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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

Matthew Beale and Michael Howley

Studies the development in the UK of the market for no‐and low‐alcohol beers and lagers (NAB/LABs) since the late 1970s. Shows from annual sales figures for the total…

Abstract

Studies the development in the UK of the market for no‐and low‐alcohol beers and lagers (NAB/LABs) since the late 1970s. Shows from annual sales figures for the total market and of advertising expenditures how the growth of the market has been related to levels of promotional investment. Also shows the extent to which British brewers have tried to climb on board the NAB/LAB bandwagon and as a result have introduced a profusion of products, most of them without serious promotional support, and many of them of dubious quality. Takes the view that if the NAB/LAB sector is to grow into a sizeable part of the UK beer market then a rationalization of products should occur and products that continue should be well‐supported and of high quality.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Book part
Publication date: 29 January 2013

Peter Bonsall, Jens Schade, Lars Roessger and Bill Lythgoe

Purpose — The research was designed to explore people's willingness/ability to understand complex road user charges. However, the results raise issues about respondent…

Abstract

Purpose — The research was designed to explore people's willingness/ability to understand complex road user charges. However, the results raise issues about respondent engagement and ecological validity and so have important implications for questionnaire practice.

Methodology — Computer-based experiments administered in the United Kingdom and Germany gathered respondents' estimates of road user charges along with their response latencies, personal characteristics, acceptance of road charging, assessments of task complexity and attitudes to analytical tasks.

Findings — The results demonstrate questionnaire learning effects and show the effect of personal characteristics on the accuracy and speed of questionnaire completion. The tendency of males, younger people and students to complete the task more quickly is interesting as is the fact that fewer and smaller errors were made by participants who claimed to gain satisfaction from completing a task which has involved mental effort. Engagement was seen to vary with personal characteristics, attitudes to decision making, task complexity and acceptance of the policy being tested. A key finding is that disengagement was more evident among participants who were broadly supportive of road charging than among those who were not.

Implications — The findings have important implications for the design of data collection exercises and for the interpretation of resulting data. It is concluded that repeated choice experiments are an inappropriate source of data on responses to unfamiliar circumstances. The collection of data on response latencies and the inclusion of questions on respondents' attitudes to task completion is a strongly recommended addition to standard questionnaire practice. The extent to which disengagement in an experimental context is, or is not, indicative of real-world behaviour is an important and urgent subject for further research.

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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2009

John Kehagias, Emmanuel Skourtis and Aikaterini Vassilikopoulou

Using the product classification proposed by the Commodity School as it was originally expressed and later developed, this research aims to focus on defining pricing…

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Abstract

Purpose

Using the product classification proposed by the Commodity School as it was originally expressed and later developed, this research aims to focus on defining pricing strategies for specific corporate objectives, that is, profit increase, market share increase, and prevention of new competitors from entering the market.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to investigate the relationship between four consumer product categories and alternative pricing strategies in light of various corporate objectives, a set of research questions and propositions was formed and tested on the basis of data reflecting opinions expressed by marketing executives through a mailed survey in Greece.

Findings

For convenience and preference products, the low‐price strategy is used more often, irrespective of corporate objectives, whereas the high‐price strategy is used more often, irrespective of corporate objectives, for specialty products. For shopping products, the low‐price strategy is used more often when the main corporate objectives are increased market share and the prevention of new competitors from entering the market, but when the main corporate objective is increased profits, the high‐price strategy tends to prevail.

Research limitations/implications

The current research could be further expanded to cover other related topics such as the pricing policies and specific pricing methods that are used in the four product categories in combination with the pricing strategies they relate to and serve.

Practical implications

For marketers, the development of the proposed framework can serve as a basis for pricing decisions, provided, of course, that they use research‐based information about the extent to which their products have the attributes of a certain product category.

Originality/value

As the literature review revealed, no conceptual links have been made between the three important parameters examined, that is, product categories, corporate objectives, and pricing strategies, that can form a pricing framework for consumer products. This research serves as a starting point for developing such a three‐point framework.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Book part
Publication date: 11 July 2019

Tanya Fitzgerald and Sally Knipe

Abstract

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Historical Perspectives on Teacher Preparation in Aotearoa New Zealand
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-640-0

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2019

Kay Whitehead

Commencing with publications in the 1970s, the purpose of this paper is to review the historical writing about Australian and New Zealand teachers over the past 50 years.

