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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Mary Westell

This paper proposes indicators for measuring the success of institutional repositories based on their demonstrated integration with other research initiatives and provides…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper proposes indicators for measuring the success of institutional repositories based on their demonstrated integration with other research initiatives and provides a snapshot of the current state of selected institutional repositories in Canada through a review of their web presence and their integration with university library and research pages.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the proposed indicators, an examination of the web sites of selected Canadian universities who are participating in the Canadian Association of Research Libraries Institutional Repository project was undertaken.

Findings

Institutional repositories are growing in Canada and that the Canadian IR community is on the way to the proposed model future – integration with existing university research practices.

Originality/value

Indicators such as those proposed in the paper can provide a basic framework for evaluating IR projects and highlight areas where the library can generate additional support for these worthwhile projects.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

B.M. Meera, M. Manjunath and Manjunath Kaddipujar

Facets of digital data dissemination, namely RRI Digital repository and Imprints collection, are two methods in which science communication can happen in the digital…

Abstract

Purpose

Facets of digital data dissemination, namely RRI Digital repository and Imprints collection, are two methods in which science communication can happen in the digital world. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the design, novelty and functionality of these facets as an archive, comprising a collage of profiles and publications of RRIians whose imprints on the sands of time have been culled and collated for posterity.

Design/methodology/approach

RRI Digital repository makes use of DSpace to preserve and showcase the research papers in text format, audio/video of lectures and images. Imprints collection is designed using Dreamweaver software. Images are uploaded using Jalbum.net software.

Findings

DSpace, an open source software meant for managing digital assets can be used as a platform to develop a modern genre of data dissemination. An example to this end is the Imprints collection, a bio‐bibliographic database with many valuable additions showcasing the digital scholarship of an institute with archival value.

Practical implications

Practical implications of both RRI digital repository and imprints collection is to act as support service to enhance the creativity and collaboration among scientists of the institute within and across different research institutes in the country and across the world. Further, ResearcherID embedded in the profile pages of scientists helps scientometricians in citation analysis.

Originality/value

Novelty associated with imprints collection in science communication using DSpace data is the strength of this tool. This is a unique style of digital data dissemination with supporting links between authors, their persona, their papers, lectures and photographs.

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1925

THERE was an air of expectancy about the audience which assembled at Draper's Hall on October 27th to hear the address with which the President of the Board of Education…

15

Abstract

THERE was an air of expectancy about the audience which assembled at Draper's Hall on October 27th to hear the address with which the President of the Board of Education inaugurated the session of the London Branch of the Library Association. Quite unjustifiably, we fear, because it rested upon the expectation, or hope, that the noble and right honourable gentleman would deliver his views of library policy in anticipation of the report of the Trevelyan Committee. Lord Eustace Percy's speech was charming, was stimulating, and was an excellent statement of certain elementary ideals, which, though familiar to us all, cannot be emphasised too often. It was, indeed, exactly the type of speech which a cultured and skilful statesman must make (if he have the ability) to such an audience as ours, which would dearly have liked to hear him say something nearer to what was in their own minds. It said nothing whatever about the Committee, or even referred to its existence. Of course, no minister would or could anticipate the deliberations of any body which had not yet finished its work.

Details

New Library World, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Kris Hinterseer

In 1984 the world was running a current account deficit with itself of US$100bn. The World Bank, the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the Organisation for Economic…

Abstract

In 1984 the world was running a current account deficit with itself of US$100bn. The World Bank, the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the Organisation for Economic Co‐operation and Development (OECD), and the US Federal Reserve have all confirmed this observation. Given that world trade forms a closed system, the question arises of what caused the indicators that measure this trade to become so inaccurate. The observation that in the early 1980s the narcotics trade surpassed the petroleum industry to become the world's largest business activity by gross turnover provides a partial answer. Noting that the growth in the narcotics trade is merely one aspect of the unprecedented growth in organised crime and the illegal economy over the last two decades leads to a more complete answer. The implication is that criminal economic activity, which by its nature seeks to evade capture in statistics, accounts for a significant portion of global economic activity missed by standard accounting practices.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

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