Search results

1 – 7 of 7
Article
Publication date: 21 December 2020

Marina Sayon, Luciana Florêncio de Almeida and Mateus Canniatti Ponchio

This paper aims to systematically review male cosmetics consumption (CC) literature and, given the dearth of research about the topic, especially on Western emerging…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to systematically review male cosmetics consumption (CC) literature and, given the dearth of research about the topic, especially on Western emerging country contexts, to shed light on the paradoxical behaviour concerning male grooming by empirically assessing the impact of some psychological and demographic antecedents of consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

Six hypotheses derived from a systematic review of the literature were tested through structured equation modelling (SEM), based on data of 476 Brazilian men.

Findings

The results empirically sustain the positive influence of vanity and masculinity in grooming product consumption, with partial mediation of vanity between masculinity and consumption. Counterintuitively, it also confirms the negative influence of income. Age and marital status are not statistically relevant.

Practical implications

Practitioners should invest in marketing actions focusing on low-income men, who showed genuine interest in grooming products, promoting them as powerful tools to improve appearance and social recognition. Additionally, educational and wellness-related campaigns could be effective.

Social implications

Beyond profitability, economic growth and men’s well-being, the results might affect the whole society through male cosmetics' contribution to blending gender paradigms.

Originality/value

This study focuses on an economically relevant segment that defies the status quo. It is the first to systematically demonstrate the state of the art of male CC knowledge and to illuminate the role of psychological and demographic variables in influencing CC, enriching the literature on appearance, gender and consumption.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 29 June 2021

Alexandre Alves dos Santos and Mateus Canniatti Ponchio

The present paper aims to understand the influence of consumer's functional, psychological and emotional barriers to the use of digital banking services.

2191

Abstract

Purpose

The present paper aims to understand the influence of consumer's functional, psychological and emotional barriers to the use of digital banking services.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors carried out a quantitative study in which data were collected through a self-administered online questionnaire. A final sample of 202 Brazilian adults, with and without experience in using digital banking services, enabled the test of research hypotheses by means of a structural equation modeling approach.

Findings

The authors found statistical evidence that supports the hypothesis that psychological barriers, emotional barriers and user experience positively influence the resistance to the use of digital banking services. However, there is no empirical evidence supporting that the influence of functional barriers affects the resistance to the use of digital banking services.

Practical implications

Efforts to understand the mechanisms that lead consumers to adopt or reject innovative products or services are important to prevent investments in these innovations, avoiding revenue failures. The results provide managerial implications by favoring the creation of communication programs capable of reducing the possibilities of innovation failure.

Originality/value

The main theoretical contribution of this work is the identification of the predominant influence of emotional barriers, in comparison to functional barriers, on the resistance to innovation in digital banking services. Currently, the models that illustrate resistance to innovation tend to focus solely on functional aspects; however, these models can be improved by incorporating emotional aspects.

Details

Innovation & Management Review, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2515-8961

Keywords

Abstract

Details

RAUSP Management Journal, vol. 56 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2531-0488

Article
Publication date: 17 May 2019

Fernando De Oliveira Santini, Wagner Junior Ladeira, Frederike Monika Budiner Mette and Mateus Canniatti Ponchio

The purpose of this paper is to determine the antecedents and consequences of financial literacy by using meta-analytic techniques.

2696

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the antecedents and consequences of financial literacy by using meta-analytic techniques.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a meta-analysis of 44 valid studies, which generated a total of 690 observations (effect sizes).

Findings

The findings showed that the factors influencing financial literacy were as follows: educational level, financial attitude, financial knowledge, financial behaviour, gender, household income and investments. The consequences of financial literacy were the behaviour of incurring avoidable credit and checking fees, credit score, and the willingness to take investment risks. The authors also find some methodological, cultural, economic and theoretical moderations effects between financial literacy and antecedent/consequent constructs.

Research limitations/implications

This meta-analysis reviewed the relationships found worldwide in the literature on financial literacy. The authors also identified new avenues for future research. Some specific limitations, such as the non-use of qualitative studies, are registered.

