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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Andrea Jones, Flis Henwood and Angie Hart

This paper examines the factors that made services more or less effective in using electronic patient record systems to produce clinical information for clinical audit and…

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1974

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the factors that made services more or less effective in using electronic patient record systems to produce clinical information for clinical audit and research.

Design/methodology/approach

Case studies of the use of electronic patient record systems in three maternity services in England, using qualitative research methods (semi‐structured interviews, observations and shadowing).

Findings

There were many contributing factors in each case site. The three main groups of determining factors were these: the resources devoted to, and acceptability to midwives of, the “IT midwife”; maternity managers prioritisation of information related matters; the relationship of maternity information systems with Trust‐wide systems.

Originality/value

Provides services with lists of factors they need to consider if they want to maximise the benefits realised for clinical audit and research from existing and new electronic patient record systems.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2008

Markella Rutherford and Selina Gallo-Cruz

Purpose – This chapter briefly outlines the history of childbirth in the United States and describes the influence of the natural birth movement and consumer demand in…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter briefly outlines the history of childbirth in the United States and describes the influence of the natural birth movement and consumer demand in shaping the contemporary advertising of mainstream maternity services.

Design/methodology/approach – Qualitative content analysis of 59 hospital websites was undertaken in order to understand how hospitals depict childbirth in their online advertising.

Findings – Our findings illustrate how contemporary medical institutions idealize childbirth through their depictions of its physical and social dimensions. Although hospital advertising has adopted some of the rhetoric of the natural birth movement in describing the social and symbolic dimensions of the childbirth experience, this rhetoric is shown to stand in tension to the highly rationalized and bureaucratic institutional nature of hospitals. These tensions are most apparent in advertised descriptions of the physical environment of maternity centers and in the attempt to depict hospitalized birth as an opportunity for the individual empowerment of women.

Research limitations/implications – This research is limited to an analysis of how providers advertise their services and does not provide data on whether practices actually reflect the rhetoric of the ideal birth. Future research should consider the fit between rhetoric and reality in hospital maternity practices in order to better understand the social structural constraints of delivering these services in a hospital maternity center.

Originality/value – This chapter highlights the importance of consumer demand for how maternity services are portrayed and identifies key tensions between an idealized image of birth and the rational, bureaucratic demands of modern medical institutions.

Details

Patients, Consumers and Civil Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-215-9

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2020

Martha Jane Paynter, M. Leslie Bagg and Clare Heggie

This paper aims to describe the process to create an inventory of the facilities in Canada designated to incarcerate women and girls, health service responsibility by…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the process to create an inventory of the facilities in Canada designated to incarcerate women and girls, health service responsibility by facility, facility proximity to hospitals with maternity services and residential programmes for mothers and children to stay together. This paper creates the inventory to support health researchers, prison rights advocates and policymakers to identify, analyse and respond to sex and gender differences in health and access to health services in prisons.

Design/methodology/approach

In spring 2019, this study conducted an environmental scan to create an inventory of every facility in Canada designated for the incarceration of girls and women, including remand/pretrial custody, immigration detention, youth facilities and for provincial and federal sentences.

Findings

There are 72 facilities in the inventory. In most, women are co-located with men. Responsibility for health varies by jurisdiction. Few sites have mother-child programmes. Distance to maternity services varies from 1 to 132 km.

Research limitations/implications

This paper did not include police lock-up, courthouse cells or involuntary psychiatric units in the inventory. Information is unavailable regarding trans and non-binary persons, a priority for future work. Access to maternity hospital services is but one critical question regarding reproductive care. Maintenance of the database is challenging.

