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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 17 May 2019

Rosina Wanyama, Theda Gödecke, Matthias Jager and Matin Qaim

Micronutrient malnutrition is a public health problem in many developing countries, especially in the poorest population segments. Fortification and other food-based…

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Abstract

Purpose

Micronutrient malnutrition is a public health problem in many developing countries, especially in the poorest population segments. Fortification and other food-based approaches, such as using more nutritious ingredients in processing, could help to address this problem, but little is known about poor consumers’ attitudes toward nutritionally enhanced foods. The purpose of this paper is to analyze whether poor consumers in Africa would purchase foods with more nutritious ingredients and the related willingness and ability to pay.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey and choice experiment were conducted with 600 randomly selected households in the poorest neighborhoods of Nairobi (Kenya) and Kampala (Uganda). Participants were asked to choose between various alternatives of porridge flour with different types of nutritional attributes. The data were analyzed with mixed logit models. Porridge flour is widely consumed among the urban poor, so that the example can also provide interesting broader lessons.

Findings

Poor consumers welcome foods that are micronutrient-fortified or include new types of nutritious ingredients. However, willingness to pay for nutritional attributes is small. New ingredients that are perceived to have little effect on taste and appearance are seen more positively than ingredients that may change food products more notably.

Practical implications

New nutritionally enhanced foods have good potential in markets for the poor, if they build on local consumption habits and are not associated with significant price increases.

Originality/value

This is among the first studies to explicitly analyze poor consumers’ preferences for nutritionally enhanced foods.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 September 2022

Mayank Saini, Garima Chandna and Savita Ubba

The objective of the study is to systematically review the existing research in the topical domain of farmers’ direct link with supermarkets. The authors present a…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of the study is to systematically review the existing research in the topical domain of farmers’ direct link with supermarkets. The authors present a state-of-the-art structure of the field and provide directions for future research in the domain. The major aim of this study is to synthesize the research field and answer some specific questions, like what do we know about this field and where should we be heading.

Design/methodology/approach

A pool of 275 articles published from 2002 to 2022 were retrieved from the Scopus database and analyzed using the R-based Biblioshiny and visualized using VOSviewer. The research design is a mix of quantitative bibliometric technique and qualitative content analysis. Bibliometric method ensures the objectivity while content analysis ensures the scholarly evaluation.

Findings

Major findings include production trend, dominant keywords, leading publication outlets and country-wise analysis of the selected articles. The authors found that sub-domains like economic aspects, participation hurdles and the rise of supermarkets are the most researched topics while operational issues, their pragmatic solutions, sustainability and innovation are the emerging sub-fields that need more academic attention.

Research limitations/implications

The major limitation is the use of single data source, i.e. Scopus, and it is quite possible that useful studies that are not covered by Scopus remain excluded.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first attempts to systematically review the previous research on the selected topic. It will help researchers to understand the present status, identify future research directions, and pursue more reasonable and relevant topics of research.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2011

Matin Qaim

Purpose – The role of genetically modified (GM) crops for food security is the subject of controversial debates. Consequently, policy-makers are unsure whether this…

Abstract

Purpose – The role of genetically modified (GM) crops for food security is the subject of controversial debates. Consequently, policy-makers are unsure whether this technology is suitable for developing countries. This chapter reviews the scientific evidence.

Methodology/approach – Starting from a food security definition, potential pathways of how GM crops could contribute to hunger reduction are analyzed conceptually. Furthermore, studies about the socioeconomic impacts of GM crop applications are reviewed. This includes ex post studies for present applications such as insect-resistant and herbicide-tolerant crops, as well as ex ante studies for future GM technologies such as Golden Rice and drought-tolerant varieties.

Findings – GM crops can raise agricultural productivity and thus contribute to better food availability. Especially when tailored to small farm conditions, GM crops can also cause income increases for the rural poor, entailing better access to food. Nutritionally enhanced, biofortified GM crops could reduce problems of micronutrient malnutrition in a cost-effective way.

Research limitations – The examples observable so far are still limited. Impacts also depend on the wider institutional setting. Like any technology, GM crops are not a substitute but a complement to much needed institutional and infrastructure improvement in developing countries.

Social implications – The fact that available GM crops already contribute to poverty reduction and improved food security has not been widely recognized up until now.

