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Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2019

Kenneth Snead, Fred Coleman and Earl McKinney

This chapter presents findings from a recently conducted process for obtaining Accounting Advisory Board (AAB) input related to Master of Accountancy curriculum of one…

Abstract

This chapter presents findings from a recently conducted process for obtaining Accounting Advisory Board (AAB) input related to Master of Accountancy curriculum of one university. Board members represent both large and small public accounting firms as well as corporate offices of Fortune 500 companies and non-profit organizations. AAB input includes perceptions of the relative importance of over 160 candidate topics for the courses making up the program’s infrastructure, as well as written comments noting other potential topics and pedagogical approaches to consider. Comparisons of topic rankings reveal a strong level of consistency among Board member types for the traditional accounting courses with structured content, as opposed to those courses involving more systems-related topics or having a wider range of specialized topics. Furthermore, the authors compare Board perceptions regarding topic necessity to those of faculty and note faculty reactions. Specifically, the authors find that faculty ranking consistency with the Board is weak, illustrating the importance of seeking curricular Board input on an ongoing basis. To “close the loop,” faculty incorporated many curriculum changes, involving both the topics to be covered and the overall approach to the course.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-394-5

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Abstract

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Advances in Accounting Education Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-868-1

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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2018

Norazira Abd Karim, Anuar Nawawi and Ahmad Saiful Azlin Puteh Salin

The purposes of this study are to examine the standard operating procedure (SOP) on inventory management practices, identify any weaknesses in inventory management and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purposes of this study are to examine the standard operating procedure (SOP) on inventory management practices, identify any weaknesses in inventory management and examine its impact on the performance of the company. Inventory management is important because it ensures smooth production and prevents loss of sales because of stockout and/or customer dissatisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

This study selects one manufacturing company as a case study and uses the mixed data collection method of document analysis and observation. The research analysis was conducted by using COSO Internal Control – Integrated Frame work 2013 as guidance.

Findings

It is revealed that a company practices risky inventory management in keeping stock, as it relies heavily on third-party warehousing services beyond the control of the company. This study also reveals that the SOPs are too general and lack specificity. However, poor inventory management has a modest influence on the financial performance of the company.

Research limitations/implications

In completing this study, some limitations are experienced such as changes on the management structure of the company as well as the department itself. Frequent changes on several procedures also may influence this study to obtain accurate information. In addition, some highly confidential documents such as detailed information and minutes from management meeting were not permitted to be examined.

Practical implications

This study provides recommendations to improve weak internal controls particularly on SOPs, so that fraud and mismanagement opportunities can be reduced.

Originality/value

This study makes an original contribution, as it enhances the theoretical and practical understanding on inventory control and management systems, particularly for a manufacturing company in the emerging market environment. In addition, it examines various internal financial reports and directly observes the process in supply change management, which are generally difficult to be accessed by academic researchers.

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International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 60 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Norazira Abd Karim, Anuar Nawawi and Ahmad Saiful Azlin Puteh Salin

For a manufacturing company, inventory control and management is crucial to ensure smooth production and sustainable sales performance, as well as preventing stockout that…

Abstract

Purpose

For a manufacturing company, inventory control and management is crucial to ensure smooth production and sustainable sales performance, as well as preventing stockout that will result in customer switch to competitors. This paper aims to examine the effectiveness of cycle count activities, one of the inventory control tools to manage inventory. Beside, this study also wishes to identify any loopholes in practices and procedures in inventory control of companies.

Design/methodology/approach

One of the lubricant manufacturing companies in Malaysia was selected as a case study and mixed method data collection of document analysis and observation were used. The analysis and examination was conducted by using Committee of Sponsoring Organization of the Treadway Commission Framework 2013 as guidance.

Findings

This study found that problems in inventory control can be caused by inconsistency of practices due to incomplete or absent standard operating procedures. Furthermore, no segregation of duties and excessive reliance on one person to conduct many tasks will lead to human error and fraud.

