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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2021

Victoria Wells, Navdeep Athwal, Esterina Nervino and Marylyn Carrigan

By responding to scholarly calls, this study examines the environmental reports of LVMH and Kering. The study extends legitimacy theory to ascertain the credibility of the…

Abstract

Purpose

By responding to scholarly calls, this study examines the environmental reports of LVMH and Kering. The study extends legitimacy theory to ascertain the credibility of the aforementioned luxury conglomerates' commitment to environmental sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

A corpus-assisted discourse analysis centred upon the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) guidelines is used to examine the environmental disclosures of LVMH and Kering.

Findings

The findings show inconsistencies due to the lack of brand-level reporting and reporting quality falls short of comparable sustainability reporting within each conglomerate and with one another. Selective and unbalanced reporting along with symbolic management undermines the legitimacy of sustainability efforts by LVMH and Kering.

Originality/value

Despite the increased attention paid to sustainable luxury, few studies critically analyse how luxury brands formally report on sustainability.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 September 2020

Iain Davies, Caroline J. Oates, Caroline Tynan, Marylyn Carrigan, Katherine Casey, Teresa Heath, Claudia E. Henninger, Maria Lichrou, Pierre McDonagh, Seonaidh McDonald, Sally McKechnie, Fraser McLeay, Lisa O'Malley and Victoria Wells

Seeking ways towards a sustainable future is the most dominant socio-political challenge of our time. Marketing should have a crucial role to play in leading research and…

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1323

Abstract

Purpose

Seeking ways towards a sustainable future is the most dominant socio-political challenge of our time. Marketing should have a crucial role to play in leading research and impact in sustainability, yet it is limited by relying on cognitive behavioural theories rooted in the 1970s, which have proved to have little bearing on actual behaviour. This paper aims to interrogate why marketing is failing to address the challenge of sustainability and identify alternative approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

The constraint in theoretical development contextualises the problem, followed by a focus on four key themes to promote theory development: developing sustainable people; models of alternative consumption; building towards sustainable marketplaces; and theoretical domains for the future. These themes were developed and refined during the 2018 Academy of Marketing workshop on seeking sustainable futures. MacInnis’s (2011) framework for conceptual contributions in marketing provides the narrative thread and structure.

Findings

The current state of play is explicated, combining the four themes and MacInnis’s framework to identify the failures and gaps in extant approaches to the field.

Research limitations/implications

This paper sets a new research agenda for the marketing discipline in quest for sustainable futures in marketing and consumer research.

Practical implications

Approaches are proposed which will allow the transformation of the dominant socio-economic systems towards a model capable of promoting a sustainable future.

Originality/value

The paper provides thought leadership in marketing and sustainability as befits the special issue, by moving beyond the description of the problem to making a conceptual contribution and setting a research agenda for the future.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 February 2020

Marylyn Carrigan, Solon Magrizos, Jordon Lazell and Ioannis Kostopoulos

This article addresses the lack of scholarly attention paid to the sharing economy from a sociological perspective, with respect to the technology-mediated interactions…

Abstract

Purpose

This article addresses the lack of scholarly attention paid to the sharing economy from a sociological perspective, with respect to the technology-mediated interactions between sharing economy users. The paper provides a critical overview of the sharing economy and its impact on business and communities and explores how information technology can facilitate authentic, genuine sharing through exercising and enabling conviviality and non-direct reciprocity.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper begins with a critique of the technology-mediated sharing economy, introduces the concept of conviviality as a tool to grow and shape community and sustainability within the sharing economy and then explores reciprocity and sharing behaviour. Finally, the paper draws upon social exchange theory to illustrate conviviality and reciprocity, using four case studies of technology-enabled sharing.

Findings

The paper contributes to the emerging debate around how the sharing economy, driven by information systems and technology, affects social cohesion and personal relationships. The paper elucidates the central role conviviality and reciprocity play in explaining the paradoxes, tensions and impact of the sharing economy on society. Conviviality and reciprocity are positioned as key capabilities of a more sustainable version of the sharing economy, enabled via information technology.