Originality/value

Incarcerated women are an invisible population. The inventory is the first of its kind and is a useful tool to support sex and gender and health research across jurisdictions.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2009

Ioannis E. Chaniotakis and Constantine Lymperopoulos

This paper aims to study the effect of service quality (SQ) dimensions on satisfaction and word of mouth (WOM) for maternities in Greece.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the effect of service quality (SQ) dimensions on satisfaction and word of mouth (WOM) for maternities in Greece.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on Parasuraman et al.'s SERVQUAL variables, the authors tried to identify the effects of each variable to satisfaction and WOM. Data were collected through field research among 1,000 mothers who have given birth to a child during the last five years, and the data were analysed using SEM.

Findings

The results suggest that, in addition to “satisfaction”, the only service quality dimension that directly affects WOM, is “empathy”. In addition, “empathy” affects “responsiveness”, “assurance” and “tangibles” which in turn have only an indirect effect to WOM through “satisfaction”.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations relate to the use of a non‐probability sample and the restricted geographical area of the field research. This study contributes to the body of academic knowledge by shedding more light into the role of SQ dimensions, and especially “empathy”, in the WOM for maternities.

Practical implications

An understanding of the effect of SQ dimensions in satisfaction and WOM is important to maternities' marketing managers because it offers them the opportunity to take certain actions for improving customers' satisfaction and increase their intention to use positive WOM.

Originality/value

The paper manages to identify the effects of SQ dimensions on satisfaction and WOM, especially in the health care marketing sector.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2011

Magriet Holder and Adele Berndt

The aim of this research is to determine the effect of changes in servicescape on the service quality perceptions of maternity ward patients in a private hospital.

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3187

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this research is to determine the effect of changes in servicescape on the service quality perceptions of maternity ward patients in a private hospital.

Design/methodology/approach

A quasi‐experimental design was used. An experimental and control group (of patients) was surveyed before the changes in servicescape took place, and a further experimental and control group of patients was surveyed after changes in the servicescape. Each group was surveyed using a SERVPERF instrument to determine perceptions of service quality.

Findings

The changes in servicescape which took place in the experimental context resulted in a significant change in service quality perceptions among the experimental group. This change was not seen in all service quality dimensions, however, with statistical significance seen only in the tangible, reliability and responsiveness dimensions.

Research limitations/implications

Four different groups of respondents took part in the quasi‐experiment (two experimental groups and two control groups) specifically in a medical setting, and the ability to generalise these findings needs to be investigated.

Practical implications

Management needs to take greater notice of the effect of servicescape, as well as any changes in the servicescape on the perceptions of service quality.

Originality/value

There is agreement that the servicescape affects perceptions of service quality and this study bears out this conclusion.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

Julie Martin‐Hirsch and Gillian Wright

In a wider debate on defining and measuring quality in health care, there is a particular need for frameworks for understanding and managing quality in specific…

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1091

Abstract

In a wider debate on defining and measuring quality in health care, there is a particular need for frameworks for understanding and managing quality in specific specialties. This article addresses the definition and measurement of quality in maternity care. It develops a pro forma for monitoring and hence managing midwifery quality.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Myfanwy M. Davies and Peter A. Bath

Although the information needs of women receiving antenatal and postnatal care are well understood, few studies have examined the use of information by minority ethnic…

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2347

Abstract

Although the information needs of women receiving antenatal and postnatal care are well understood, few studies have examined the use of information by minority ethnic women. This paper describes a pilot study that aimed to identify the main maternity information sources used by Somali women living in a northern city in the UK. The study described here utilised unstructured exploratory focus group and semi‐structured interviews with Somali women. All discussions and interviews were audiotaped, translated and transcribed in their entirety and then analysed using a variation of the theme analysis method. Sources of information emerged as a sub‐theme from the data. Women sought and used information from several interpersonal sources. Many were dependent on general practitioners and health visitors for maternity information, although participants favoured community health forums addressed by health professionals. Women also sought maternity information from friends and neighbours. Interpersonal sources as a whole were viewed as having a number of advantages. Informal sources in particular were perceived as being approachable and providing a means through which further information could be sought, while each information source was also evaluated according to specific criteria. The implications of these findings for minority ethnic women are discussed and recommendations for further research are outlined.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 58 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2021

Laura Bridle, Sam Bassett and Sergio A. Silverio

Women with little-to-no English continue to have poor birth outcomes and low service user satisfaction. When language support services are used it enhances the…

Abstract

Purpose

Women with little-to-no English continue to have poor birth outcomes and low service user satisfaction. When language support services are used it enhances the relationship between the midwife and the woman, improves outcomes and ensures safer practice. However, this study has shown a reluctance to use professional interpreter services by midwives. This study aims to understand the experiences of midwives using language support services.

