echelon theory and the dynamic attention-based view, this paper explores the role of upper echelon theory cognitive characteristics (orientation towards STM and decision-making approach) and three dynamic attention-based view attention dimensions (communication, resource attention to the HR function and new configurations of STM) in influencing STM.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses semi-structured interviews with hotel GMs and SMs at two time points over the duration of COVID-19 in six hotels (family-owned, boutique and international hotel chain) located in Ireland, the UK, Germany, Singapore and India.

Findings

The findings of this study reveal that GMs and SMs across the different hotels differed in their orientation towards STM and their decision-making approaches and this influenced cognitive and resource attention to STM. GMs and SMs remained cognitively attentive to STM through their communications around STM, and they revealed resource attention through resources to the HR function and new configurations of STM practices during COVID-19. The authors identify three distinct configurations of STM practices in operation in hotels during COVID-19.

Practical implications

This study’s findings reveal important practice implications in that GMs and SMs have a key role to play in the implementation of STM and the need to reconfigure how STM is undertaken during the crisis. This contrasts with the more espoused role suggested for these talent actors in the literature.

Originality/value

The authors used a longitudinal qualitative research design to surface the dynamic role of GMs’ and SMs’ cognitive and resource attention to STM in hotels during COVID-19 and the key role that orientation towards STM and decision-making approach affected both cognitive and resource attention dimensions.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2008

Suneeta Bhamra, Anthea Tinker, Gill Mein, Richard Ashcroft and Janet Askham

Research that follows people over a period of time (longitudinal or panel studies) is increasingly recognised as of great importance in helping us to understand the ageing…

Abstract

Research that follows people over a period of time (longitudinal or panel studies) is increasingly recognised as of great importance in helping us to understand the ageing process and changes over time in the lives of older people. If people drop out of studies ‐ which older people are more likely to do ‐ the value of the study diminishes. This research draws on evidence from ongoing and previous longitudinal studies of people aged 55 and over to examine what factors encourage the retention of participants and what causes them to drop out. The research is synthesising existing evidence, drawing together the experiences of researchers involved in longitudinal studies, and collecting some new evidence about the views of survey participants. This article reports on the first part of the research by drawing together evidence from other studies. These show that there are some factors that are related to attrition whereas for others the evidence is mixed. Methods employed by these studies to reduce attrition and retain participants are examined. It must be noted that apart from the consistent finding that attrition is associated with age, education, socio‐economic status and cognitive impairment, not all studies examined the same variables; some only being explored by one study. This makes it difficult to draw any further conclusions and indicates that attrition needs to be addressed in a uniform manner by more studies. This article identifies some implications for policy‐makers and practitioners.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

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