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Book part
Publication date: 17 May 2018

Lynn C. Warner

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to explore the ways in which bachelor’s degree programs in library and information studies can support and enhance Master of

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to explore the ways in which bachelor’s degree programs in library and information studies can support and enhance Master of Library Science (MLS) and Master of Library and Information Science (MLIS) programs.

Approach – The history of undergraduate library degrees is examined, followed by a brief discussion of the current landscape of library education. Finally, five ways in which library and information science (LIS) undergraduate programs can revitalize the MLS/MLIS are addressed and analyzed.

Findings – Bachelor of Science in Library Science degrees can impact the MLS/MLIS degree in five discrete ways. Undergraduate programs can interest student in future information work, allow for more specialization in graduate programs, allow paraprofessionals to advance their library education, support rural libraries, and can lead to more rigorous MLS/MLIS curricula.

Value – As libraries and library education are in transition, undergraduate LIS degree programs have the potential to transform LIS education as a whole.

Details

Re-envisioning the MLS: Perspectives on the Future of Library and Information Science Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-880-0

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2006

Diane L. Barlow and Elizabeth Aversa

Asheim concluded by noting that the need for change was the thread that connected almost all discussions of library education during the decade; change was not just…

Abstract

Asheim concluded by noting that the need for change was the thread that connected almost all discussions of library education during the decade; change was not just accepted but anticipated, encouraged, and even instigated at an increasing pace. The accompanying effect on professional education was that “… the stress in education … fell upon education-for-change rather than upon the history, the heritage, the tradition.”(1975, p. 178) Wisely, perhaps, Asheim declined to predict whether or not this particular stress on change would continue, but he did raise the possibility of a respite, a period when change would be placed to the side in favor of reaction and retrenchment. Thirty years later his words sound almost wistful:The next few years may be a period of synthesis following the antithesis of the past decade—not a complete return to an earlier and more leisurely past, but not so violent a wrench as was feared by some, and sought by others (1975, p. 178).

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Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-007-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1994

Michael Afolabi

Identifies the various careers associated with library and informationscience. Apart from the existing information careers described, alsoidentifies new related areas…

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1650

Abstract

Identifies the various careers associated with library and information science. Apart from the existing information careers described, also identifies new related areas. Notes that a re‐training programme is necessary if library and information science graduates are to fit into the new information‐related jobs and that African departments of library and information science should review their training objectives and curricula to cater for information‐related jobs other than the training of librarians. Submits that library jobs are becoming increasingly difficult to come by and points out the need to prepare the library and information science graduate for other equally profitable and exciting areas.

Details

New Library World, vol. 95 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

Lucy A. Tedd

The purpose of this research is to report on research undertaken into the use made of library and information science (LIS) journals in dissertations written by students…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to report on research undertaken into the use made of library and information science (LIS) journals in dissertations written by students undertaking the Master's course in Information and Library Studies at the University of Wales Aberystwyth.

Design/methodology/approach

Analysis of the citations of 100 (post 2000) dissertations submitted gives an indication of the range of material used in dissertations. In addition, responses to questionnaires from students provide information about how relevant papers are found from LIS journals.

Findings

Journals with a practical bias were cited more than research‐oriented journals. Lists of the most “popular” journal titles are included.

Originality/value

The research provides a “snapshot” of the use made of LIS journals by Master's students in their dissertations.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 58 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Paula C Johnson and Jennifer E. Simonsen

The purpose of this study was to determine whether engineering master’s students at a medium-sized university use library-provided abstracting and indexing (A&I) services…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to determine whether engineering master’s students at a medium-sized university use library-provided abstracting and indexing (A&I) services (e.g. Compendex), and if they do, to what extent, in what manner and for what purposes.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methodology approach was used to explore electronic information-seeking patterns of engineering master’s students at New Mexico State University. Usage statistics, a focus group and a Web-based survey were used, the latter composed of 17 questions using a critical incident approach and direct questions to probe: reasons for and method of search, types of materials used (with relative frequencies), means of obtaining materials and evaluations of the usefulness of five library-provided A&I services.

