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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2019

Mathieu Olivier and Olivier Paré-Lambert

This paper aims to present a fluid-structure coupling partitioned scheme involving rigid bodies supported by spring-damper systems. This scheme can be used with already…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a fluid-structure coupling partitioned scheme involving rigid bodies supported by spring-damper systems. This scheme can be used with already existing fluid flow solvers without the need to modify them.

Design/methodology/approach

The scheme is based on a modified Broyden method. It solves the equations of solid body motion in which the external forces coming from the flow are provided by a segregated flow solver used as a black box. The whole scheme is implicit.

Findings

The proposed partitioned method is stable even in the ultimate case of very strong fluid–solid interactions involving a massless cylinder oscillating with no structural damping. The overhead associated with the coupling scheme represents an execution time increase by a factor of about 2 to 5, depending on the context. The scheme also has the advantage of being able to incorporate turbulence modeling directly through the flow solver. It has been tested successfully with URANS simulations without wall law, thus involving thin high aspect-ratio cells near the wall.

Originality/value

Such problems are known to be very difficult to solve and previous studies usually rely on monolithic approaches. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time a partitioned scheme is used to solve fluid–solid interactions involving massless components.

Details

International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0961-5539

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2015

Adnane Kendel and Nathalie Lazaric

The purpose of this paper is to study business models (BMs) for smart meters (SMs) and discuss related issues in the French institutional context. Because SM introduce…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study business models (BMs) for smart meters (SMs) and discuss related issues in the French institutional context. Because SM introduce deregulation on both the demand and supply sides, the authors argue that they represent an opportunity to “unlock” the system by enabling feedback to consumers. The authors discuss the empirical findings from the TICELEC (Technologies de l’Information pour une Consommation Electrique – Information Technology for Sustainable Electricity Consumption Behaviors) project which is an experimental initiative to measure potential energy savings through the implementation of SM, and to test behavioral change.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical data are from the TICELEC project and refer to a municipality in southern France. The project was designed to show the qualitative changes deriving from a new technology, and the quantitative changes in the form of real reductions in residential electricity consumption in the short and medium terms. The authors discuss these changes and their potential replication, and examine the nature of the feedback provided to users and the implications for SM BMs for France and for smart cities more generally.

Findings

The authors suggest that the opportunities provided by SM have to be compared with other kinds of intervention such as self-monitoring procedures. The results show that any intervention is important for moderating the sole impact of SM. The findings on the importance of changes to “energy habits” relate mainly to “curtailment” and “low efficiency” behaviors, which represent less costly changes. The lessons learned for BM developments linked to SM include incentive systems, smart tariffs, and technologies to increase potential behavior changes and energy savings in this field.

Research limitations/implications

The authors’ analysis of the content of behavioral change shows that curtailment behavior and low-efficiency behavior remain dominant when SMs are implemented. Promoting high-efficiency behaviors is always difficult for reasons of cost. Thus, SM should be combined with other measures such as incentives systems, e.g. “smart tariffication,” and new services to increase their impact.

Practical implications

A proper combination of smart tariffs and SMs to reduce peaks in demand would appear to be critical to boost SM development. It will also be important to integrate SMs with smart grids to improve energy efficiency and exploit renewables and energy storage in electricity networks.

Social implications

SMs are important but any interventions that motivate households to change their energy habits also help in the French context. SMs enable households to try to reduce their energy consumption but they are not the solution.

Originality/value

There are no detailed results published for France. Utilities such as Electricite Reseau Distribution France, have introduced R & D programs oriented to the deployment of SM which have been tested since 2009 (e.g. see the local LINKY meter projects in Lyon and Touraine). The empirical data are from the TICELEC project and refer to a municipality in southern France. The project was designed to show the qualitative changes deriving from a new technology, and the quantitative changes in the form of real reductions in residential electricity consumption in the short and medium terms. The authors discuss these changes and their potential replication, and examine the nature of the feedback provided to users and the implications for SM BMs for France and for smart cities more generally.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Sophie Lacoste-Badie, Karine Gallopel-Morvan, Mathieu Lajante and Olivier Droulers

This study aims to investigate the role of two structural factors – threat level depicted on fear messages and warning size – as well as two contextual factors – repeated…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the role of two structural factors – threat level depicted on fear messages and warning size – as well as two contextual factors – repeated exposure and type of packs – on pictorial and threatening tobacco warnings’ effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

A two (warning threat level: moderate vs high) × two (coverage: 40 vs 75 per cent) × two (packaging type: plain vs branded) within-subjects experiment was carried out. Subjects were exposed three times to pictorial and threatening tobacco warnings. Both self-report and psychophysiological measurements of emotion were used.

Findings

Results indicate that threat level is the most effective structural factor to influence smokers’ reactions, while warning size has very low impact. Furthermore, emotional arousal, fear and disgust, as well as attitude toward tobacco brand, decrease after the second exposure to pictorial and threatening tobacco warnings, but stay stable at the third exposure. However, there is no effect of repetition on the emotional valence component, arousal-subjective component, on intention of quitting or of reducing cigarette consumption. Finally, there is a negative effect of plain packs on attitude toward tobacco brand over repeated exposures, but there is no effect of the type of packs on smokers’ emotions and intentions.

