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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2018

Masud Chand

The countries that make up South Asia have young but rapidly aging populations. The purpose of this paper is to investigate some of the challenges that this rapid aging…

1518

Abstract

Purpose

The countries that make up South Asia have young but rapidly aging populations. The purpose of this paper is to investigate some of the challenges that this rapid aging creates for societies and organizations in South Asia. It also points out how, properly managed, aging populations can create multiple opportunities for societies and organizations alike.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses secondary data about the aging situation globally. It pays special attention to the demographic situation in South Asian countries and uses as examples policies dealing with aging populations in other countries that have gone through demographic transitions in the recent past.

Findings

Aging populations are bringing about numerous challenges in the region, including rising costs for pensions and healthcare, higher dependency ratios, and changing family dynamics. South Asia will enjoy a one-time demographic dividend. Policy makers and managers need to put the right policies in place to ensure that they take maximum advantage of this opportunity.

Research limitations/implications

The study is based on secondary data. It is a perspectives piece and does not provide an in-depth study of the specific issues raised.

Practical implications

The study details how organizations can best manage this transition. This includes planning for a multigenerational workforce, providing accommodations for older workers, and fostering mentoring, knowledge transfer, cross-training and mixed-age work teams.

Social implications

This study analyzes some of the social issues that arise because of aging populations, such as the challenge of creating pension and healthcare systems, dealing with a rising old age dependency ratio, and dealing with a gradual transition to single-family households.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies that look at the coming demographic transition in South Asia, and details some of the challenges and opportunities that arise both in terms of policies and managerial implications.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

179

Abstract

Details

South Asian Journal of Global Business Research, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-4457

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Masud Chand

220

Abstract

Details

South Asian Journal of Global Business Research, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-4457

Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Masud Chand

The purpose of this paper is to explore the potential regional preferences of the diaspora and explain how such preferences affect their decision when engaging in reverse…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the potential regional preferences of the diaspora and explain how such preferences affect their decision when engaging in reverse Foreign Direct Investment (FDI). Since diasporas often act as conduits for trade and investment, the author is interested in whether these regional preferences affect their choice of destination for FDI.

Design/methodology/approach

The author developed and pre-tested a questionnaire that was administered in pen and paper as well as online. Totally, 158 professional, managers and entrepreneurs with Indian diasporic background in the USA and Canada participated in the study. Follow-up interviews were conducted with 25 participants.

Findings

Participants indicated that they did not favor their region of origin over the entire country. However, most of the participants only invested in their region of origin.

Research limitations/implications

Interviews were based on the original survey questionnaire and did not further probe other issues. The current study should be treated as exploratory in nature and the results should be used as a springboard for future research.

Practical implications

It would seem that the region of origin was important in the decision to migrate and for reverse FDI, even though cognitively the participants did not recognize it to the same extent. This might point to a mediation effect, which should be investigated in future studies. This paper helps businesses and governments understand the extent to which sub-national regional ties explain the investment motivations of people investing back in their home countries.

Social implications

Furthermore, the importance of regional ties in the decisions to both invest and migrate point to the importance of studying sub-national cultural and institutional issues rather than treating large multicultural countries such as India as a monolithic bloc.

Originality/value

The author used network ties theories to investigate and explain the investment behavior of Indian diaspora. While other disciplines (e.g. geography, sociology and economics) might have studied similar phenomena, the author looked and expanded the knowledge from a management perspective.

Details

South Asian Journal of Global Business Research, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-4457

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 October 2012

Masud Chand

The purpose of this paper is to study the migration of the Indian diaspora to Canada and the USA and its role in fostering trade and investment between them using its…

1104

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the migration of the Indian diaspora to Canada and the USA and its role in fostering trade and investment between them using its transnational social networks.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was based on interviews with 25 Indian immigrants, 13 in Canada and 12 in the USA.

