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Book part
Publication date: 31 March 2010

David Prochaska

This chapter is an exercise in speaking, letting individuals speak for themselves insofar as possible. As Marx famously put it, “they cannot represent themselves, they…

Abstract

This chapter is an exercise in speaking, letting individuals speak for themselves insofar as possible. As Marx famously put it, “they cannot represent themselves, they must be represented.” The “they” were peasants, potato farmers in 1840s France, and by extension peasants, workers, and other lower class groups, not to mention women and minorities who rarely made it into the historical record, and even more rarely in their own words. To give “voice to the voiceless,” as the now old new social historians of the 1960s and 1970s put it, I consciously include here numerous speakers, arranged in two sets of different voices: quotes in the text and endnotes to further document and amplify points. With this plethora of voices, the aim is not to complicate but to speak clearly, listen carefully, and engage respectfully. To multiply the speakers speaking is the single best way to make two primary points concerning what is most important about the Chief Illiniwek mascot controversy: that the sheer number of individuals speaking out is in itself significant, and that this community colloquy all comes down to identity – who we are, individual identity, communal identity.

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Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-961-9

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Book part
Publication date: 4 July 2013

C. Richard King

Purpose – This chapter examines how and why the continued use of Indianness in sport makes many American Indians uneasy and then turns to consider the…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter examines how and why the continued use of Indianness in sport makes many American Indians uneasy and then turns to consider the manner in which Native Americans have assisted with and even endorsed such monikers and mascots.

Design/methodology/approach – The current study employs interpretive approaches common in cultural studies (broadly defined). It offers textual readings of historical incidences as well as ethnographic readings of current events.

Findings – The key findings of the study offer new insights into the multiple and often competing ways in which indigenous athletes, fans, and communities interpret Native American mascots, stressing the overlooked role of American Indians who enact and endorse them.

Research limitations/implications – The focus on the use of indigeneity in the United States is the key limitation of the current research.

Originality/value – The central contribution of this work lies in its attention to the social significance and cultural politics of indigenous interpretations of American Indian mascots. In particular, it explores the complexities and contradictions central to such interpretations, stressing the unappreciated role of expectations and the pronounced uneasiness at their core.

Details

Native Games: Indigenous Peoples and Sports in the Post-Colonial World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-592-0

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2020

Walanchalee Wattanacharoensil, Sappawat Kantamara and Kaewta Muangasame

This study aims to investigate what the crucial elements are when it comes to using a mascot to brand a destination. This study applies the proposed framework of “mascot

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate what the crucial elements are when it comes to using a mascot to brand a destination. This study applies the proposed framework of “mascot usage for destination branding” to two mascot cases, namely, Kumamon and Sukjai. In particular, the Kumamon mascot is first investigated, looking at how it is used to promote Kumamoto, one of the key cities in Kyushu, Japan. Sukjai, another mascot, is then analysed in a similar light. The dominant factors that lead to the success of Kumamon mascot are analysed on the case of Sukjai mascot. The disparity between the two mascot cases allows for a better understanding of the dimensions and practices or lack thereof, that can occur in mascot creation and implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative methodology is applied, and thematic and content analyses are applied to the three data sources, namely, secondary data collection from different data sources in the English and Japanese languages; researcher onsite observation in Kumamoto; and an in-depth interview with purposive sampling experts.

Findings

The findings indicate that according to the proposed framework, Kumamon has shown all three elements of the framework, namely, promoting destination identity and personality, creating differentiation for the location and having strong stakeholder involvement. On the other hand, these elements were found not to be as strong in the Sukjai case. The findings from the case comparison determine several underlining factors, including the national culture, which can help or hinder in laying the groundwork for the successful application of a mascot in destination branding.

Originality/value

This study complements the previous literature on mascot branding and elaborates on the framework of mascot usage for destination branding based on a combination of the three proposed elements.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2014

Peter Knight, Ina Freeman, Stephen Stuart, Gerald Griggs and Norm O’Reilly

– The purpose of this paper is to review Olympic mascots in the electronic and traditional communications environments.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review Olympic mascots in the electronic and traditional communications environments.

Design/methodology/approach

Olympic mascots from 2006 to 2012 are analyzed using a descriptive semiotic analysis technique.

Findings

Results found that none of the 2006-2012 mascots clearly represented the two most recognizable icons of the Olympic movement, the Olympic Rings and the Olympic Flame. The association of the London 2012 mascots with the Olympic Games are found to be limited.

Research limitations/implications

This research sets the stage for a number of future studies to further assess the management issues, social benefits, and potential missteps regarding mascots at the Olympic Games and other mega-events.

Practical implications

The practitioner of today working for a mega-event like the Olympic Games needs to be aware of the potential benefits and inherent risks of developing and implementing a mascot.

Originality/value

This research is the first to look specifically at Olympic mascots in the electronic age and contrast their use to traditional communications.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

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Book part
Publication date: 31 March 2010

Synthia Sydnor

In 1993, inspired by Sansone's (1998) book on the origin of sport, I speculated about sport mascots and cultural performance in an article published in the Journal of

Abstract

In 1993, inspired by Sansone's (1998) book on the origin of sport, I speculated about sport mascots and cultural performance in an article published in the Journal of Sport & Social Issues (Sydnor-Slowikowski, 1993). It was a tentative piece that combined some of Sansone's ethological thesis with performativity/performance studies to contemplate contemporary collective/social authenticity, imperialist nostalgia and to critique racist ideologies linked to sport mascots, such as that of Chief Illiniwek, the University of Illinois’ stereotyped mascot of a mythical Native American.