Value of paper – Results presented in this chapter can contribute to a more constructive public debate, in which GM crop risks are not discussed out of the context of actual and potential benefits.

Details

Genetically Modified Food and Global Welfare
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-758-2

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Julian Witjaksono, Xiaowen Wei, Suchun Mao, Wankui Gong, Yabing Li and Youlu Yuan

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the current state of knowledge on the economic performance of genetically modified (GM) cotton worldwide based on a…

8142

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the current state of knowledge on the economic performance of genetically modified (GM) cotton worldwide based on a wide range of data and source from available literature, and second to assess yield gain and economic performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review was captured to provide the evidence of potential benefits of GM cotton. A country-specific analysis was conducted in order to compare economic indicators and employed meta-analysis to find out the significance of the different of GM cotton over its counterpart.

Findings

This paper depicts positive impact of commercialized GM cotton in terms of net revenue, and the benefits, especially in terms of increased yields, are greatest for the mostly farmers in developing countries who have benefitted from the spill over of technology targeted at farmers in industrialized countries.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the variability of the data which came from different methodologies, it is difficult to determine the differences of the performances each individual study.

Practical implications

This, it is believed that results from this study can be useful for operations of all sizes as the authors think about what needs to be focussed on for long-term producers survival.

Originality/value

The paper clearly indicates that China is the highest cotton yield of GM cotton, the lowest cost of GM seed and the lowest cost of chemical spray compare to any other countries. Therefore, this is the fact that the adoption of GM cotton has been widely spread among the farmers across the regions in China.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

Marcus Mergenthaler, Katinka Weinberger and Matin Qaim

The purpose of this paper is to seek to show how the implementation of different quality assurance programs (QAPs) affects international market access for horticultural…

1848

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to seek to show how the implementation of different quality assurance programs (QAPs) affects international market access for horticultural processing firms in developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

A representative survey of 50 registered firms processing horticultural produce in Vietnam was conducted. Logistic regression models are used to analyze the effects of QAPs and other firm level factors on participation in different export supply chains.

Findings

QAPs influence firms' participation in export supply chains significantly. While the implementation of internationally recognized QAPs improves access to OECD markets, national QAPs are more important for exports to non‐OECD countries.

Practical implications

Horticultural processing firms in developing countries can improve their access to export markets when they implement formal QAPs. There is segmentation between non‐OECD supply chains, for which national QAPs suffice, and OECD supply chains with higher food safety and quality requirements, for which international QAPs are important. Depending on the intended target markets, firms can adjust their strategies accordingly.

Originality/value

This study contributes empirically to the literature on private sector food regulations and developing country exports by using a unique set of firm level data from Vietnam. While analyzing the impact of QAPs on export market access, it is differentiated between national and international QAPs. Policy implications are discussed.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2011

Abstract

Details

Genetically Modified Food and Global Welfare
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-758-2

Article
Publication date: 21 April 2022

Nurgul Arslan, Jiyan Aslan Ceylan and Abdulkerim Hatipoğlu

University students are one of the vulnerable groups in terms of having nutritional problems due to their lifestyle and social environment. This study aims to determine…

Abstract

Purpose

University students are one of the vulnerable groups in terms of having nutritional problems due to their lifestyle and social environment. This study aims to determine the consumption of fast food among university students and evaluate factors that may impact it, such as sociodemographic factors, body mass index (BMI) or nutritional habits.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional study was conducted among a random sample of 184 university students (47.8% men and 52.2% women) with a mean age of 21.1 ± 2.0 years. The survey included students’ sociodemographic characteristics, anthropometric measurements, nutritional habits and fast-food consumption. Chi-square test, t-test and binary logistic regression analysis were used depending on the characteristics of the data.

Findings

Results indicated that 39.7% of the students consumed fast food at least once in 15 days and preferred these foods for taste, workload and social activity. Consumption of fast food occurred at an earlier age in men (%13.6) and the portions were higher than portions of vegetables (p = 0.001). By using regression analysis, a statistically significant relationship was found between the frequency of fast-food consumption and age, gender, economic status, BMI, the amount of vegetables consumed daily and the habit of eating breakfast (p < 0.05).

Research limitations/implications

It is planned to reach more students in the study. However, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, transportation to students became difficult or could not be reached.

Originality/value

This study is one of the rare studies examining students’ orientation to fast food. The number of studies in this field in Turkey is limited.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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