Research limitations/implications

This paper enhances the theoretical understanding on the inventory control and management system applied in the manufacturing organization particularly. However, frequent changes of the management in the organization of the case study make the study difficult to obtain consistent information. Not all standard operating procedures were revised or updated and available for examination. In addition, some of the reports needed for investigation are confidential and requests to observe and scrutinize information from those documents are denied by the company. Thus, more in-depth analysis and verification on the issues of interest were unable to be conducted.

Practical implications

This study provides an indicator that cycle count activities need to be conducted frequently on a regular basis so that the physical inventory and recording system are accurate. Cycle count activities also must involves various related departments in the company in which regular training is essential to ensure employees are aware and understand their responsibility and accountability on the inventory.

Originality/value

This study is original as it focuses on the inventory control management of one of the largest lubricant manufacturing in Malaysia, particularly on cycle count activities which is scare in literature. Furthermore, the company allows research access to the documents and operations conducted in the company, which is usually difficult to obtain from many companies.

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Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1997

Lucia Peek and George Peek

Describes a “live interactive” case in which internal auditing graduate students provided audit services to a university’s Department of Accountancy. The department were…

Abstract

Describes a “live interactive” case in which internal auditing graduate students provided audit services to a university’s Department of Accountancy. The department were preparing for an American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) accreditation visit. Students participating in the project took the role of an evaluation team and performed a mock AACSB review. They were required to determine whether and how the Accountancy Department faculty perceived they were achieving the department’s stated mission and educational objectives which will also be assessed by the AACSB review team. The project simulates an internal audit in which students determine whether an organization’s personnel accomplished their established goals. The project allows students to utilize standard internal audit procedures from a textbook in a real world audit engagement. Students also have the opportunity to practice a variety of professional skills, especially effective interviewing, which is an important skill for auditors to develop and practice. The case can be expanded by focusing on a different group of university constituents, such as students or alumni, or by addressing the college’s or university’s goals and mission statements. It is also adaptable to any organizations that have stated mission and goals statements.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 12 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Syed Musa Alhabshi, Hafiz Majdi Ab Rashid, Sharifah Khadijah Syed Agil and Mezbah Uddin Ahmed

This paper aims to address the financial reporting dimensions of intangible assets with specific reference to International Accounting Standards (IAS) 38 as well as…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to address the financial reporting dimensions of intangible assets with specific reference to International Accounting Standards (IAS) 38 as well as relevant International Financial Reporting Standards (IAS 38 exclusion) that are embedded within intangible assets. These have implications for Islamic financial assets with identifiable and measurable intangible components.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses the qualitative research method by way of interviews followed by focus group discussions with professional accountants/accounting academics and Sharīʿah scholars/advisors from academia, the industry and regulatory bodies. Analysis of relevant literature is made to understand the subject matter and Sharīʿah-related issues.

Findings

The study observes that the accounting dimensions of tangible assets are generally consistent with Sharīʿah requirements. However, significant variation arises when the dimensions of intangible assets are represented in financial assets.

Research limitations/implications

The paper presents an exploratory in-depth analysis within the context of intangible assets as specified in IAS 38.

Originality/value

The paper elucidates the comparative accounting dimensions and Sharīʿah requirements in reporting financial assets.

Details

ISRA International Journal of Islamic Finance, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0128-1976

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2011

Lori L. Epping and W. Mark Wilder

The purpose of this study is to examine credibility attributes in a website disclosure venue.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine credibility attributes in a website disclosure venue.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 100 MBA and Masters of accountancy students participated in an experiment to assess whether specific disclosure characteristics impact the credibility of optimistic, forward‐looking voluntary disclosures. The disclosure characteristics examined include management's ability to meet the current earnings forecast and the disclosure of positive corporate governance qualities. A between‐subjects 2×2 analysis of variance (ANOVA) is used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The findings indicate that disclosure of positive corporate governance qualities improves the credibility of optimistic, forward‐looking voluntary disclosures. In addition, the credibility of optimistic, forward‐looking voluntary disclosures is greater when management has met its current earnings forecast.