Originality/value

The findings reveal that information technology-mediated sharing enterprises should promote conviviality and reciprocity in order to deliver more positive environmental, economic and social benefits. The diversity of existing operations indicated by the findings and the controversies discussed will guide the critical study of the social potential of sharing economy to avoid treating all sharing alike.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Malcolm Kirkup and Marylyn Carrigan

In an increasingly competitive market there is a keen interest among retailers to understand as much as possible about consumer behaviour. Advances in technology have…

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5381

Abstract

In an increasingly competitive market there is a keen interest among retailers to understand as much as possible about consumer behaviour. Advances in technology have presented retail marketers with many new research tools with which to monitor such behaviour. Alongside such advances in technology, however, have come accusations that some aspects of marketing and marketing research raise ethical issues. Those engaged in the use of new marketing and research methods therefore need to be aware of any potential public concerns and be seen to adhere rigorously to ethical practice. This paper examines the growing use of video surveillance within retail stores. The technique offers an objective and accurate research tool for retailers to monitor consumer behaviour. However, along with increasing use comes the potential danger of abuse, and the paper finds that few guidelines exist to assist retailers or researchers in managing this type of research.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 28 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Emma Boulstridge and Marylyn Carrigan

According to the press at the turn of the year 1999—2000, a good corporate reputation for responsible marketing is a key element in business success. One justification for…

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11153

Abstract

According to the press at the turn of the year 1999—2000, a good corporate reputation for responsible marketing is a key element in business success. One justification for this is the assumption that consumers are interested in how companies behave and this has an influence upon their consumption behaviour. There is also the suggestion that a financial pay‐off is to be gained from good behaviour. Conflicting reports in previous research cast doubt upon the reliability of these assumptions, and there are few studies which unequivocally support positive consumer purchasing in return for responsible marketing. This paper reviews current opinion and evidence in relation to the growing interest in corporate reputation, and reports findings from focus group research which casts doubt upon the efficacy of corporate reputation in influencing positive consumer purchase behaviour.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Marylyn Carrigan, Isabelle Szmigin and Joanne Wright

This paper presents an interpretive study of older consumers and their potential for ethical consumption. Although latterly marketers are recognising the value of older…

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17976

Abstract

This paper presents an interpretive study of older consumers and their potential for ethical consumption. Although latterly marketers are recognising the value of older consumers, research has not yet examined their attitudes and behaviour towards ethical consumption. From the collection of individual interviews conducted for this study, it would seem that older people share a sense of moral responsibility in their purchase behaviour, and as a community are willing to engage in affirmative purchasing and boycotting. Although there are perceived barriers to their participation in broader ethical purchasing activities, they would appear to be a potentially significant force in the consumer resistance movement. The findings suggest that as a group, older consumers should be considered as an important target market for ethical marketers who wish to benefit from their collective sense of social obligation.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Marylyn Carrigan and Isabelle Szmigin

Older consumers have grown in number and affluence in the UK, but past research evidence suggests that they are less likely to be portrayed in advertisements than younger…

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2593

Abstract

Older consumers have grown in number and affluence in the UK, but past research evidence suggests that they are less likely to be portrayed in advertisements than younger people. The wisdom of this approach has been questioned, particularly where depictions of older people feature caricature portrayals of infirmity. Older people today are more likely to be fit and active, and desire to see themselves portrayed as such in advertisements. Investigates whether UK advertisements feature older people, and the nature of that portrayal, and compares and contrasts the findings with past studies in the USA and UK. The results suggest that in UK magazines specifically targeted at older consumers, the advertisements do contain acceptable levels of older characters portrayed in a favourable manner.

Details

Journal of Marketing Practice: Applied Marketing Science, vol. 5 no. 6/7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2538

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Marylyn Carrigan, Svetla Marinova and Isabelle Szmigin

This paper is a general review contextualising the current debate on ethics and international marketing. The aim of the paper is to present an overview of historical and…

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23150

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is a general review contextualising the current debate on ethics and international marketing. The aim of the paper is to present an overview of historical and current trends as a background for this special issue edition of International Marketing Review focusing on international marketing ethics.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines how ethics in international marketing have evolved and progressed towards the current “ethics era” and presents discussion surrounding the role and value of an ethical approach towards marketing in a global marketplace.

Findings

Essentially the paper argues that marketers should creatively embrace the complex challenges of the international marketplace by rethinking their approach to marketing ethics.

Originality/value

Gives an overview of the special issue.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2013

Sally Dibb and Marylyn Carrigan

– The purpose of the editorial is to accompany this special issue on “Social marketing: social change”.

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14797

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the editorial is to accompany this special issue on “Social marketing: social change”.

Design/methodology/approach

The editorial presents three invited reflections by Philip Kotler, Michael Polonsky and Gerard Hastings. It also discusses the articles in this special issue.

Findings

Overall, the contributed papers demonstrate that there are many layers to social marketing.

Originality/value

The articles featured in this special issue help to advance social marketing theory as well as offer valuable implications and recommendations for managers, practitioners and policymakers.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 47 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Marylyn Carrigan and Isabelle Szmigin

Downloads
2665

Abstract

Details

Journal of Marketing Practice: Applied Marketing Science, vol. 5 no. 6/7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2538

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