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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Parbudyal Singh, Ronald J. Burke and Janet Boekhorst

A growing body of research suggests that psychological experiences related to recovery after work may reduce employee fatigue and exhaustion and improve well-being. The…

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Abstract

Purpose

A growing body of research suggests that psychological experiences related to recovery after work may reduce employee fatigue and exhaustion and improve well-being. The purpose of this paper is to extend this literature by examining several correlates and consequences of four recovery experiences: psychological detachment, relaxation, mastery, and control.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 290 nursing staff working in hospitals using a questionnaire study and well-established measures. Hierarchical regression analyses were used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results suggest that the four recovery experiences were, with one exception, positively and significantly correlated. Personal demographic variables (e.g. work status and level of education) had relationships with the use of particular recovery experiences. Passion was positively related to the use of mastery and control, while work intensity was negatively associated with the use of psychological detachment and relaxation. The use of particular recovery experiences was generally associated with lower intentions to quit and positive indicators of psychological well-being.

Research limitations/implications

There are several implications for research and practice. Scholars can use the results to extend the theories such as the job demands-resources model, including the role of work intensity as job demands. At the organizational level, managers and leaders should consider supporting strategies that help employees recover after work.

Originality/value

This study extends the empirical research on recovery after work using some variables not previously used. The theory on recovery after work is also extended.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 May 2009

Ronald J. Burke, Mustafa Koyuncu and Lisa Fiksenbaum

A body of research evidence has shown that job stressors are associated with lower levels of satisfaction and psychological well‐being. It has been suggested that recovery…

378

Abstract

Purpose

A body of research evidence has shown that job stressors are associated with lower levels of satisfaction and psychological well‐being. It has been suggested that recovery after the work day may reduce fatigue, restore mood and improve well‐being. The purpose of this paper is to examine predictors and consequences of four recovery experiences (psychological detachment, relaxation, mastery, and control) identified by Sonnentag and Fritz, to replicate and extend their work.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 887 men and women managers and professionals working in the manufacturing sector in Turkey using anonymously completed questionnaires (a 58 percent response rate).

Findings

Respondents at higher organizational levels made more use of both mastery and control. Personality factors (need for achievement and workaholism components) were also positively correlated with use of mastery and control. Hierarchical regression analyses controlling both personal demographic and work situation characteristics showed generally positive relationships with use of recovery experiences and more favorable work and well‐being outcomes. Psychological detachment, however, was found to have negative relationships with some of these outcomes suggesting more complex relationships with use of this recovery experience.

Research limitations/implications

Questions of causality cannot be addressed since data were collected at only one point in time.

Practical implications

Individuals, through practice, and organizations, through training efforts, can encourage employees to practice recovery while off the job to improve their work satisfaction and individual well‐being.

Originality/value

The paper presents the first study of recovery experiences in Turkey.

Details

Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-7983

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 August 2019

Hussain Alshahrani and Diane Rasmussen Pennington

The purpose of this paper is to investigate sources of self-efficacy for researchers and the sources’ impact on the researchers’ use of social media for knowledge sharing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate sources of self-efficacy for researchers and the sources’ impact on the researchers’ use of social media for knowledge sharing. It is a continuation of a larger study (Alshahrani and Rasmussen Pennington, 2018).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors distributed an online questionnaire to researchers at the University of Strathclyde (n=144) and analysed the responses using descriptive statistics.

Findings

Participants relied on personal mastery experience, vicarious experience, verbal persuasion and emotional arousal for social media use. These elements of self-efficacy mostly led them to use it effectively, with a few exceptions.

Research limitations/implications

The convenience sample utilised for this study, which included academic staff, researchers and PhD students at one university, is small and may not be entirely representative of the larger population.

Practical implications

This study contributes to the existing literature on social media and knowledge sharing. It can help researchers understand how they can develop their self-efficacy and its sources in order to enhance their online professional presence. Additionally, academic institutions can use these results to inform how they can best encourage and support their researchers in improving their professional social media use.

Originality/value

Researchers do rely on their self-efficacy and its sources to use social media for knowledge sharing. These results can help researchers and their institutions eliminate barriers and improve online engagement with colleagues, students, the public and other relevant research stakeholders.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 76 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 June 2020

Esther Dzidzah, Kwame Owusu Kwateng and Benjamin Kofi Asante

The inception of mobile financial services (MFSs) has positively provoked economic growth and productivity, nonetheless, it has pessimistically caused an upward surge in…

Abstract

Purpose

The inception of mobile financial services (MFSs) has positively provoked economic growth and productivity, nonetheless, it has pessimistically caused an upward surge in cybersecurity threat. Customers are progressively becoming conscious of some of the threat and several of them now shun away from some suspicious activities over the internet as a form of protection. This study aims to explore the factors that influence users’ to adopt security behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

A synthesis of theories – Self-efficacy and technology threat avoidance theories – was used to examine the security behaviour of users of MFSs. Data was gathered from 530 students in Ghana using convenience sampling technique. Data analysis was carried out using descriptive statistics, inferential statistics and structural equation model.