Originality/value

This research tested the impact of the antecedents, consequences and moderators of financial literacy via a meta-analytical review. This meta-analysis contributes to the marketing and financial literature by offering a set of empirical generalisations about the direct and moderation effects investigated.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 February 2019

Mateus Canniatti Ponchio, Rafaela Almeida Cordeiro and Virginia Nicolau Gonçalves

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of consumer spending self-control (CSSC), personal saving orientation (PSO), materialism, financial knowledge (FK) and…

1304

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of consumer spending self-control (CSSC), personal saving orientation (PSO), materialism, financial knowledge (FK) and time perspective (TP) on Brazilian consumers’ perceived financial well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual framework is provided to support the research hypotheses. A survey with 1,027 respondents allowed the research hypotheses to be tested by means of regression-based models.

Findings

The findings show that the two dimensions of financial well-being – current money management stress and future financial security – are predicted by CSSC, materialism and TP; PSO also predicts future financial security. TP moderates the effect of materialism on current money management stress, and CSSC mediates this relationship.

Research limitations/implications

The role of FK in predicting financial well-being is weakened in the presence of the psychological variables investigated, which has important implications for financial education efforts. The use of survey data alone limits the research findings, as the advocated causal relationships are based solely on theory; gathering experimental data to further support the findings is a possibility for future research.

Practical implications

Banks and other financial institutions can create tools to stimulate control of their customers’ day-to-day spending and try to show assertive projections to evidence the impact of their present actions on their financial future, enhancing personal awareness and promoting overall well-being.

Originality/value

The authors advance knowledge on the antecedents of financial well-being and offer two explanations involving moderating and mediating relationships that enhance the understanding of the individual differences that shape current money management stress.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2019

Cristiano A.B. Castro, Felipe Zambaldi and Mateus Canniatti Ponchio

This paper aims to conceptualize two dimensions of active innovation resistance (AIR): cognitive active resistance and emotional active resistance. A scale to measure this…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to conceptualize two dimensions of active innovation resistance (AIR): cognitive active resistance and emotional active resistance. A scale to measure this construct is proposed and tested.

Design/methodology/approach

Three studies were conducted, with sample sizes of 195, 190 and 186, to test the discriminant, convergent, nomological and criterion validity of the proposed AIRc+e scale and to analyze its explanatory and predictive power. Data were gathered using the online platform of a US-based research company.

Findings

The authors provide evidence that AIR is a two-dimension construct comprising a cognitive and an emotional dimension. AIR was modeled as a third-order construct, comprising two second-order constructs, cognitive active resistance and emotional active resistance. The impact of adding an emotion dimension to active resistance was therefore assessed, and the results indicated that the explanatory and predictive power of the AIR measure improved as expected.

Practical implications

Consumers are most likely to resist innovations launched onto the marketplace, either prior to or after evaluating them. A better understanding of the reasons behind their resistance to innovation, as well as of its mechanisms, is of great importance in decreasing an innovation’s chances of failure.

Originality/value

This study proposes that incorporating emotion into the assessment of AIR will result in a deeper understanding of adoption and rejection behavior, expanding the current knowledge of consumer behavior in innovation-related, new product adoption and decisions.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Rafaela Almeida Cordeiro, Mateus Canniatti Ponchio and José Afonso Mazzon

The purpose of this paper is to identify whether consumer evaluations of products are influenced by the presence of co-branding with a well-known reputable ingredient…

1304

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify whether consumer evaluations of products are influenced by the presence of co-branding with a well-known reputable ingredient brand and whether differences in evaluations are related to the socioeconomic stratum of the consumer.

Design/methodology/approach

These questions were investigated by way of two experiments: the first, using a between-subjects approach that was carried out with 210 subjects and the second, using between- and within-subjects approaches that were carried out with 305 subjects.

Findings

The results show that: products produced by both little-known and well-known brands are evaluated more favourably when they are co-branded with a well-known ingredient brand; there is no evidence that the co-branding effect on product evaluation is stronger for little-known brand products than for well-known brand products; and there is weak evidence that the co-branding effect on product evaluation is stronger among subjects from lower socioeconomic strata than among subjects from the upper stratum.

Research limitations/implications

The theory of anchoring alone is insufficient for explaining differences in product evaluations when the co-branding strategy is adopted. It is believed that positive effects can be also interpreted by the assimilation and signalling theories.

Practical implications

As for the managerial implications, the authors offer insights into the impacts of using a strategic co-branding alliance on the products of little-known brands among consumers from lower and upper strata.

Originality/value

The study contributes to consumer behaviour literature, specifically with regard to ingredient-brand effects in co-branding strategies from the perspective of the end consumer.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

1 – 7 of 7