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1 – 10 of over 75000
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1983

Barbara B. Moran

Although interest in the study of popular culture on the university and college level has increased greatly since the 1960s, there has been little written to date about…

Abstract

Although interest in the study of popular culture on the university and college level has increased greatly since the 1960s, there has been little written to date about collection development in this field. What has been written has typically described the collection development activities in particular academic libraries instead of attempting to address the topic generally. The lack of general guidelines for collection building in this area of study is not surprising. In the first place, popular culture is a relative newcomer to the academic scene with most programs and courses instituted in the last decade. Secondly, popular culture is a broad, diverse field of study with its researchers typically scattered throughout many of the more traditional departments of the university. As a result, the demands on the library have been less focused than if they had been coming from one clearly defined academic department.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Judith Overmier and Rhonda Harris Taylor

Introduces librarians to popular culture studies and emphasizes the importance of collection development of popular culture materials, both primary and secondary. Provides…

Abstract

Introduces librarians to popular culture studies and emphasizes the importance of collection development of popular culture materials, both primary and secondary. Provides strategies and identifies resources that can facilitate such collection development.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Kathryn L. Ness Swanson

This chapter explores ways to think about historical “stuff” and how to use objects to create a rich presentation and understanding of both time periods and historical…

Abstract

This chapter explores ways to think about historical “stuff” and how to use objects to create a rich presentation and understanding of both time periods and historical figures. Items can help “set the stage” while also offering insight into subtle details about specific people, like their tastes and movements and whether they were right- or left-handed. These details help make the past come alive and provide avenues for people to make deep personal connections with historical events and figures. For teachers, objects can enrich their lessons by literally setting the stage with the items that witnessed historical activities and periods. Their students, on the other hand, might find that objects can help turn abstract historical events and figures into tangible happenings and people. This chapter discusses material culture studies and ways to interrogate objects before examining how objects can help inform interpretation.

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Anna Marie Guerra

For centuries, the Hispanic population has been proving itself as an emerging majority in the United States. The United States census shows that the Hispanic population…

Abstract

For centuries, the Hispanic population has been proving itself as an emerging majority in the United States. The United States census shows that the Hispanic population more than doubled from 1970 to 1980 and from 1980 to 1990. However, despite these data, libraries have not adapted their library services to meet the needs of this population, despite their knowledge that Hispanics do not feel welcome in libraries. Authors from 1970 to 2001 have highlighted the long-standing problem of Hispanic under-utilization of libraries and have provided recommendations for the library community regarding adapting their services in a culturally sensitive manner. Despite these publications, there is still literature in 2001 reporting that Hispanics do not feel welcome in libraries. The purpose of this study is to examine the current status of three facets of librarianship: (1) outreach efforts to Hispanics; (2) specialized training for Hispanics in bibliographic and information literacy; and (3) current attitudes of Hispanics toward public libraries.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1410-2

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

Richard L. Brinkman and Georgy Bovt

Analyses and clarifies the concept of federalism outside such limitedparadigmatic boundaries and includes the relevant social and economicvariables. Applies a holistic and…

Abstract

Analyses and clarifies the concept of federalism outside such limited paradigmatic boundaries and includes the relevant social and economic variables. Applies a holistic and interdisciplinary methodology in the framework of the processes of general culture evolution to interrelate the social, the political and the economic. Compares the West European experiences and the US prototype, to that of the current movement towards an evolving Russian federation. Analyses the apparent positive and centripetal movement towards West European federalism, in the context of the European Union, juxtoposed to the centrifrugal forces evident in the collapse of the USSR. Analyses the current movement towards a Russian federation.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 21 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 January 2009

Anne‐Françoise Gilbert

The paper raises the question of a persisting masculine dominance in engineering disciplines and the reasons behind it. Rather than addressing gender‐specific…

1032

Abstract

Purpose

The paper raises the question of a persisting masculine dominance in engineering disciplines and the reasons behind it. Rather than addressing gender‐specific socialisation as a cause of the under‐representation of women in engineering education, it aims to focus on the social and cultural practices of engineering itself, asking to what extent these practices are gendered and/or gendering.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on ethnographic fieldwork carried out in two departments at a technical university in Switzerland: mechanical engineering and materials science. An exemplary piece of field data is analysed in order to generate relevant concepts for characterising and contrasting cultures in engineering disciplines. Results are discussed in the framework of Bourdieu's theory of the scientific field.

