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Book part
Publication date: 5 January 2015

C. Andrew Lafond and Kristin Wentzel

The subject area of the assignment is cost accumulation. This instructional tool enhances coverage of cost accumulation topics in graduate level Introductory to Management

Abstract

Purpose

The subject area of the assignment is cost accumulation. This instructional tool enhances coverage of cost accumulation topics in graduate level Introductory to Management Accounting courses.

Methodology/approach

The assignment entails visiting a small business and interviewing the owner to learn about the company’s process for determining costs of products and/or services. Such active learning hones leadership and critical thinking skills by requiring students to employ interviewing and listening techniques as they act as business advisors to discuss cost accumulation processes with small business owners. The assignment provides flexibility since a range of business types can be used from a landscaping business operated out of one’s garage to a mid-size manufacturing company.

Findings

Students see how a small business accumulates costs and gain experience analyzing the effectiveness of cost accumulation systems and providing recommendations.

Practical implications

A list of supplementary materials is included, covering teaching notes, assessment data, and grading rubrics.

Originality/value

Student feedback suggests that students value the opportunity to engage in a realistic exercise that allows them to draw linkages between textbook material and the real world, while also acting in a consulting role to apply class concepts to small businesses. Furthermore, assessment data based on grading rubrics indicate that all students meet or exceed instructor expectations, thus increasing the viable use of this course project.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-587-7

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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2019

Danielle R. Leek and Carl J. Brown

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to assess the avenues through which traditional notions of information literacy skills shape oral communication curriculum and to…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to assess the avenues through which traditional notions of information literacy skills shape oral communication curriculum and to identify steps that can be taken to transform the experience of students in the public speaking classroom so that they are offered an opportunity to develop understandings of how they use information to learn.

Approach – This chapter engages in an analysis of teaching materials and best practice scholarship used in the traditional college public speaking classroom. An informed learning perspective is applied to this corpus to identify the ways in which an information literacy skills approach is reflected in current practice.

Findings – The analysis highlights the prevalence of an information literacy skills approach throughout the oral communication curriculum. Textbooks, assignment types and guidelines, along with grading rubrics and instructor feedback all perpetuate a skills approach. Outside class support, including peer tutors and library instruction, also contribute to a focus on information literacy over informed learning.

Implications – Informed learners are better prepared to engage and apply information across contexts and to use information to continue learning. Informed learners are reflective on the knowledge they gain through information use. Therefore, this chapter concludes that public speaking courses, along with the communication centers and libraries that support oral communication instruction, should embrace an informed learning approach to the development of course materials, assignments, and teaching.

Originality/value – Suggestions for reframing public speaking curriculum and support from the informed learning perspective are provided.

Details

Informed Learning Applications: Insights from Research and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-062-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1981

Jeffrey G. Miller, Peter Gilmour and Roland Van Dierdonck

It is now quite widely accepted that there are benefits to be derived from an integrated management perspective of the flows of purchased parts, components and raw…

Abstract

It is now quite widely accepted that there are benefits to be derived from an integrated management perspective of the flows of purchased parts, components and raw materials from suppliers into and through manufacturing facilities, and of finished products through distribution channels to final consumers. There is, however, far less agreement on how an organisation should marshal its resources to actually derive these benefits. Many options exist: the use of computer‐based systems and management information support; the use of analytical tools to help evaluate decision alternatives adjusting the materials and logistics environment to facilitate the exchange between the organisation and its suppliers and the organisation and its customers; establishing more efficient communication networks and coordination methods for interfunctional information exchange; altering the organisational structure to facilitate the administration of materials functions.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 30 June 2020

Lesego Makhafola and Martie J. Van Deventer

The purpose of this study was to understand what role undergraduate third- and fourth-year students expect librarians to play in an online learning environment and to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to understand what role undergraduate third- and fourth-year students expect librarians to play in an online learning environment and to determine what information products, training and other services the students expected librarians to embed.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study used a convergent parallel mixed methods design. Data were collected from both students and lecturers. An online questionnaire was used to collect mainly quantitative data from the undergraduates while a semi-structured interview schedule was used for in-depth discussions with lecturers.

Findings

Contrary to what was expected, engineering students regarded access to an embedded librarian as important. Lecturers prefer that a separate, mandatory module is created and embedded in the learning environment. Product and service expectations were not surprising, but there are gaps to fill when it comes to training needs.

Research limitations/implications

The research sample was small and therefore generalizations are not advisable.

Originality/value

The research holds value to stakeholders involved in the teaching and learning of engineering subjects. Librarians embarking on the process of embedding their services online should also find the results useful.

Details

Library Management, vol. 41 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Jennifer Lee and Don MacMillan

Much debate in the library literature has focused on the effectiveness of web‐based or online instruction versus traditional face‐to‐face library instruction. While both…

Abstract

Much debate in the library literature has focused on the effectiveness of web‐based or online instruction versus traditional face‐to‐face library instruction. While both forms of library instruction have their strengths and weaknesses, the authors contend that a hybrid approach to information literacy instruction, by bringing the web into the classroom, offers students and instructors the greatest benefit. The authors' experience with the evolution of instruction sessions for 1,100 first‐year biology students from PowerPoint presentations to web‐based courseware (WebCT) to its current web‐based format illustrates the improvements to instruction that have accrued as the program has developed. These include the ability to address diverse learning styles, encourage active participation, provide 24/7 access, and foster increased student contact with librarians.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 26 October 2015

Karen Hammerness and Kirsti Klette

In the United States, policy discussions of teacher education in relationship to teacher quality have tended to focus more closely around debates about the nature of…

Abstract

In the United States, policy discussions of teacher education in relationship to teacher quality have tended to focus more closely around debates about the nature of teacher preparation and the need for quality teachers to possess advanced degrees or certification. The field is in need of an array of indicators – a set of powerful, well-researched indicators that can be applied to large public universities as well as small regional private colleges, from university-based programs to “alternative” programs and to more “hybrid” programs. These indicators need to be relevant for teacher certification across a variety of age-ranges and developmental stages. In this chapter, we build on a growing conversation about practice in teacher education and efforts on the part of researchers to identify key features of powerful teacher education. We propose that quality teacher education is designed around a clear and shared vision of good teaching; it is coherent in that it links theory with practice and offers opportunities to learn that are aligned with the vision of good teaching; and it offers opportunities to enact teaching. While these features are supported for the most part by growing consensus in the literature (National Research Council, 2010; NCATE, 2010), there is also an emerging empirical base that provides support for the value of these features as well.