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Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-961-9

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2010

Kristin J. Henrich and Diane Prorak

This paper aims to describe the University of Idaho Library's efforts to develop instructional videos starring the school mascot, Joe Vandal, and integrate these videos…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the University of Idaho Library's efforts to develop instructional videos starring the school mascot, Joe Vandal, and integrate these videos across the curriculum using the university's course management system. Video development, implementation in library instruction courses, and student and faculty assessment are discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

The video creation process is described thoroughly, with an eye towards best practices, for those libraries that may wish to develop their own videos. Applications for implementation outside library instruction are also discussed.

Findings

Although costly, professional‐quality videos are an engaging and effective way to reach students. Students at the University of Idaho found the library's instructional videos, starring the school mascot, to be entertaining, informative, and easy to understand.

Research limitations/implications

The longitudinal effect of the videos on information literacy instruction has yet to be determined. Future research should study the efficacy of the videos by evaluating the book‐finding ability of control groups of students who have viewed the video and those who have not.

Practical implications

The increasing ubiquity of film‐making software and of video‐hosting sites makes video a more attractive vehicle for information literacy concepts than ever before. Instructional videos are especially relevant when used by those libraries which wish to integrate materials into a course management system.

Originality/value

Although using video for library instruction is not a new concept, creating instructional videos starring the school mascot in the role of the information‐seeker is unique.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 31 March 2010

Stephen J. Kaufman

At the November 24, 1997 meeting of the student–faculty Senate of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the pending NCAA certification review of the university's…

Abstract

At the November 24, 1997 meeting of the student–faculty Senate of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the pending NCAA certification review of the university's athletic programs was discussed. At that meeting, it was recommended that the university's Division of Intercollegiate Athletics include in the goals of its Self Study,To consider whether the caricature and impersonation of a Native American Indian as the UIUC athletic mascot serves the integrity of the UIUC athletic program, the campus, and the principles of the NCAA.

Details

Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-961-9

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Book part
Publication date: 31 March 2010

Carol Spindel

Eighteen schools are now on the NCAA's mascot pariah list. Three are Braves. Six are Indians. Four identify as specific tribes – Seminoles, Utes, Chippewas, and Choctaws…

Abstract

Eighteen schools are now on the NCAA's mascot pariah list. Three are Braves. Six are Indians. Four identify as specific tribes – Seminoles, Utes, Chippewas, and Choctaws. Carthage College calls itself the Redmen. Illinois has created its own tribe, the Fighting Illini. The last school on the list – Southeastern Oklahoma State – does not beat around the bush or go for modifiers. They are the Savages.

Details

Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-961-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Joyce M. Wolburg

The intent of this article is to show why the use of Native American mascots, logos, and nicknames by sports teams perpetuates depictions that are perceived as harmful and…

Abstract

Purpose

The intent of this article is to show why the use of Native American mascots, logos, and nicknames by sports teams perpetuates depictions that are perceived as harmful and racist by Native Americans.

Design/methodology/approach

This article examines data from published research, personal correspondence, and essays by Native Americans so that non‐natives can understand the issue from the native perspective. It also calls into question previous communication efforts that may have limited the voices of Native Americans.

Findings

By examining the meaning of warriors and other cultural symbols for Native Americans and by exploring the different views of sports between natives and non‐natives, the article shows why it is unacceptable to ignore the native voice. It also demonstrates that it is possible for a sports team with a native identity to successfully change its brand image.

Practical implications

Marketers, consumers, owners of sports teams, universities, and members of outside organizations can be better informed as to why Native Americans have asked for an end to this practice. Marketers can also understand why the objections go far beyond political correctness and are part of a human rights issue.

Originality/value

The article helps stakeholders understand why privileging a revenue stream over the impact on human rights is an example of misplaced marketing.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Book part
Publication date: 7 November 2011

Stephen Brown

Purpose – Anthropomorphism abounds in contemporary consumer culture. This chapter evaluates the recent anthropomorphic uptick and shows how it can be utilized for…

Abstract

Purpose – Anthropomorphism abounds in contemporary consumer culture. This chapter evaluates the recent anthropomorphic uptick and shows how it can be utilized for pedagogic purposes – namely, a brand animal novel called The Penguin's Progress.

Methods/approach – The chapter adopts a case study approach (though “exemplar” is perhaps a better word). It employs an alternative mode of knowledge representation, fictionalized nonfiction.

Findings – The exemplar reveals that student engagement is enhanced when unorthodox modes of representation are embraced by educators, though such pedagogic tactics are not without their shortcomings.

Research implications – If student reaction to The Penguin's Progress is any indication, then this chapter has enormous implications for the way consumer researchers communicate their ideas. A root and branch rethink is required.

Practical implications – The Penguin's Progress provides an alternative pedagogic option, an off-beat route to knowledge acquisition. Whether it's widely adopted, remains to be seen.

Originality – The chapter reveals that marketing and consumer research does not have to be written in a dry-as-dust manner.

Details

Research in Consumer Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-116-9

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