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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2014

Peter Ling and Kym Fraser

The purpose of this chapter is to provide a framework to guide learning and teaching practice in next generation learning spaces. The framework is informed by both…

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to provide a framework to guide learning and teaching practice in next generation learning spaces. The framework is informed by both learning and teaching theory and the current context of the sector. The framework provides guidance to those who teach in next generation learning spaces and is illustrated with examples of effective pedagogic practices that use the affordances of spaces while avoiding their limitations. The chapter discusses the tension between next generation learning space design and use. Design is influenced by drivers ranging from a need to accommodate ever-larger student numbers and responding to digital technologies and other developments in educational media, to providing for new approaches to learning. Use is determined by understandings of the teaching task, which can range from presentation by a teacher through to students working individually or in groups to generate meaningful knowledge, useful skills and professional values. In this chapter we identify drivers underpinning the creation and design of next generation learning spaces in universities today and associated expectations of the ways in which the spaces will be used. We reflect on understandings of sound pedagogic practice and work through to implications for learning and teaching in NGLS. In some cases advocated pedagogic practice asks teaching staff to make the most of spaces designed to allow students to engage constructively in their learning. In other cases it involves teaching constructively in spite of the design of the space.

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The Future of Learning and Teaching in Next Generation Learning Spaces
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-986-7

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2014

Lisa Germany

Many universities are currently investing significant sums of money into refurbishing existing learning spaces and/or building further infrastructure (including Next…

Abstract

Many universities are currently investing significant sums of money into refurbishing existing learning spaces and/or building further infrastructure (including Next Generation Learning Spaces (NGLS)) to support learning and teaching in the face-to-face context. While this is usually welcome by staff and students, there is often a concern that designs are not informed by input from appropriate stakeholders.

This chapter brings together information from a range of sources to provide practical ideas and advice on designing robust, whole-of-lifecycle evaluations for learning space projects. By incorporating pre- and post-occupancy stages, involving a wide array of stakeholders and looking beyond surveys and focus groups as evaluation techniques, universities can ensure that future designs take into consideration the experiences and context of staff and students at the institution as well as lessons learned from previous projects.

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The Future of Learning and Teaching in Next Generation Learning Spaces
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-986-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Matthew Andrews

Performance‐based budgeting (PBB) is a prominent reform around the world, and has been in prominence in the USA for over a decade now. Evidence presented in this article…

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Abstract

Performance‐based budgeting (PBB) is a prominent reform around the world, and has been in prominence in the USA for over a decade now. Evidence presented in this article suggests, however, that the reform is commonly implemented in a limited fashion. This raises the questions, “Why do few states adopt PBB meaningfully?” and “What needs to be done to ensure meaningful adoption?”. In addressing these questions with reference to case studies of state performance‐based budgeting, this article suggests that a three‐factor model is useful in thinking about PBB implementation. In this model authority, acceptance and ability intersect to determine the “reform space” a government has for PBB. In most governments this reform space seems rather constrained.

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International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2019

Stan Trembach, Jayne Blodgett, Annie Epperson and Natasha Floersch

The purpose of this paper is to advocate for change in academic library space assessment and use philosophy in favor of a more user-centered approach emphasizing space…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to advocate for change in academic library space assessment and use philosophy in favor of a more user-centered approach emphasizing space designed for and by users themselves. This goal is achieved by analyzing the implementation of a recent space assessment project at the University of Northern Colorado Libraries to investigate specific patterns of library space utilization.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a case study for which data were collected through a multi-method approach, including flip chart and whiteboard questions, brief semi-structured “tabling” interviews, and more in-depth “roving” interviews.

Findings

The current library literature on space assessment does not encompass broader, more holistic approaches to how library space is used by students, faculty, staff and community users. The findings from this study highlight the diversity of ways patrons may use an academic library, many of which are related to academic work. However, visitors also come to the library for other purposes, such as socializing or attending an event. It is imperative that the space be adequately equipped to meet varied visitor needs and to create a welcoming environment for all patrons.