Abstract

Purpose

Commencing with publications in the 1970s, the purpose of this paper is to review the historical writing about Australian and New Zealand teachers over the past 50 years.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper incorporates men and women who led and taught in domestic spaces, per-school, primary, secondary and higher education. It is structured around publications in the ANZHES Journal and History of Education Review, and includes research published in other forums as appropriate. The literature review is selective rather than comprehensive.

Findings

Since the 1980s, the history of New Zealand and Australian teachers has mostly focussed on women educators in an increasing array of contexts, and incorporated various theoretical perspectives over time.

Originality/value

The paper highlights key themes and identifies potential directions for research into Australian and New Zealand teachers.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 48 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2018

Hannah Prytherch, Laura Lea and Matthew Richardson

The purpose of this paper is to examine service-users’ experiences of mentoring trainee clinical psychologists as part of an involvement initiative on a doctoral training course.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine service-users’ experiences of mentoring trainee clinical psychologists as part of an involvement initiative on a doctoral training course.

Design/methodology/approach

Seven service-users were paired with trainee clinical psychologists. Pairs met for one hour monthly over six months. Meetings were unstructured, lacked a formal agenda and were not evaluated academically. All seven mentors were interviewed. They were asked about positive and negative experiences, as well as about the support provided. Transcripts were subject to thematic analysis and themes were reviewed by mentors in a follow-up meeting.

Findings

Overall, the results demonstrate that service-users can be involved in training in a way that they find meaningful and contribute to their recovery. Seven themes were identified: giving hope and optimism; making a difference; personal and professional development; the process; practicalities/logistics; support (positives); and support (areas for improvement).

Practical implications

The importance of designing involvement initiatives in a way which implicitly supports service-user values was highlighted. Recommendations for designing effective support structures are given. The authors were also involved in the scheme which could have introduced bias.

Originality/value

The research exploring service-users’ experiences of involvement in training health professionals is limited. This was the first study to explore in depth service-users’ perspectives of involvement in a scheme such as the mentoring scheme. If initiatives are to seriously embrace the values of the service-user movement then seeking service-users’ perspectives is vital.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1901

One of the commonest excuses put forward in defence of the practice of treating milk, butter, meat, and other foods with ‘preservative’ drugs no longer possesses even the…

Abstract

One of the commonest excuses put forward in defence of the practice of treating milk, butter, meat, and other foods with ‘preservative’ drugs no longer possesses even the appearance of validity. Several of the large railway companies are adding refrigerator vans in considerable numbers to their rolling‐stock, and this fact should make it no longer possible for defendants to plead that the necessity of sending food‐products a long distance by rail involves the necessity of mixing preservative chemicals with them. Although the excuse referred to will not bear examination, it is a very specious one, and in those instances where evidence has not been brought forward to refute it, it has produced some effect on the minds of magistrates and others. It cannot be too often pointed out that such substances as boracic acid, salicylic acid, and formaldehyde are dangerous drugs, and that their unacknowledged presence in articles of food constitutes a serious danger to the public. Such substances are not foods, and are not natural constituents of any food. In most instances they are purposely introduced into food‐products to avoid the expense attending the proper production, preparation, and distribution of the food, or to conceal the inferior quality of an article by masking the signs of commencing decomposition or incipient putrefaction, and thus to enable a dishonest producer or vendor to palm off as fresh and wholesome an article which may be not only of bad quality, but absolutely dangerous to the consumer. The use of these substances, in any quantity whatsoever, and the sale of articles containing them, without the fullest and clearest disclosure of their presence, is as gross and as dangerous a form of adulteration as any which has at any time been exposed. In no single instance can it be shown that these drugs are, to quote the words of the Act of 1875, matters or ingredients “required for the preparation or production of a food as an article of commerce,” nor, of course, can it be contended that such substances are “extraneous matters with which the food is unavoidably mixed during the process of collection or preparation.” In reality, even under our inadequate and unsatisfactory adulteration laws, through which the proverbial coach‐and‐four can be so easily driven in so many directions, there ought to be no loophole of escape for the deliberate and dishonest drugger of foods. While the presence of preservative chemicals in any quantity whatever in articles of food constitutes adulteration, wherever the quantity is sufficient to allow the production of the specific “preservative” effect of the substance added, that fact alone is enough to make the food so drugged a food which must be regarded as injurious to the health of the consumer—in view of the inhibitory effect which, by its very nature, the antiseptic must produce on the process of digestion. To our knowledge the food market in this country is flooded with all sorts of inferior food‐products which are rarely dealt with under the Adulteration Acts, and which are loaded with so‐called preservatives. There will be no adequate protection for the public against the consumption of this injurious rubbish until the consumer sees the advantage of insisting upon an authoritative and permanent guarantee of quality with his goods, and until manufacturers of the better class at length find it to be a necessity for their continued prosperity that they should supply, apart entirely from their own statements, an independent and powerful guarantee of this kind.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 3 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1902

