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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2020

Marylouise Caldwell, Steve Elliot, Paul Henry and Marcus O'Connor

Despite consumers being essential stakeholders in the exponential growth of the sharing economy, consumers’ attitudes towards their rights and responsibilities are…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite consumers being essential stakeholders in the exponential growth of the sharing economy, consumers’ attitudes towards their rights and responsibilities are relatively unknown. This study aims to test a novel hypothesised model mapping consumers’ attitudes towards their consumer rights and responsibilities with that of their political ideology (liberalism, conservatism and libertarianism) and moral foundations (avoiding harm/fairness, in-group/loyalty, authority/respect and purity/sanctity).

Design/methodology/approach

Two survey studies were conducted with consumers of the Uber ride share service; the first being to test measures of political ideology and consumer rights/responsibilities. These measures were then taken into the second study along with the Moral Foundations Questionnaire. The hypothesised model was tested using structural equation modelling.

Findings

The findings suggest that political ideology associates with similarities and differences in how consumers perceive their rights and responsibilities in the sharing economy, including mutual self-regulation. Support for these findings is established by identifying links with specific moral foundations.

Research limitations/implications

This study considers a single participant in the sharing economy.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 January 2020

Arch G. Woodside, Marylouise Caldwell and Jennifer Rebecca Calhoun

This study defines service breakdowns, service breakdown prevention, and “servicide” as they relate to service-dominant logic. The study reviews relevant relevant…

Abstract

Purpose

This study defines service breakdowns, service breakdown prevention, and “servicide” as they relate to service-dominant logic. The study reviews relevant relevant literature on these three topics. This study categorizes real-life examples into five levels of dramatic turns toward service degradations and breakdowns that range from customer being aware but not mentioning service inadequacy to the service breakdown resulting in death of the customer or service provider. Taking initial steps in developing dramatic turn theory and improving the practice of service breakdown prevention are the major contributions of this study.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is a conceptual contribution that includes a dramatic turn role-playing exercise (at category 4 among five categories of dramatic turns for pedagogical/on-site enacting/practicing and training of service professionals. The study emphasizes and shows how to create and enact role-playing scenarios to increase requisite variety, provide training modules and increase skills/expertise in service enactment contexts.

Findings

Before explicit reviewing of the dramatic-turn performances, some of the participants as actors as well as audience members in role-play dramatic turns were quick to blame the customer behavior as the principal cause for the service breakdown. The study’s exposition stresses prevention of negative dramatic turns follows from experiencing and coaching a wide variety of customer and server interactions – achieving “richness” in enactments.

Research limitations/implications

Research on service breakdown prevention needs to include field experiments on the efficacy of training programs for effective management of dramatic turns.

Practical implications

Training of service workers and service managers in experiencing/participating in dramatic turns is likely to be beneficial in reducing the severe adverse outcomes and unintended consequences of service breakdowns. Prevention, not only service failure recovery, needs to be an explicit focus in hospitality management training and assessment.

Social implications

This study suggests tools and procedures to reduce the instances of the need for service breakdown recoveries.

Originality/value

The study calls attention and contributes a way forward in managing dramatic turns in hospitality service contexts. The study provides a nascent configurational theoretical foundation of dramatic-turn propositions. Given the severity of financial costs and loss of brand/firm reputation following the occurrence of extreme dramatic turns, a research focus on service breakdown prevention is necessary.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Content available
666

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Marylouise Caldwell and Paul Henry

The purpose of this editorial is to introduce six audio‐visual and written pieces that communicate research findings about contemporary popular culture.

1770

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this editorial is to introduce six audio‐visual and written pieces that communicate research findings about contemporary popular culture.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a summary overview of the papers in the special issue, highlighting similarities across submissions as well their distinctive contributions.

Findings

The authors conclude that researchers apply audio‐visual material to communicate their research findings in at least two ways: as stand‐alones to convey key messages; and to validate and/or dramatize highlights of their written work.

Originality/value

The paper provides an introduction to a special issue that features the application of multi‐media to communicate research findings associated with contemporary popular culture.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 January 2010

Marylouise Caldwell, Paul Henry and Ariell Alman

The purpose of this paper is to explain how audio‐visual archetypal representations likely to engender emotional identification and consumer‐inquisitiveness by marketing…

2634

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain how audio‐visual archetypal representations likely to engender emotional identification and consumer‐inquisitiveness by marketing professionals can be constructed.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs video‐ethnography involving the following steps: development of a typology of consumer archetypes based on a priori theory, screening for and identifying informants to exemplify each archetype, filming interviews in and around their homes, developing realistic audio‐visual representations of each archetype and assessing marketing practitioners reactions to the audio‐visual representations.