Findings

Outcome of the investigation indicate that both mastery experience and verbal persuasion have substantial effect on the avoidance motivation of MFSs users. It was, however, found that emotional state and vicarious experience of users do not influence their avoidance motivation. Also, it was established that avoidance motivation is a positive prognosticator of avoidance behaviour.

Practical implications

Understanding the security behaviour of MFS users will help the operators to outline strategies to sustain the successes achieved.

Originality/value

Studies on user security behaviour are rare, especially in sub Saharan Africa, thus, this study will contribute to extant literature by adding a new dimension of user security behaviour.

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Truls Erikson

In order to become novice, portfolio or serial entrepreneurs, individuals must first establish themselves as nascent entrepreneurs. Hence, the focus of this article is the…

3553

Abstract

In order to become novice, portfolio or serial entrepreneurs, individuals must first establish themselves as nascent entrepreneurs. Hence, the focus of this article is the factors that lead early stage career individuals to choose business venturing rather than any other career path. In this article, taxonomy of entrepreneurial typologies is developed based on determinants of entrepreneurial competence. By employing Wood and Bandura’s (1998) mastery experience, vicarious experience and social experience, eight tentative typologies emerge.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 December 2021

Bram P. I. Fleuren, Amber L. Stephenson, Erin E. Sullivan, Minakshi Raj, Maike V. Tietschert, Abi Sriharan, Alden Y. Lai, Matthew J. DePuccio, Samuel C. Thomas and Ann Scheck McAlearney

The COVID-19 pandemic burdens health-care workers (HCWs) worldwide. Amid high-stress conditions and unprecedented needs for crisis management, organizations face the grand…

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic burdens health-care workers (HCWs) worldwide. Amid high-stress conditions and unprecedented needs for crisis management, organizations face the grand challenge of supporting the mental health and well-being of their HCWs. The current literature on mental health and well-being primarily focuses on improving personal resilience among HCWs. However, this puts the responsibility for coping with COVID-19-related stress almost fully on the individual. This chapter discusses an important alternative framing of this issue – how health-care organizations (HCOs) can facilitate recovery from work processes (i.e., returning to a baseline level by engaging in nonwork activities after work) for their workers. Based on a narrative review of the occupational health psychology literature, we provide practical strategies for supporting the four key recovery experiences of detachment, control, mastery, and relaxation, as well as present general recommendations about how to promote recovery. These strategies can help HCOs facing the grand challenge of sustaining worker well-being and functioning during the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as during future pandemics and for workers facing high work pressure in general.

Details

The Contributions of Health Care Management to Grand Health Care Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-801-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 August 2021

Farida Aryani, Hillman Wirawan, Abdul Saman, Sulaiman Samad and Muhammad Jufri

This study aims at investigating the indirect effect of soft skills on career engagement through the role of psychological capital (PsyCap) in different age groups. The…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims at investigating the indirect effect of soft skills on career engagement through the role of psychological capital (PsyCap) in different age groups. The social cognitive theory (SCT) and job demands-resource model (JD-R) were employed to explain the effect of perceived skill mastery on PsyCap and career engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from 707 high school students, 150 university students and 165 employees using a three-wave data collection technique. This study measured soft skills, PsyCap and career engagement at different age groups (i.e. high school students, university students and employees). The data were analysed using a moderated-mediation technique.

Findings

The results showed that soft skills positively influenced PsyCap and eventually increased career engagement in all age groups. However, the effect was stronger for students (both in high school and university) than employees in the workplaces. Unlike most students, employees related soft skills to performance. Regardless of the effect on performance, students would be more likely than employees to perceive soft skill mastery as a source of efficacy.

Research limitations/implications

First, the education system should direct more attention to developing students' non-cognitive skills. Second, people should understand that their career advancement continues in the workplace context. Organizations can foster employees' soft skills by providing more opportunities to develop new skills.