Social implications

Useful marketing social guidance, which might help government decision-makers increase the effectiveness of smoking reduction measures, is offered.

Originality/value

For the first time in this context, psychophysiological and self-report measurements were combined to measure smokers’ reactions toward pictorial and threatening tobacco warnings in a repeated exposure study.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2019

Grégory Millot, Olivier Scholz, Saïd Ouhamou, Mathieu Becquet and Sébastien Magnabal

The paper deals with research activities to develop optimization workflows implying computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling. The purpose of this paper is to present…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper deals with research activities to develop optimization workflows implying computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling. The purpose of this paper is to present an industrial and fully-automated optimal design tool, able to handle objectives, constraints, multi-parameters and multi-points optimization on a given CATIA CAD. The work is realized on Rapid And CostEffective Rotorcraft compound rotorcraft in the framework of the Fast RotorCraft Innovative Aircraft Demonstrator Platform (IADP) within the Clean Sky 2 programme.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed solution relies on an automated CAD-CFD workflow called through the optimization process based on surrogate-based optimization (SBO) techniques. The SBO workflow has been specifically developed.

Findings

The methodology is validated on a simple configuration (bended pipe with two parameters). Then, the process is applied on a full compound rotorcraft to minimize the flow distortion at the engine entry. The design of the experiment and the optimization loop act on seven design parameters of the air inlet and for each individual the evaluation is performed on two operation points, namely, cruise flight and hover case. Finally, the best design is analyzed and aerodynamic performances are compared with the initial design.

Originality/value

The adding value of the developed process is to deal with geometric integration conflicts addressed through a specific CAD module and the implementation of a penalty function method to manage the unsuccessful evaluation of any individual.

Details

International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, vol. 30 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0961-5539

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Johan C. Karremans, Mathieu Kacha, Jean-Luc Herrmann, Christophe Vermeulen and Olivier Corneille

The purpose of the present paper is to examine the effects of overconsumption on consumer evaluations of advertised brands. While the determinants and health consequences…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present paper is to examine the effects of overconsumption on consumer evaluations of advertised brands. While the determinants and health consequences of overconsumption have received considerable attention, the authors suggest that there are important marketing and advertising implications. Specifically, based on goal theory, the authors examined whether the aversive state of oversatiation is associated with more negative evaluations of advertised brands of the overconsumed product.

Design/methodology/approach

In three studies, oversatiation was measured or experimentally induced by having participants drink (too) much mineral water. Subsequently, participants watched advertisement of mineral water brands and control brands. Evaluations of the brands, buying intentions and estimates of future purchases of the advertised brands were measured.

Findings

Oversatiation negatively affected evaluations, buying intentions and estimates of future purchases of advertised mineral water brands. Importantly, a state of oversatiation did not affect evaluation of advertised brands not relevant to the overfulfilled goal.

Originality/value

Overconsumption of food and drinks can have detrimental health effects and results in large costs to society. While its health implications have received abundant scientific attention, little attention has been paid to the psychological consequences of the state of being oversatiated. Here, the authors show that the state of oversatiation (which might, for example, be very common during watching television commercials) can lead to particularly negative evaluations of advertised brands. As such, these findings have important marketing implications.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2021

Mathieu Seppey, Paul-André Somé and Valéry Ridde

A performance-based financing (PBF) pilot project was implemented in 2011 in Burkina Faso. After more than five years of implementation (data collection in 2016), the…

Abstract

Purpose

A performance-based financing (PBF) pilot project was implemented in 2011 in Burkina Faso. After more than five years of implementation (data collection in 2016), the project's sustainability was not guaranteed. This study's objective is to assess this project's sustainability in 2016 by identifying the presence/absence of different determinants of sustainability according to the conceptual framework of Seppey et al. (2017).

Design/methodology/approach

It uses a case study approach using in-depth interviews with various actors at the local, district/regional and national levels. Participants (n = 37) included health practitioners, management team members, implementers and senior members of health directions. A thematic analysis based on the conceptual framework was conducted, as well as an inductive analysis.

Findings

Results show the project's sustainability level was weak according to an unequal presence of sustainability's determinants; some activities are being maintained but not fully routinised. Discrepancies between the project and the context's values appeared to be important barriers towards sustainability. Project's ownership by key stakeholders also seemed superficial despite the implementers' leadership towards its success. The project's objective towards greater autonomy for health centres was also directly confronting the Burkinabe's hierarchical health system.

Originality/value

This study reveals many fits and misfits between a PBF project and its context affecting its ability to sustain activities through time. It also underlines the importance of using a conceptual framework in implementing and evaluating interventions. These results could be interesting for decision-makers and implementers in further assessing PBF projects elsewhere.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2020

Shuaib Ahmed Soomro, Olivier Roques and Akhtiar Ali

This study aims to investigate the impact of fear of terror (FOT) on employee organizational commitment (OC) working in terror-induced areas through examining the role of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the impact of fear of terror (FOT) on employee organizational commitment (OC) working in terror-induced areas through examining the role of rumination as a mediator and perceived organization support (POS) as a moderator.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors develop a model in which the mediating role of rumination in the FOT relationship is conditional to the values of OC. Using a sample size of 268 respondents, questionnaires were used to collect data from Pakistan during a period when terrorist attacks were at a peak. Results from the hierarchical regression analyses provided support for the developed model.