Design/methodology/approach

A maximum variation purposive sampling strategy was used to recruit midwives (N = 12) to a qualitative, semi-structured interview study. Data were analysed using thematic analysis.

Findings

Four themes were generated from the data analysis with a central organising concept of “Navigating Care Without Language”. These themes were: “Continuity as Key”, “Facilitating Tools”, “Networks of Support” and “Innovative Planning”. Each of these themes had between three and four sub-themes. It was found midwives are keen to support women with language barriers. However, support can be difficult due to the unavailability of equipment and resources; lack of continuity (of interpreter and midwife); inability to plan for the acute care of women who require interpreter services; and the system not being accessible enough to women who require language support services, thus causing them to fall through the net.

Originality/value

Continuity of carer appears to be a protective factor due to the flexibility, relationship and continuum of support. This study will aid the development of education for undergraduate, post-graduate and practising midwives. It will also inform policymakers working to improve the service offered to women who speak little-to-no English.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2013

Helen Tucker

– The purpose of this paper is to explore the presence and nature of integrated care in community hospitals.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the presence and nature of integrated care in community hospitals.

Design/methodology/approach

Staff reported their views and experiences of integrated care in 48 questionnaires for a Community Hospitals Association programme. An analytical framework was developed based on eight types of integration, and the community hospital services concerned were grouped into nine service categories.

Findings

Staff reported multiple types of integration, averaging four types (median), with a range of two to eight (of the eight types studied). The types of integration most frequently reported were multidisciplinary care, and community hospital/secondary care and community hospital/primary care. Integration with communities, patients and the third sector featured in many of the services. Integration with social care and local authorities were least frequently reported. Services with the highest number of types of integration (5+) included palliative care, maternity services and health promotion. Staff reported that commitment was a positive factor whilst a lack of staff resources hindered partnership working.

Research limitations/implications

Staff volunteered to be part of the programme which promoted good practice, and although the findings from the study cannot be generalised, they do contribute knowledge on key partnerships in local hospitals. Further research on the types, levels and outcomes of integrated care in a larger sample of community hospitals would build on this study and enable further exploration of partnership working.

Practical implications

The analytical framework developed for the study is being applied by staff and community groups as a tool to help assess appropriate partnership working and help identify the scope for further developing integrated care. The evidence of integrated working is available to inform those commissioning and providing community health services.

Originality/value

This study has shown that integrated working is present in community hospitals. This research provides new knowledge on the types of integrated care present in a range of community hospital services. The study shows a tradition of joint working, the presence of multiple simultaneous types of integration and demonstrated that integrated care can be provided in a range of services to patients of all ages in local communities.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Sue Vaux Halliday

This paper sheds light on how trust works in professional services encounters. Service delivery often takes place over time and this has led to a focus upon relationships…

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2759

Abstract

This paper sheds light on how trust works in professional services encounters. Service delivery often takes place over time and this has led to a focus upon relationships developed during the cycle of service creation. One facet of a relationship is the need for trust to be present. This paper briefly reviews different understandings of trust across several strands of management literature and conceptualizes a novel distinction between the initiatory act of trusting (“placed trust”) and the response of trusting. This conceptualization is then applied to theory on the service encounter, and empirically demonstrated in the context of health care. The answers enable services management from a range of professional services settings, to map out routes for maintaining trust, creating trust and developing commitment.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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