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Article
Publication date: 19 May 2020

Charles R. Taylor, Philip J. Kitchen, Matthew E. Sarkees and Christian O. Lolk

Despite increased emphasis on customer or market orientation over the past several decades, there is considerable evidence that many customer service practices have…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite increased emphasis on customer or market orientation over the past several decades, there is considerable evidence that many customer service practices have created a “Janus face” situation in which stated marketing philosophy often differs from practice. This paper aims to explore those issues in marketing practice.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper develops a typology of “new age” practices in customer service that seem to serve to annoy, alienate and even potentially harm consumers. Consumer-coping mechanisms for dealing with such practices are then discussed, arguing that the practices themselves are not in the best long-term interests of the firm. This paper concludes with suggestions for how firms can avoid a “Janus face” situation and better serve today’s educated consumers.

Findings

Too many of today’s ostensibly “marketing”-oriented companies are more concerned with selling and much less concerned with retention or real relationships. Unfortunately, even if companies are doing many things correctly, this does not sound like behavior that should exist in the so-called “marketing era” in the 21st century.

Research limitations/implications

The negative implication of extolling service excellence while delivering the opposite to customers is undesirable. Research that addresses the service challenges that firms face in this fast-changing marketing environment is crucial to advancing academic knowledge.

Practical implications

As marketing moves into 2020 and beyond, it is critical to correct these service issues and problems. Companies cannot really afford to drive away customers in the dynamic age of relationship marketing fueled by rapidly advancing technological change.

Originality/value

This paper presents a typology of “new age” customer service problems.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Matthew E. Sarkees and M. Paula Fitzgerald

Off-label drug prescribing by healthcare providers is a growing practice. Yet, the US Food and Drug Administration bans the marketing of drugs for off-label uses. In…

Abstract

Purpose

Off-label drug prescribing by healthcare providers is a growing practice. Yet, the US Food and Drug Administration bans the marketing of drugs for off-label uses. In recent years, legal challenges by the pharmaceutical industry have chipped away government restrictions on off-label drug promotion. Although the changing legal landscape has been discussed, this paper aims to examine how key stakeholders and policy-makers might interact to provide a more transparent marketing environment for off-label drug discussions in the patient–provider relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on a variety of sources, the authors assess the current marketing landscape of off-label drugs and some of the issues that challenge the healthcare provider–patient relationship. The authors then examine opportunities to improve the off-label promotion environment and the relevant decision-making theories that key stakeholders need to consider when formulating marketing efforts and policies.

Findings

The authors suggest that fewer restrictions on truthful, non-misleading off-label drug promotion provide an opportunity to improve drug knowledge and, importantly, healthcare provider and consumer decision-making. Key stakeholders should consider, among other solutions, criteria for defining truthful information on off-label drugs, alternative methods of approval of off-label uses and ubiquitous icons to identify off-label prescribing to all stakeholders.

Originality/value

Rather than rehash the legal landscape of off-label drug promotion, this paper focuses on how the healthcare provider–patient relationship is impacted and how stakeholders can improve information flow in this changing environment.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Matthew E. Sarkees and Ryan Luchs

Purpose – This chapter explores the basic characteristics of stochastic frontier estimation, discusses advantages of the method that make it conducive to research in…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter explores the basic characteristics of stochastic frontier estimation, discusses advantages of the method that make it conducive to research in international marketing, and provides an application to demonstrate its use. Potential applications in international marketing research are also discussed.

Methodology – Stochastic Frontier Estimation.

Findings – Stochastic frontier estimation models, prevalent in other fields, are very limited in the international marketing literature. Many potential opportunities exist for its use in the context of international marketing.

Originality/value of paper – The intent of this chapter is to show that stochastic frontier estimation is a potentially valuable tool for international marketing research. We show this by demonstrating the use of the tool and by providing examples of potential research studies.

Details

Measurement and Research Methods in International Marketing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-095-7

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Abstract

Details

Measurement and Research Methods in International Marketing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-095-7

Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Marko Sarstedt, Manfred Schwaiger and Charles R. Taylor

“Garbage in, garbage out” is a common expression that academics and practitioners use to emphasize that empirical analysis is only as good as the basis on which it relies…

Abstract

“Garbage in, garbage out” is a common expression that academics and practitioners use to emphasize that empirical analysis is only as good as the basis on which it relies. Although the importance of sound data and valid measures has long been acknowledged, it is nevertheless often problematic to follow required quality standards in concrete research situations. Potential sources of error are usually unknown, methods to ensure data quality are unavailable, and existing methods for scale development, index construction, data collection, and data analysis are insufficient or erroneously applied. This is especially true of international marketing research, which often makes great demands on the data and measures used, as well as on the research methodology applied. Against this background, this volume addresses issues pertaining to measurement and research methodology in an international marketing context. Thanks to the efforts of authors and reviewers, we are pleased to present nine articles that deal with cutting-edge topics such as formative measurement, response-bias in cross-cultural research, marketing efficiency measurement, and segmentation methods.

Details

Measurement and Research Methods in International Marketing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-095-7

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Matthew Sarkees and Ryan Luchs

The purpose of this paper is to explore the gap in the literature as well as investigate how the combination of internal marketing or innovation investments with new…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the gap in the literature as well as investigate how the combination of internal marketing or innovation investments with new product introductions influences alliance type choices. Most research on marketing–innovation resource allocation decisions has focused on trade-offs in internal investments such as advertising versus research and development. Absent from this discussion is whether firms offset a weakness internally by reaching outside the boundaries of the firm through alliances. As a result, managers lack a clear understanding of the potential for complementarity using internal–external approaches to a market.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on the resource-based view of the firm, using a longitudinal secondary data set and a choice model.