Originality/value

This study sheds light on the importance of soft skills beyond academic and workplace performance. This study is among the few empirical investigations that reveal career engagement factors across different career development stages.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 63 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 October 2020

Wondwesen Tafesse and Tor Korneliussen

The purpose of this study is to investigate the contribution of social media teams to firm social media performance. Although social media teams are tasked with planning…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the contribution of social media teams to firm social media performance. Although social media teams are tasked with planning, executing and optimizing the social media marketing effort of firms, little systematic research has examined their roles. Drawing on social cognitive theory, the present study develops collective social media efficacy as a key mechanism to explain the contribution of social media teams to firm social media performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The study tested a conceptual framework in which social media team members' previous experience, short-term training and online resources use contribute to collective social media efficacy. In turn, collective social media efficacy is hypothesized to enhance firm social media performance. The study employed primary data and PROCESS macro to test its proposed hypotheses.

Findings

The findings revealed that previous social media experience, short-term training and online resources use contributed to firm social media performance by enabling social media teams to build strong collective social media efficacy.

Originality/value

The findings offer novel insights into how firms can optimize their social media marketing effort by systematically managing their social media teams. The findings add to the nascent literature on the organizational influences of social media performance.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 December 2017

Karen Cziraki, Emily Read, Heather K. Spence Laschinger and Carol Wong

This paper aims to test a model examining precursors and outcomes of nurses’ leadership self-efficacy, and their aspirations to management positions.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to test a model examining precursors and outcomes of nurses’ leadership self-efficacy, and their aspirations to management positions.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey of 727 registered nurses across Canada was conducted. Structural equation modelling using Mplus was used to analyse the data.

Findings

Results supported the hypothesized model: χ2(312) = 949.393; CFI = 0.927; TLI = 0.919; RMSEA = 0.053 (0.049-0.057); SRMR 0.044. Skill development opportunities (ß = 0.20), temporary management roles (ß = 0.12) and informal mentoring (ß = 0.11) were significantly related to nurses’ leadership self-efficacy, which significantly influenced motivation to lead (ß = 0.77) and leadership career aspirations (ß = 0.23). Motivation to lead was significantly related to leadership career aspirations (ß = 0.50).

Practical implications

Nurses’ leadership self-efficacy is an important determinant of their motivation and intention to pursue a leadership career. Results suggest that nurses’ leadership self-efficacy can be influenced by providing opportunities for leadership mastery experiences and mentorship support. Leadership succession planning should include strategies to enhance nurses’ leadership self-efficacy and increase front-line nurses’ interest in leadership roles.

Originality value

With an aging nurse leader workforce, it is important to understand factors influencing nurses’ leadership aspirations to develop and sustain nursing leadership capacity. This research study makes an important contribution to the nursing literature by showing that nurses’ leadership self-efficacy appears to be an important determinant of their motivation to lead and desire to pursue a career as a nurse leader.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

Curt M. Adams and Patrick B. Forsyth

Recent scholarship has augmented Bandura's theory underlying efficacy formation by pointing to more proximate sources of efficacy information involved in forming…

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Abstract

Purpose

Recent scholarship has augmented Bandura's theory underlying efficacy formation by pointing to more proximate sources of efficacy information involved in forming collective teacher efficacy. These proximate sources of efficacy information theoretically shape a teacher's perception of the teaching context, operationalizing the difficulty of the teaching task that faces the school and the faculty's collective competence to be successful under specific conditions. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of three contextual variables: socioeconomic status, school level, and school structure on teacher perceptions of collective efficacy.

Design/methodology/approach

School level data were collected from a cross‐section of 79 schools in a Midwestern state. Data were analyzed at the school level using hierarchical multiple regression to determine the incremental variance in collective teacher efficacy beliefs attributed to contextual variables after accounting for the effect of prior academic performance.

Findings

Results support the premise that contextual variables do add power to explanations of collective teacher efficacy over and above the effects of prior academic performance. Further, of the three contextual variables school structure independently accounted for the most variability in perceptions of collective teacher efficacy.

Research limitations/implications

A sample of 79 schools was considered small to accurately test a hypothesized model of collective teacher efficacy formation using structural equation modeling. That approach would have had the advantage of permitting the researchers to identify the relationships among the predictor variables and between the predictors and the criterion. Additionally, there was a concern of possible aggregation bias associated with aggregating collective teacher efficacy scores to the school level. Despite these limitations, the findings hold theoretical and practical implications in that they defend the theoretical importance of contextual factors as efficacy sources. Furthermore, formalized and centralized conditions conducive to promoting perceptions of collective efficacy in teachers are identified.

Originality/value

Extant collective efficacy studies have generally not operationalized Bandura's efficacy sources to include the effects of current context. This study does.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 44 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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