Findings

The social networks that immigrants had in both their country of residence (COR) and country of origin (COO) act as conduits of trade and investment between the two. The Indian diaspora further facilitates economic engagement between the COO and COR by running cross‐border businesses, introducing Indian products and brands in the COR, introducing the Indian culture and helping non‐Indians to invest in India. Within the COO, the diaspora's social networks often helped Indians in India connect with markets, suppliers and potential business partners in the COR.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size was 25 people and was restricted to managers, executives and entrepreneurs of Indian origin, since it was assumed that these people are the most likely to drive trade and investment between the COO and COR.

Practical implications

For policy makers in COOs, the paper stresses the importance of maintaining social and economic ties to the diaspora, who can often bring important trade and investment related benefits to the COO. For CORs, the paper reveals the importance of utilizing the transnational networks that the diaspora possess, that can be beneficial for the COR companies in entering new markets. Leveraging both the human and social capital of the diaspora in a mutually beneficial way is one of the biggest challenges for policy makers in both the COO and the COR.

Social implications

The paper shows that within the COR, the local Indian community provides social and moral, rather than financial support to newly arrived Indian immigrants.

Originality/value

The paper explains the linkage between diasporas, trade and migration by focusing on the reasons for diaspora immigration, the social networks that the diaspora has, and the diaspora activities in the COR. It contributes to the literature on social networks by pointing out the importance of the diaspora's transnational social networks in both the COR and COO in driving trade and investment between them. It also adds to the brain circulation literature through its finding that pull factors, rather than push factors, were responsible for the vast majority of Indian immigration to the USA and Canada, and that by making diaspora‐friendly policies, brain circulation will be made easier, and this can help both the COO and COR in the long run.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 2 September 2010

Masud Chand

Diasporas can play a vital role in enhancing a country's international competitiveness. They can act as catalysts to enhance human capital development in their country of…

Abstract

Diasporas can play a vital role in enhancing a country's international competitiveness. They can act as catalysts to enhance human capital development in their country of origin (COO), use their transnational social networks in both the COO and country of residence (COR) as conduits for trade and investment, introduce COO culture and products in the COR, enhance the COO's soft power and use their social networks to favourably affect the COO effect. In this paper, we examine the vital roles that modern diasporas play, as well as the issues that have led to their increasing importance. These issues are illustrated by looking at the experiences of two of the largest modern diasporas, the Chinese and Indian diasporas. The paper concludes by examining some of the emerging issues for diasporas in the fast changing current global environment, and discusses some of their implications for the diasporas themselves, their COOs and their CORs.

Details

The Past, Present and Future of International Business & Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-085-9

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Abstract

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 2 September 2010

Abstract

Details

The Past, Present and Future of International Business & Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-085-9

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2013

Shaista E. Khilji

The purpose of this article is to offer a recap of the past two years at SAJGBR in terms of its submissions, outline SAJGBR publication criteria and discuss the Editor's…

193

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to offer a recap of the past two years at SAJGBR in terms of its submissions, outline SAJGBR publication criteria and discuss the Editor's future goals with respect to solidifying its reputation as a high‐quality regional journal with a global impact.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the past two years, explains the SAJGBR publication process and criteria, and discusses the Editor's goals and how they will be achieved.

Findings

SAJGBR is unique with respect to its focus upon a neglected (but socio‐economically vibrant) region and span across the full spectrum of business discipline. In its two volumes and four issues, it has made significant contributions to creating a repository of knowledge of South Asian business issues, and integrating South Asian perspectives and approaches to international business literatures.

Originality/value

The paper reviews the past two years, explains the SAJGBR publication process and criteria, and discusses the Editor's goals and how to achieve them. The Editor makes a plea to all researchers to select South Asia as the context of their studies; and to all authors to undertake rigorous research and carefully evaluate their manuscripts in terms of contribution, attention to context and quality before submitting to SAJGBR.

Details

South Asian Journal of Global Business Research, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-4457

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 2 September 2010

Abstract

Details

The Past, Present and Future of International Business & Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-085-9

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