Research limitations/implications

Suggestions for future research include determining whether the importance of credibility attributes differ across presentation venues. For example, credibility attributes that are important in a website venue may be less important when used in conjunction with voluntary MD&A disclosures. In addition, the impact of the disclosure of corporate governance qualities on the credibility of voluntary disclosures may differ across subject groups.

Originality/value

The increasing use of the investor relations pages of corporate websites and the push for enhanced disclosures underscores the importance of understanding voluntary disclosures in a website venue and the related attributes that improve the credibility of these disclosures.

Details

Journal of Financial Reporting and Accounting, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1985-2517

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Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2011

Elizabeth V. Grace and Thomas G. Black

We explore the validity of Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) scores and grade point averages (GPAs) for predicting comprehensive student performance in an…

Abstract

We explore the validity of Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) scores and grade point averages (GPAs) for predicting comprehensive student performance in an accelerated-cohort masters of accountancy (MA) program from 2002 through 2009. We confirm findings of prior studies that graduate accounting student performance increases in GMAT scores and undergraduate GPAs; however, undergraduate GPA is significant only for U.S. students. International student performance is overwhelmingly explained by language ability, as measured by GMAT verbal and analytical writing scores. When performance is defined as job placement with a public accounting firm after graduation, we find no significant association between performance and either GMAT scores or undergraduate GPA. Additionally, the factors that are significantly associated with obtaining a job in public accounting differ for U.S. and international students. These findings may have implications for admission decisions and curriculum design of U.S. graduate accounting programs.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-223-4

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Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2014

Mary C. Hill and Jane Campbell

Many accounting departments have implemented assurance of learning (AoL) processes in the last few years because accreditation agencies have mandated it. In prior…

Abstract

Many accounting departments have implemented assurance of learning (AoL) processes in the last few years because accreditation agencies have mandated it. In prior articles, we described an early assessment process (Stivers, Campbell, & Hermanson, 2000), a revised assessment process, and a suggested systems-oriented methodology for implementing an AoL process (Hill & Campbell, 2007). The purpose of this article is to provide the post-implementation review of our revised AoL process. We evaluate whether the AoL process is meeting the users’ goals effectively and efficiently. To do this, we provide the feedback we received from our Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) accreditation visit, the results of a faculty survey, and some output from our AoL system. Our review indicates that while the AACSB accreditation team viewed our AoL process as a “best practice,” the faculty members evaluated the process less positively. Faculty members were concerned about the number and clarity of the learning goals, the usefulness of the information generated, and the cost/benefit of the process with respect to the time involved. We conclude that different goals for the AoL process, accountability versus course improvement, drive the difference in opinion between the accreditation team and the faculty. Changes in senior management in the college along with faculty opinions have led to significant changes in the college’s AoL process including changing the name from AoL to TLC (Teaching and Learning Community). The results of this research emphasize the importance of treating the AoL program as a dynamic process that must be periodically evaluated to determine if it is meeting the organizations’ goals for the process. If the AoL program is not meeting goals or costing too much to meet them, then it should be revised and improved.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-840-2

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Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2020

Thomas G. Calderon and Albert L. Nagy

This paper provides a comprehensive review of the academic research related to the certified public accountant (CPA) exam. Our review identifies several research streams…

Abstract

This paper provides a comprehensive review of the academic research related to the certified public accountant (CPA) exam. Our review identifies several research streams in this area, including studies that examine the effects of educational requirements and institutional and candidate characteristics on CPA exam success. In addition, we describe the CPA licensure regulatory landscape and show a general trend of lessening educational requirements among the jurisdictions over the past two decades. In the meantime, the governing bodies of CPA licensure are beginning the CPA Evolution project, a project that entails evolving licensure requirements, including the CPA exam, to meet the demands of a constantly changing business environment. We call on the CPA licensure regulators to align their jurisdictions’ educational requirements to best serve the CPA Evolution project. Lastly, we provide suggestions for future research that would assist accounting regulators, academic administrators, and practitioners during this transformative period.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-236-2

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1 – 10 of over 2000