Findings

Overall, the statistical model is significant (p < 0.05); the authors found negative relationships between FOT and OC. The authors found that FOT positively led to rumination, which then negatively led to OC. It was also found that POS significantly moderated FOT and OC.

Practical implications

This study revealed that FOT is a deterring factor that changed employees’ OC. It further revealed that organizations providing support to employees working in terrorist-ridden areas showed positive commitment. This paper discusses the theoretical and practical implications of these findings.

Originality/value

This paper provides an examination of the relationship between FOT and employee OC. It expands our knowledge of the stress theory and terror management theory for employees working in discontinuous areas.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Jean-Luc Herrmann, Olivier Corneille, Christian Derbaix, Mathieu Kacha and Björn Walliser

This research seeks to examine the influence of sponsorship on spectators' consideration sets by investigating, in a naturalistic setting, whether sport sponsorship adds a…

Abstract

Purpose

This research seeks to examine the influence of sponsorship on spectators' consideration sets by investigating, in a naturalistic setting, whether sport sponsorship adds a prominent brand to spectators' consideration sets, with and without the explicit memory that the brand is a sponsor.

Design/methodology/approach

A field study involved 1,084 visitors to a tennis tournament. For the control group (n=276), the interviews took place before the spectators entered the stadium; interviews with the exposed group (n=808) were conducted after they had attended at least one match. Three hypotheses related to consumer status and consideration set conditions were tested.

Findings

Sponsorship can influence the likelihood that a prominent brand becomes part of the consideration set in a naturalistic setting, even without an explicit memory that the brand is a sponsor. This implicit sponsorship effect was limited to the memory-based consideration set of non-consumers of the brand.

Originality/value

This study establishes an implicit sponsorship effect for prominent brands in naturalistic environments and contributes to a better understanding of moderating (boundary) conditions.

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Olivier Droulers

The purpose of this paper is to draw a parallel between color combinations in coats of arms of the twelfth century and color combinations in current brand logotypes of 400…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw a parallel between color combinations in coats of arms of the twelfth century and color combinations in current brand logotypes of 400 companies from the Forbes Global 2000 list.

Design/methodology/approach

In this work, the frequency of color combinations displayed in medieval coats of arms and in the brand logotypes of the top 400 largest companies in the Forbes list were compared.

Findings

One of the main findings of this research is the stability of color usage in two visual identity systems – coats of arms and brand logotypes – although 800 years separate them. In these two identification systems, almost the same colors are preferred or rejected. Yet, even though it is regularly argued that color will submerge the consumption world, this research shows that, in the twenty-first century, visual identities of brands are rather less colorful than medieval coats of arms: nowadays, at a global level, half of the logotypes are formed with white combined with red and/or blue.

Originality/value

By drawing a parallel between two visual identification systems that are coats of arms and logotypes, the results from this study highlight the stability in color usage and color combinations along the centuries. Thus, it seems that modern analysis of color combination practices could greatly benefit from the history and historical evolution of coats of arms. Far from being out of date, the study of coats of arms can provide marketers with interesting insights about the rules and implementation of color combinations when designing logotypes.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 July 2014

Grant Samkin and Annika Schneider

The purpose of this paper is to examine the profiles of Australian, New Zealand and South African accounting faculty members. Additionally, the study investigates whether…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the profiles of Australian, New Zealand and South African accounting faculty members. Additionally, the study investigates whether there are any differences in research productivity of the accounting faculty between countries as measured by peer-reviewed academic journal output.

Design/methodology/approach

This archival study uses details obtained from webpages of Departments of Accounting in the three countries to construct a profile of accounting academics.

Findings

Significant differences in the profiles of accounting academics were found that can be attributed to the institutional factors that exist in each country. Staffs at the junior lecturer and lecturer levels are more likely to be female, while senior lecturers and professors in all three countries were more likely to be male. While Australia and New Zealand had a similar percentage of staff holding PhD or equivalent academic qualifications, only a small proportion of the South African faculty held PhD or equivalent qualifications. A greater proportion of the South African faculty was professionally qualified compared to their Australian and New Zealand counterparts. New Zealand accounting faculty was more productive than their Australian colleagues, with South African academics being the least productive. Academics holding a doctoral qualification or equivalent were more productive than those that did not.

Research limitations/implications

The research limitations relate to the use of websites as the primary data source. Incompleteness of information, inconsistencies in the type of information presented and a lack of comparability of information across institutions and countries may have led to some errors and omissions. However, given the relatively large sample size of 2,049 academics, this was not deemed to materially affect the final analysis.

Originality/value

The paper provides an important contribution to the literature on accounting academics. It is the first of its kind to present a comprehensive “snapshot” of the profiles of accounting academics at the universities in Australia, New Zealand and South Africa.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

Keywords

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