In connection with the suggestion recently made in the BRITISH FOOD JOURNAL to the effect that a National Pure Food Association should be established it is of importance…

Abstract

In connection with the suggestion recently made in the BRITISH FOOD JOURNAL to the effect that a National Pure Food Association should be established it is of importance to call attention to the fact that a society describing itself as the “League for the Defence of Human Life” has been recently formed in Paris with the object of preventing the frauds practised by dishonest traders upon their customers. One of the obligations entered into by the members of the League is to discover and prosecute persons engaged in the sale of adulterated or injurious articles of food and drink. Judging from the recent reports of the proceedings of certain Parisian tradesmen it would appear that a society of this description has much scope for its operations in the French Metropolis, and, as we have suggested, a society with similar objects might with advantage be formed in this country, with branches in all the principal cities and towns. With the legal machinery placed at the disposal of local authorities, cumbrous, inadequate and weak as it is, much more might be done in the way of repression if only the responsible authorities could be brought better to appreciate their duty.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1912

President, Charles S. Goldman, M.P.; Chairman, Charles Bathurst, M.P.; Vice‐Presidents: Christopher Addison, M.D., M.P., Waldorf Astor, M.P., Charles Bathurst, M.P.…

Abstract

President, Charles S. Goldman, M.P.; Chairman, Charles Bathurst, M.P.; Vice‐Presidents: Christopher Addison, M.D., M.P., Waldorf Astor, M.P., Charles Bathurst, M.P., Hilaire Belloc, Ralph D. Blumenfeld, Lord Blyth, J.P., Colonel Charles E. Cassal, V.D., F.I.C., the Bishop of Chichester, Sir Arthur H. Church, K.C.V.O., M.A., D.Sc., F.R.S., Sir Wm. Earnshaw Cooper, C.I.E., E. Crawshay‐Williams, M.P., Sir Anderson Critchett, Bart., C.V.O., F.R.C.S.E., William Ewart, M.D., F.R.C.P., Lieut.‐Colonel Sir Joseph Fayrer, Bart., M.A., M.D., Sir Alfred D. Fripp, K.C.V.O., C.B., M.B., M.S., Sir Harold Harmsworth, Bart., Arnold F. Hills, Sir Victor Horsley, M.D., F.R.C.S., F.R.S., O. Gutekunst, Sir H. Seymour King, K.C.I.E., M.A., the Duke of Manchester, P.C., Professor Sir Wm. Osler, Bart., M.D., F.R.S., Sir Gilbert Parker, D.C.L., M.P., Sir Wm. Ramsay, K.C.B., LL.D., M.D., F.R.S., Harrington Sainsbury, M.D., F.R.C.P., W. G. Savage, M.D., B.Sc., R. H. Scanes Spicer, M.D., M.R.C.S., the Hon. Lionel Walrond, M.P., Hugh Walsham, M.D., F.R.C.P., Harvey W. Wiley, M.D., Evelyn Wrench.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2018

Luis Acedo, Marta Botella, Juan Carlos Cortés, J. Ignacio Hidalgo, Esther Maqueda and Rafael Jacinto Villanueva

The purpose of this paper is to study insulin pump therapy and accurate monitoring of glucose levels in diabetic patients, which are current research trends in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study insulin pump therapy and accurate monitoring of glucose levels in diabetic patients, which are current research trends in diabetology. Both problems have a wide margin for improvement and promising applications in the control of parameters and levels involved.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors have registered data for the levels of glucose in diabetic patients throughout a day with a temporal resolution of 5 minutes, the amount and time of insulin administered and time of ingestion. The estimated quantity of carbohydrates is also monitored. A mathematical model for Type 1 patients was fitted piecewise to these data and the evolution of the parameters was analyzed.

Findings

They have found that the parameters for the model change abruptly throughout a day for the same patient, but this set of parameters account with precision for the evolution of the glucose levels in the test patients. This fitting technique could be used to personalize treatments for specific patients and predict the glucose-level variations in terms of hours or even shorter periods of time. This way more effective insulin pump therapies could be developed.

Originality/value

The proposed model could allow for the development of improved schedules on insulin pump therapies.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

Keywords

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