Findings

Group culture in materials science values individuality and plurality, hence leaving more scope for gender diversity; group culture in mechanical engineering values the subordination of individual needs to group norms and tends to reproduce features of homosocial male worlds. The results support the hypothesis that disciplinary cultures in engineering are gendered and have a gendering effect of their own.

Research limitations/implications

Case studies in other disciplines and national contexts are needed to broaden the empirical basis of the argument.

Practical implications

Policies to achieve gender balance in higher education should not only aim at supporting women, but also at changing disciplinary cultures.

Originality/value

The paper presents a shift of focus from women's socialisation to gendering practices in engineering disciplines.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Richard L. Brinkman and June E. Brinkman

Sets out to review the points for and against the concept of cultural lag. First clarifies the cultural lag concept and theory. Addresses the issue of empirical…

3291

Abstract

Sets out to review the points for and against the concept of cultural lag. First clarifies the cultural lag concept and theory. Addresses the issue of empirical verification, and discusses the relevance of the concept and theory of cultural lag to socioeconomic policy.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1999

Richard L. Brinkman

This paper analyzes and explains the dynamics of corporate evolution in the context of anthropologist conception of culture. The multinational corporate characterizing the…

8996

Abstract

This paper analyzes and explains the dynamics of corporate evolution in the context of anthropologist conception of culture. The multinational corporate characterizing the Galbraithian world, as The New Industrial State, dominates the current economic landscape. The conception of corporate culture and its dynamics lays bare the locus of corporate power which resides in the control of corporate technology. Granting this dynamic, the question then arises concerning the agency which controls the application and use of this cumulated corporate power. Corporate power and policy in the USA are currently directed by a social institution in the form of profits without social responsibility. This policy is manifest in a “low road” of cost reduction. Such a policy direction exacerbates rather than ameliorates the current economic malaise now characterizing the US economy.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Richard L. Brinkman and Georgy Bovt

Demonstrates the relevance of a stages methodology as a basis forunderstanding and analysing the evolutionary metamorphosis leading tothe current Russian malaise

Abstract

Demonstrates the relevance of a stages methodology as a basis for understanding and analysing the evolutionary metamorphosis leading to the current Russian malaise. Addresses the advantages and disadvantages of the methodology, such as the unilinear fallacy, and analyses economic stagnation and decline in the context of the dynamics of culture evolution in the stage of modern economic growth. Given the Kuznetsian emphasis on a science‐fed technology, how then to explain the lack of Russian permeability to that technological flow? Many variables, such as excessive military spending, nationalism, rigid centralization, ideology, and so on, enter into such an analytical purview. It appears that neither tsarist nor Soviet Russia was able to create a culture adequately permeable to the dynamics of an ongoing science‐fed technological flow. The basic problem for Russia to overcome today is one of a cultural lag. A greater democratization of social and economic organization, concomitant with the needs of a modern industrial society, appears in order.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 21 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Richard L. Brinkman and June E. Brinkman

To overcome the errors of the exogenous growth theories of the past, the new growth theories, currently in vogue, attempt to incorporate technological change as endogenous…

2030

Abstract

To overcome the errors of the exogenous growth theories of the past, the new growth theories, currently in vogue, attempt to incorporate technological change as endogenous to the growth process. While making a commendable effort to see into that black box of technological change, these so‐called new growth theories are also subject to question and critique on a variety of grounds. One of these is that the new growth theories are not really that new. Another area of concern relates to their empirical relevancy. This is especially evident in assessing the practical use of the new growth theories in terms of problem identification and policy resolution. Other problem areas relate to issues of conceptual clarity and underlying assumptions. By assuming the process of economic growth to be synonymous with that of economic development the result is to avoid the prerequisite structural transformation inherent in the dynamics of culture evolution. Culture evolution in turn is predicated upon technological advance conceptualized as both material and social technology. It is argued in this paper that an explanation as to why technology is endogenous to the processes of growth and economic development is best served vis‐à‐vis an analysis of the dynamics of culture evolution.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 28 no. 5/6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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