Originality/value

The paper has several implications for planning and managing the operations of medium-sized academic libraries. It contributes to the larger conversation in higher education about the importance of user research for enhancing visitor experience through data-informed decision-making. Furthermore, the project it details is not an isolated assessment effort but part of the library’s ongoing space assessment work.

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Library Management, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2010

Peter Gilbert and K Fulford

Western societies have been shaken by the economic crisis brought on by ‘casino capitalism’ and the recklessness of the financial institutions. Once esteemed financial…

Abstract

Western societies have been shaken by the economic crisis brought on by ‘casino capitalism’ and the recklessness of the financial institutions. Once esteemed financial institutions, like Lehman Brothers, are now shown to have used dubious accounting methods to cover losses; and accountants, regulators and governments have come under scrutiny. In public life, the scandal of MPs' expenses at Westminster and the blockages in legislative assemblies in the US are compounded in England by reports of deficient and degrading care in acute hospitals, where organisational considerations appear to have taken over from the prime mission of patient care. At this time, a new, or perhaps rediscovered, form of leadership is required. One that taps into the spirit, the animating and motivating force within individuals and groups, and uses values to create a better public service for all.

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International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2020

Beatrice Yan-yan Dang

This study aims to explore the opportunities and constraints for learner identity formation among community college transfer students.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the opportunities and constraints for learner identity formation among community college transfer students.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from four in-depth interviews with five transfer students across an academic year (i.e. 20 interviews in total). The first interview allowed the current researcher to explore the context of students' community college experiences and their first semester in the university. The second and third interview had two purposes: (1) to provide an opportunity for students to discuss their second semester experiences and (2) to understand the process of learner identity formation. The last interview allowed the students to reflect on their time in the university after studying for one year.

Findings

The findings reveal that higher education (HE) learner identity was nurtured by peer support, orientation activities and mentorship programme. While, striving for self-improvement and developing into an autonomous and active learner are essential in the formation of the HE learner identity in university.

Originality/value

This study represents the local students' voice that enrolling in community colleges with the goal of transferring to University Grant Committee (UGC)-funded universities. Transition is a process of change in the course of life and also a shift from one identity to another (Ecclestone et al., 2010). A smooth transition may contribute to the formation of positive learner identity, which is essential to student retention and persistence.

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Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2012

Jane Burdett and Joanna Crossman

Australia has enjoyed two decades of growth in international student enrolments. This phenomenon, combined with the evolution of quality assurance policy frameworks, has…

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3558

Abstract

Purpose

Australia has enjoyed two decades of growth in international student enrolments. This phenomenon, combined with the evolution of quality assurance policy frameworks, has stimulated interest in the social and academic experiences of international students and their educational outcomes. The Australian Universities Quality Agency's (AUQA) second round of quality audits assessed and reported on the performance of Australian universities in the area of “internationalisation”. AUQA findings and recommendations for required action send powerful messages to guide university priorities, practices and strategies in pursuit of quality enhancement in relation to student engagement. This paper seeks to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a thematic analysis approach to explore “internationalisation” in 14 AUQA audit reports published between 2006 and 2010.

Findings

This paper identifies three key areas arising from AUQA audit reports that form a basis for discussion in this paper. These areas are: the social and academic engagement of both international and local students, and matters relating to English language standards and support. Observations arising from AUQA university reports direct attention to examples of initiatives that appear to be enriching the quality of the student engagement and indicate where further development may be required.

Practical implications

In seeking strategies for enhanced student experience, AUQA supports collaboration across universities in devising models for identifying student needs and creating mechanisms that bring about quality student experience, engagement and language outcomes. This analysis of the reports will likely assist those stakeholders working in universities who wish to identify successful approaches to promote the engagement of international students and refine existing useful and positive strategies in implementing and developing ideas in their own individual university contexts.