Findings

The authors find that firms that internally emphasize either marketing or innovation maintain the same approach externally with respect to alliance type choices. Thus, efforts to complement internal marketing (innovation) resource investments with innovation (marketing) alliances are not seen. However, the interaction of new product introductions with internal resource investments does result in a complementary firm approach.

Originality/value

The authors bridge a gap in the resource investment literature by exploring how the internal decisions impact the external alliance choices. The authors draw on longitudinal data and show that the action of making the choice is important, as it impacts future resource decisions. The authors explore the interaction between new production introductions and internal firm investments on alliance type choice. Given that new product introductions are a key to longer-term firm success, examining these relationships enhances the managerial impact.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 19 May 2015

Abstract

Details

Inquiry-Based Learning for Multidisciplinary Programs: A Conceptual and Practical Resource for Educators
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-847-2

Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Katherine E. Brown and Victoria Syme‐Taylor

This paper aims to explore the ways in which gender and feminism are practised in professional military education (PME), which is viewed as an atypical higher education…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the ways in which gender and feminism are practised in professional military education (PME), which is viewed as an atypical higher education institution, by focusing on the practice and discourse of female academics.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a case study approach using participant observation and semi‐structured interviews. The authors' qualitative analysis is informed by feminist research methods.

Findings

The authors identified a number of key areas around which resistance and accommodation to gender norms are produced: the visual, the vocal and collective action. Analysis of these revealed the everyday practices of academic identities, the gendering of knowledge, and feminist interventions. The authors found that the practices and debates of academic women in PME reflect the wider debates in academia.

Originality/value

PME and its relationship with gender and feminism have rarely been studied. This paper begins that task. The findings of this atypical case also add to the growing body of research on identity, gender, and feminism in academia, as well as to women working in male‐dominated institutions.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 September 2022

Hauke Wetzel, Christina Haenel and Alexandra Claudia Hess

Profitability considerations lead service providers to terminate service contracts with low-value customers. However, customers targeted by service contract terminations…

Abstract

Purpose

Profitability considerations lead service providers to terminate service contracts with low-value customers. However, customers targeted by service contract terminations often take revenge through negative word-of-mouth (NWOM). Presently, it is unclear how service contract termination initiatives prevent this harmful side effect. The purpose of this study is to compare the effectiveness of common service contract termination initiatives for reducing NWOM of customers whose service contracts are being cancelled. The study results provide guidance for minimizing the downside of service contract termination.

Design/methodology/approach

This study distinguishes between service contract termination initiatives common in practice (preannouncement, explanation, financial compensation, apology and support in finding an alternative provider). Drawing on a multi-industry survey of 245 customers who have experienced service contract terminations in real life, the authors estimate regression models to link perceived service contract termination initiatives to NWOM.

Findings

All else equal, only preannouncement and support in finding an alternative are effective to reduce NWOM. This study also shows that the right choice of service contract termination initiatives depends on the context of the termination. Making a preannouncement, offering an explanation and providing support in finding an alternative are more effective in reducing NWOM when these actions are aligned with the contextual factors of relationship duration and competitive intensity.

Research limitations/implications

This study shows that service contract termination needs to address several aspects of the service termination experience. The key implication for future research is that it matters in terms of NWOM how service contract terminations are performed.

Practical implications

This research identifies the service contract termination initiatives that are most effective to reduce NWOM after service contract termination in general and under consideration of the moderating roles of relationship duration and competitive intensity.

Originality/value

While most related studies have considered customer responses to the cancellation of other customers’ contracts, this study contributes to the scarce literature on the undesirable customer responses (such as NWOM) to the termination of their own contract. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, it is the first study in this emerging stream of research that accounts for the effects of process- and outcome-oriented contract termination initiatives on NWOM. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, it is also the first study to account for moderators of the effect of contract termination initiatives on NWOM, namely, relationship duration and competitive intensity.

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Pernilla Derwik and Daniel Hellström

This paper aims to present an integrated view of the literature published on all aspects and facets of competence in supply chain management (SCM) and furthermore provides…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present an integrated view of the literature published on all aspects and facets of competence in supply chain management (SCM) and furthermore provides a framework for classifying and analyzing literature to facilitate further study, practice and research.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review identified 98 peer-reviewed scientific journal publications on the subject of competence in SCM.

Findings

This review identifies and classifies the key content of the subject based on whose competence (level of analysis) and the type of competence (competence element), resulting in a framework that brings together aspects at the individual and organizational level, and of the functional, relational, managerial and behavioral elements of competence from the SCM literature. It furthermore displays the timeliness and wide-ranging character of the subject, as presented by the evolutionary timeline and the main research streams.

Research limitations/implications

Although competence in SCM is a key to business success, the subject is ambiguous and an explicit need exists for more research. This paper provides a foundation for future examination of and theory building in this subject. It also alerts researchers to complementary studies outside of their own “customary” domains.

Practical implications

This paper can support managers in their pursuit to secure competence in SCM and thereby improve outcomes on both individual and organizational level. It can furthermore assist in the development of relevant programs and training sessions.

Originality/value

To the best of authors’ knowledge, this work represents the first systematic literature review on the subject of competence in SCM. In addition, it proposes a taxonomy for mapping and evaluating research on this subject.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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