Findings

In response to the audio‐visual archetypal representations, marketing practitioners displayed a high degree of interest and emotional relatedness. The interest generated in the screenings motivated animated discussion and often a desire to better understand the consumers represented by each archetype. These heightened reactions contrast strongly with the relatively emotionally flat responses to traditional marketing research reports.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates that carefully crafted audio‐visual representations of consumer archetypes are likely to engender a consumer orientation in marketing professionals and hence associate with improved marketing decision‐making. It explains that this situation is likely explained by audio‐visual media's superior capacity to foster experiential, emotional knowledge of others, and, the origins of consumer archetypes in the collective un/consciousness and/or widespread strongly embedded cultural beliefs, norms, and values.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 March 2008

48

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Linden Dalecki

This paper is a companion piece to the short documentary Breakin' Away. The paper aims to touch on Texas b‐boy culture and tourism, the hip‐hop industry at large, book…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is a companion piece to the short documentary Breakin' Away. The paper aims to touch on Texas b‐boy culture and tourism, the hip‐hop industry at large, book publishing, intra‐industry media‐synergy, the Hollywood film industry and related aspects of pop culture.

Design/methodology/approach

Part ethnographic memoir, part confessional, part anecdotal how‐to, the article is written in the first person and fits within the tradition of autoethnography.

Findings

Given its autoethnographic focus, the paper follows several unique cases rather than attempting to abstract generalizable principles.

Originality/value

The paper provides an inside view of Texas b‐boy subculture and reveals specific aspects of the hip‐hop industry.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Maria Kniazeva

This paper aims to: better understand the country of origin (COO) construct by adopting a lens of marketplace mythology; and develop a conceptual framework delineating the…

1058

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to: better understand the country of origin (COO) construct by adopting a lens of marketplace mythology; and develop a conceptual framework delineating the process of mythologizing a country through the use of packaging.

Design/methodology/approach

Analysis of narratives on food product packages that claim a connection to Italy lets this qualitative study join two streams of research – on COO effect and marketplace mythology.

Findings

The work proposes four mythological properties of the country of origin construct, discusses their major dimensions, establishes their relationship, and develops a conceptual framework delineating the mythological nature of the country of origin construct.

Research limitations/implications

Several directions for future research may enhance this study. For example, the interpretation of the narratives by the consumers of food products claiming an Italian connection will allow exploring how the mythic structures employed by marketers are read by the intended readers.

Practical implications

The importance of COO effects on consumer decision making is expected to become even stronger with current globalization trends that increasingly move products across countries and force marketers to engage in a battle to differentiate their brands – in many cases by capitalizing on the origin of products.

Originality/value

By exploring food package stories, the paper focuses on the carrier of mythic meaning that is under‐researched in both COO and marketplace mythology studies. The present study adds to the understanding of how geography ceases being a mere informational “Made in” statement and is transformed into a powerful cultural marker, full of symbolically framed meaning.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 January 2010

Cynthia M. Webster, Richard Seymour and Kate Daellenbach

To thrive in today's competitive marketplace, businesses constantly need to search for opportunities to develop and be tuned into consumers as innovators. With this in…

1507

Abstract

Purpose

To thrive in today's competitive marketplace, businesses constantly need to search for opportunities to develop and be tuned into consumers as innovators. With this in mind, the purpose of this paper is to further understandings of the ways in which consumers transform ordinary products to serve their everyday needs; and broaden appreciation of the role observational research plays in opportunity identification.

Design/methodology/approach

A hermeneutic approach to observational research is adopted, incorporating both subjective personal introspection (SPI) and videography to discover one family's unusual usage behaviours.

Findings

Analysis, following Holbrook's typology of consumer value, reveals examples of innovative behaviours for the four active consumer value types of efficiency, status, play and ethics, while identification of the reactive value types of aesthetics, esteem, excellence and spirituality proves more difficult.

Research limitations/implications

This research suggests alternative approaches for future research into opportunity identification, making use of videography and SPI. Moreover, the current work emphasises that innovation and the creative require consideration of the relational rather than just self‐seeking behaviours, needs or events.

Originality/value

This paper illustrates two research methods infrequently used, SPI and videography, positioning both as valuable tools for opportunity identification.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Shelagh Ferguson

People arguably create “storied lives”; including constructing accounts of their leisure that become part of their personal and social identities. These stories are…

594

Abstract

Purpose

People arguably create “storied lives”; including constructing accounts of their leisure that become part of their personal and social identities. These stories are valuable and relevant, not just to themselves, but also to others with whom they choose to share their stories. This paper and accompanying film aim to further understanding of how consumers visiting the second highest bungy jump in the world construct and convey stories of this experience.

Design/methodology/approach

The research approach is exploratory. The researcher observed, interviewed, and filmed informants at the primary site of investigation. The interview transcripts were transcribed in full. Emergent themes were validated through constant cross‐checking. The themes provided the foundation for the accompanying video.

Findings

Several themes regarding narratives and high‐risk leisure emerged including the construction of factual accounts and rehearsed accounts, the use of markers to symbolize and make more tangible the consumption experience, and the role of technology in the communication of the stories.

Research limitations/implications

This exploratory research offers insight into the components of narratives for Generation Y tourists consuming in New Zealand. These findings do not claim to generalize to other samples or activities.

Originality/value

The paper extends the knowledge of how stories figure in consumers' lives; particularly in the context of the consumption of high‐risk leisure.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

1 – 10 of 26