Originality/value

Analysis of the substantial text of AUQA reports have been underexploited by researchers to date. This paper is likely to be of interest to those stakeholders of international education in universities, not only in Australia but in other national contexts where international students are significantly represented.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2019

Sarel Lavy, Elmira Daneshpour and Kunhee Choi

This study aims to investigate critical spatial factors that may affect the utilization rate of graduate student study space in higher education institutions (HEI). It is…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate critical spatial factors that may affect the utilization rate of graduate student study space in higher education institutions (HEI). It is anticipated that the results of this study could promote research productivity by more effectively engaging research space dedicated to graduate students.

Design/methodology/approach

A comparative quantitative analysis based on survey results was implemented. The quantitative study compares the results of Department A of the university under study with other departments on the same campus. Logistic regression is used for quantitative translation of the categorical data.

Findings

Noise level and furniture quality (both for comfort and layout design) are almost equally the most significant factors for attracting graduate students to study lounges. Based on the results from this study, with quality improvements of noise level or furniture, the probability of user occupancy rates in graduate lounges would triple.

Research limitations/implications

Being a case study, the quantitative results are only applicable to the one university studied. However, the significance of noise and furniture quality as the prime factors for successful graduate study lounges could be bolstered with findings from other case studies around the nation and the world.

Originality/value

This study attempts to pay close attention to graduate lounge spaces within HEI. With the rising pressure on universities to offer greater benefits with the same space assets, this study helps facility managers create more efficient spaces at universities tailored for the modern style of education.

Details

Facilities , vol. 38 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Inka Sankari, Antti Peltokorpi and Suvi Nenonen

Today, academic work includes increasingly informal and collaborative activities. This research attempts to determine whether stakeholders in the development of learning…

Abstract

Purpose

Today, academic work includes increasingly informal and collaborative activities. This research attempts to determine whether stakeholders in the development of learning spaces in higher education could benefit from the principles of co-working space. This paper aims to determine whether a need exists for co-working space as a learning space solution from the viewpoint of academic space users. This determination will be made by examining the following research question: How does the co-working space concept meet user expectations regarding academic space?

Design/methodology/approach

The research question is answered by investigating users’ experiences of existing learning spaces in higher education in light of future workplace needs. Users’ requirements are examined by analysing user experience survey and interviews. The results are confirmed by focus group interviews and examined in the light of co-working space characteristics that are identified in the literature from the viewpoint of workplace management by searching for similarities between descriptions in the literature and the empirical data.

Findings

This research suggests that academic space users would appreciate it if the spaces they use would reflect some of the co-working space characteristics. These characteristics are community, multipurpose office, high accessibility and attractive workplace. A less applicable co-working space characteristic is space as service.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study are based on one case, which limits the generalisability of the results.

Practical implications

The results provide suggestions for corporate real estate management and stakeholders in academic institutions to consider when renovating outdated spaces.

Originality/value

The paper expands the literature on learning spaces in higher education and related practices by linking it with co-working spaces, thereby contributing to a field that has not yet been explored in depth.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2014

Jane Burdett

The purpose of this study was to explore local and international business students' perceptions of their intercultural group work experience as a mechanism for developing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to explore local and international business students' perceptions of their intercultural group work experience as a mechanism for developing intercultural competence and group work skills.

Design/methodology/approach

Using qualitative interviews, the group work experiences of 11 final-year undergraduate local and international students in a business program in a large Australian university were analysed.

Findings

The findings suggest that international and local students working together on group assignments create social and academic situations that result in “at best” limited positive intercultural learning and relationships. Differences in expectations, motivations, language fluency, trust and relationship issues were evident when students collaborated on group assignments. Thus, it appears that group assignments are potentially flawed mechanisms for delivering the goals of intercultural competence and group work skills in business students.

Practical implications

Although this exploratory study is limited in scope, the research has implications for pedagogical strategies, in particular, the use and design of group assignments and the preparation of students for working on group tasks in intercultural groups. It also has implications for developing effective learning mechanisms that lead to improved student intercultural competence, greater socio-cultural engagement and the academic success of international and local business students, as well as positive learning experiences for all.

Originality/value

The findings of this study are likely to be a useful resource for university staff considering the use of group work assignments for the development of intercultural understanding and competence and collaborative skills.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

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