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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Romeo Castagna and Massimiliano Galli

In a manufacturing system, time performances are measures of systemresponse speed to external influences. This speed depends on theresource allocation process (materials…

Abstract

In a manufacturing system, time performances are measures of system response speed to external influences. This speed depends on the resource allocation process (materials, equipment, labour) which is driven by finished‐product forecasts. Describes two essential steps, in order to develop a model for evaluating time performances which is able to detect crucial resources. The first step is represented by analysing forecast characteristics; the second step is expressed by a definition of the environment of manufacturing resources. The model, depicted in its structure and in its relationships with the most common business tools, has been tested in a number of manufacturing firms and the results are also shown.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2011

Luca Fiorito and Massimiliano Vatiero

Warner Winslow Gardner's notes on The Institutional Theory of John R. Commons (1933) are published here for the first time, as far as the present editors can determine…

Abstract

Warner Winslow Gardner's notes on The Institutional Theory of John R. Commons (1933) are published here for the first time, as far as the present editors can determine. The typewritten manuscript was found among the Robert Lee Hale papers at the Rare Book and Manuscript Library of Columbia University.2 Gardner (1909–2003) was born in Richmond, Indiana. He went to Westtown School, a Quaker preparatory school in Pennsylvania for five years, and then to Swarthmore College, graduating in 1930. To escape unemployment, as he stated in his recorded reminiscences, Gardner took graduate work on a fellowship at Rutgers University, receiving a Master of Arts Degree in economics in 1931.3 From there he went to Columbia Law School, graduating in 1934. Quite significantly, Gardner attributed his decision of shifting from economics to law to his reading of Commons’ Legal Foundation of Capitalism:It would be 1930–31 and, in the course of that year, I read and was much impressed by a book by John R. Commons at the University of Wisconsin in which he tried to weave together economics and law. I thought, “aha,” here is a field that had real attraction and real potentiality. I ended up with an MA at the end of that year. Instead of going for a Ph.D. in economics, I thought I’d go to law school, study law and try to weave the two disciplines together into a meaningful structure. (Gardner, 1972, p. 16).

Details

Wisconsin, Labor, Income, and Institutions: Contributions from Commons and Bronfenbrenner
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-010-0

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