Details

Promoting and Sustaining a Quality Teacher Workforce
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-016-2

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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Mohanbir Sawhney and Pallavi Goodman

PageWell, an e-reading platform provider, was preparing to launch PageWell 2.0 to the larger full-time MBA student market after a successful trial of PageWell 1.0 in…

Abstract

PageWell, an e-reading platform provider, was preparing to launch PageWell 2.0 to the larger full-time MBA student market after a successful trial of PageWell 1.0 in Executive MBA (EMBA) classes at the Kellogg School of Management. Research had shown that full-time MBA students would be very interested in using products that allowed electronic access to course materials everywhere and across many platforms and that allowed electronic note-taking and storage. To better understand this user group, PageWell conducted a market research survey of students, faculty, and administrators to gauge their needs, preferences, and potential interest in the PageWell product. The study revealed that MBA student usage patterns, scenarios, and behavior varied significantly from EMBA student needs and perceptions. PageWell now had the task of prioritizing the product requirements and recalibrating the market requirements document to more accurately reflect student needs and thus create a viable product

After students have analyzed the case, they will be able to:

  • Use customer feedback to help define requirements for a new product

  • Understand the role of personas and scenarios in defining requirements

  • Understand how to use scenarios and scenario templates to derive scenario implementation requirements

  • Understand how to prioritize scenarios based on customer, company, and competitive criteria

  • Write a market requirements document for a next-version technology produc

Use customer feedback to help define requirements for a new product

Understand the role of personas and scenarios in defining requirements

Understand how to use scenarios and scenario templates to derive scenario implementation requirements

Understand how to prioritize scenarios based on customer, company, and competitive criteria

Write a market requirements document for a next-version technology produc

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Sultan M. Al‐Daihani

The purpose of this paper is to explore students' perceptions and views of the instructors, in relation to information and communications technology (ICT) education in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore students' perceptions and views of the instructors, in relation to information and communications technology (ICT) education in library and information science (LIS) programs.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was carried out among students from the two LIS departments in Kuwait. A focus group was conducted with faculty members of the two institutions, who provided qualitative input about the instruction of ICT, needed changes, and relevance of market needs.

Findings

Participants showed dissatisfaction with the currently available ICT courses in the LIS programs. Students pointed out deficiencies and inadequacies in ICT resources and facilities, and suggested upgrading software and hardware. They appeared to be satisfied with the ICT skills being targeted by LIS programs. They also appeared to be satisfied with the ICT instructors. The study pointed out a need for collaboration with professional forums for continuing education programs and the need for revisions in curricula to introduce more focused courses that meet the needs of the ever‐changing market requirements and give the students access to professional bilingual materials. The faculty members noted the demands of the job market and proposed measures for addressing them through enhanced course content and improved opportunities for hands‐on instruction.

Originality/value

Earlier studies reported in the literature have discussed ICT education in broader terms. This study reports the situation of ICT education in IS programs in Kuwait, focusing on specific areas such as resource, curricula, and instructors.

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

G.D. Moss

The study reports the views of Parcelforce managers who areundertaking training programmes using distance learning strategies. Theprogrammes of study are well received by…

Abstract

The study reports the views of Parcelforce managers who are undertaking training programmes using distance learning strategies. The programmes of study are well received by all of the managers and a majority of them indicate their preference for such a training strategy. There is a suggestion that some managerial groups may have more difficulty than others in organising their study programmes and most managers have some difficulty in organising their study time. The tutorial elements of the distance education programmes are found to be especially useful and many managers would like these to be extended. Suggestions are made for ways of overcoming the problems and reservations of such learners while still retaining the benefits of the distance‐learning model

Details

Education + Training, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Book part
Publication date: 3 June 2008

Solveig-Alma Halaas Lyster and Siri Wormnæs

One of the challenges in educating teachers about inclusion, be it pre-service or in-service, is influencing the student's preconceptions and perspectives so that their…

Abstract

One of the challenges in educating teachers about inclusion, be it pre-service or in-service, is influencing the student's preconceptions and perspectives so that their newly acquired knowledge will guide their actions in the classroom. A DVD entitled Teachers for All, consisting of 40–50 video sequences recorded in Uganda and Kenya, each followed by discussion questions, has been produced to help meet this challenge. Lecturers at the Department of Special Needs Education at The University of Oslo, in collaboration with our partners in Uganda and Kenya, have been involved in the development of the content of the video recordings. The material has been tested at teacher education institutions in Uganda, Kenya and Norway. The topic of the material is the inclusive classroom, focusing on learners with special needs and on the teaching of reading. Video recordings of a total of 59 students’ reflections and discussions and also information from their reflective notes, were transcribed and analysed. The project results show that the DVD material is promising; it is user-friendly providing students with new outlooks about teaching and learning. Results of the study indicate that video sequences have the potential to be used in training students to observe significant details for implementing inclusive education.

Details

Personnel Preparation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-59749-274-4

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