Findings

Only 15 per cent of respondents used a subscription A&I service such as Compendex when searching specific terms. The majority of sources used were located through known term searches, and master’s learned of these information resources through article citations or conversations with colleagues. Half the respondents reported using Google Scholar to find the last scholarly article they had read. Engineering master’s students – similar to practicing engineers – evaluate the costs associated with obtaining information, and may “satisfice”. Even so, students expressed interest in increasing their knowledge of skills and strategies to find worthwhile electronic information.

Originality/value

This study sheds light on engineering master’s students’ use of A&I services, and examines their perceptions of five of these services commonly provided by academic libraries.

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Koraljka Golub, Joacim Hansson and Lars Selden

The purpose of the paper is to analyse three Scandinavian iSchools in Denmark, Norway and Sweden with regard to their intentions of becoming iSchools and curriculum…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to analyse three Scandinavian iSchools in Denmark, Norway and Sweden with regard to their intentions of becoming iSchools and curriculum content in relation to these intentions. By doing so, a picture will be given of the international expansion of the iSchool concept in terms of organisational symbolism and practical educational content. In order to underline the approaches of the Scandinavian schools, comparisons are made to three American iSchools.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is framed through theory on organisational symbolism and the intentions of the iSchool movement as formulated in its vision statements. Empirically, the study consists of two parts: close readings of three documents outlining the considerations of three Scandinavian LIS schools before applying for the iSchool status, and statistical analysis of 427 syllabi from master level courses at three Scandinavian and three American iSchools.

Findings

All three Scandinavian schools, analysed, have recently become iSchools, and though some differences are visible, it is hard to distinguish anything in their syllabi as carriers of what can be described as an iSchool identity. In considering iSchool identity, it instead benefits on a symbolic level that are most prominent, such as branding, social visibility and the possible attraction of new student groups. The traditionally strong relation to national library sectors are emphasised as important to maintain, specifically in Norway and Sweden.

Research limitations/implications

The study is done on iSchools in Denmark, Norway and Sweden with empirical comparison to three American schools. These comparisons face the challenge of meeting the educational system and programme structure of each individual country. Despite this, findings prove possible to use as ground for conclusions, although empirical generalisations concerning, for instance, other countries must be made with caution.

Practical implications

This study highlights the practical challenges met in international expansion of the iSchool movement, both on a practical and symbolic level. Both the iSchool Caucus and individual schools considering becoming iSchools may use these findings as a point of reference in development and decision making.

Originality/value

This is an original piece of research from which the results may contribute to the international development of the iSchool movement, and extend the theoretical understanding of the iSchool movement as an educational and organisational construct.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 73 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Abstract

Details

European Origins of Library and Information Science
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-718-4

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2021

Tessa Withorn, Jillian Eslami, Hannah Lee, Maggie Clarke, Carolyn Caffrey Gardner, Cristina Springfield, Dana Ospina, Anthony Andora, Amalia Castañeda, Alexandra Mitchell, Joanna Messer Kimmitt, Wendolyn Vermeer and Aric Haas

This paper presents recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of publications covering various library types, study populations and research contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations, reports and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2020.

Findings

The paper provides a brief description of all 440 sources and highlights sources that contain unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians, researchers and anyone interested in a quick and comprehensive reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 8 January 2021

Abstract

Details

Examining the impact of industry 4.0 on academic libraries
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-656-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

William Y. Arms

Attempts to deal with the issue of how we can educate the next generation of leaders for the information needs of the future.

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3177

Abstract

Purpose

Attempts to deal with the issue of how we can educate the next generation of leaders for the information needs of the future.

Design/methodology/approach

Uses a case study: the thinking behind the new information science program at Cornell University.

Findings

Advocates a broad view of information science. In a rapidly changing world, leadership will come from flexible thinking based on a broad understanding of technology and the social sciences. In the American terminology, information science should be considered a liberal art, not a profession. An education in information science provides an excellent foundation for a career in libraries, publishing or information services, but there are many more career opportunities for somebody with this education.

Originality/value

Most recent initiatives in information science have come from professional schools of librarianship. By starting from a liberal arts viewpoint, universities may be meeting the needs of a very wide audience.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

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